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Letters to the editor


No glamor

In recent weeks, there have been a series of articles in the Curry Coastal Pilot glamorizing the use of alcohol and marijuana. These articles say nothing about using drugs or alcohol responsibility and they don’t describe the risks associated with use.

Some people can use and/or abuse substances for a lifetime with seemingly minimal damage. But others take one toke or one sip and don’t ever stop. Some of them cross the line between responsible use and cause a great deal of damage.

Every year people who start off partying whether with Pabst or tequila or some other

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No glamor

In recent weeks, there have been a series of articles in the Curry Coastal Pilot glamorizing the use of alcohol and marijuana. These articles say nothing about using drugs or alcohol responsibility and they don’t describe the risks associated with use.

Some people can use and/or abuse substances for a lifetime with seemingly minimal damage. But others take one toke or one sip and don’t ever stop. Some of them cross the line between responsible use and cause a great deal of damage.

Every year people who start off partying whether with Pabst or tequila or some other substances kill themselves or someone else on the highway. Every year Safe and Sober is held hoping to keep high school students sober enough to avoid accidents upon graduation. Every year substance abusers cause domestic violence and public acts that waste taxpayer money and police time and effort.

I’m old enough to know that marijuana is often a gateway drug, and I’ve lived here long enough to see crimes such as methamphetamine use and sale and associated theft and violence increase exponentially.

And I’ve seen first-hand how drugs and alcohol destroy relationships and people, and experienced the pain. Just because something is legal doesn’t make it good.

The Curry Coastal Pilot should not publish articles that glamorize the use of drugs or alcohol. I will not renew my subscription to the Curry Pilot unless this paper stops condoning the use of substances that contribute to so much human waste.

Mark Williams

Brookings

Don’t go unheard

My organization recently wrote a letter to the U.S. Supreme Court advising the justices that there is a misunderstanding that is causing chaos in our legal system.

Many people believe our legal system has two levels, when there are three. Most people see only constitutional law and federal law. What is being left out is Universal Law, which is immutable and stands on the seven principles of equality, liberty, freedom, compassion, abundance, capacity and tolerance. The seven principles allow the swinging pendulum to return to the straight and narrow.

The universe always has three levels — the principles, the power and the project. When you omit universal law, that is when our government can justify laws and practices that are abuses of their power.

There has been much made recently of fake news. When lies are told, the truth doesn’t overcome the lies. It just leads to the point where no one knows who to trust. The only thing we can trust is universal law.

The cover-up of covert and overt actions leads to loss of freedom, including freedom of the press, and that leads to resistance, and when the resistance is blocked, the ultimate conclusion of that power game around the world is massacres. What has occurred in other nations is now starting in the U.S.

If you resist, your voice will go unheard unless you can offer a plan that benefits everyone.

Karen Holmes

Brookings

Need right person

I think Commissioner Tom Huxley is way off base on needing a male enforcement officer to intimidate people into following rules.

Most every man, and most women, who have any experience and knowledge of the real world know that no matter how big your biggest SOB in the valley is, the other side can generally find a bigger one on their side.

This is not the way to solve the enforcement problem. All the enforcement officer needs is proper training, a working cell phone and the sheriff’s number. The deputies have the proper training, knowledge of the law and a strong trigger finger, and it’s theirs and CTR’s job to remove trash, not the enforcement officer.

I would far rather have a pit bull in there who would grab the problem and not let go of it until a solution is found, in a matter of days and weeks instead of months and years. Leave the intimidation to people who are trained and paid to do that and let the enforcement officer carry out the rules, so the rest of us won’t have to look at it.

On the other hand, I would want the commissioners to stop being so worried about records and procedures and whether some IT guy talks bad to them and pass regulations to back up our pit bull so she, or he, can do her job. Sounds like we already have a candidate.

Bill Tuma

Brookings