Transportation Funding

A portion of the $1.2 billion will be allocated over the next five years for highway and bridge construction and maintenance, safety improvements, mass transit investments, bicycle and pedestrian facilities, electric vehicle charging stations, and efforts to reduce carbon emissions from transportation sources.

The Oregon Department of Transportation will receive over $1 billion dollars in additional transportation funding as part of the federal infrastructure package, according to Oregon Transportation Commission Chair Bob Van Brocklin.

“This past weekend Congress completed work on the largest infrastructure finance bill in history," Van Brocklin said. "Once signed by the president, the $1.2 trillion bill will allow ODOT to address a number of major challenges in our state."

The money will go toward projects around the state that will benefit drivers, transit riders, cyclists and pedestrians, help maintain roads and bridges, and address climate change, according to Van Brocklin.

"We’re still analyzing the legislation to determine exactly how much funding ODOT will receive and where it will spend the money," Van Brocklin said. "Many projects are ready for construction, and others are in the final stages of planning so we should be able to move quickly."

ODOT plans to conduct a media briefing this week to release additional details. The specifics about that event were pending as of early Monday morning. Nov. 8.

Van Brocklin said the Oregon Transportation Commission and ODOT will direct the funds, combined with state funding from the Oregon Legislature to "make real progress" on Oregon’s transportation priorities.

A portion of the $1.2 billion will be allocated over the next five years for highway and bridge construction and maintenance, safety improvements, mass transit investments, bicycle and pedestrian facilities, electric vehicle charging stations, and efforts to reduce carbon emissions from transportation sources, according to Van Brocklin.

“These resources will help us address congestion, which is increasing in our urban areas as the state’s population continues to grow; freight mobility, earthquake recovery preparedness, passenger rail, and other elements of the comprehensive mobility system we seek to create," Van Brocklin said. "All of this work will focus on improving our economy, our environment, and the quality of life of all Oregonians. Working together, we can attain this vision."

In anticipation of this major new commitment at the federal level, beginning in 2020, the Oregon Transportation Commission and ODOT began working on a number of changes to create a modern transportation system that prioritizes equity, climate, safety, and the delivery of reliable transportation options to serve the diverse need of citizens and businesses across the state, according to Van Brocklin.

"These early efforts position us to quickly invest the federal funds we receive and additional funds we will seek from new and continuing federal grant programs authorized by the bill Congress passed last weekend," he said. “The Oregon Transportation Commission and ODOT are deeply grateful for the hard work of our federal delegation to make this historic legislation a reality. We look forward to putting these new resources to work to build a better future for the people of Oregon.”

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