Sneaker wave warning

A beach hazard announcement for sneaker waves has been placed in effect for the Curry County coast from Saturday afternoon through that evening, the National Weather Service reported Friday.

Sneaker waves are sudden and unusually high beach run-ups that can take beachgoers by surprise, resulting in possible injury or drowning. Logs and other debris can be lifted and floated, increasing risk to those in or near the water.

Beachcombers are urged to take caution and never turn their backs to the ocean.

Reward offered

The Port of Brookings Harbor is offering a $500 reward for tips that lead to the arrest and conviction of the person who stole a golf court from Beachfront RV Park, port officials said Wednesday.

The theft apparently took place at about 6:30 p.m. Jan. 25.

Anyone with information is asked to call Port Harbormaster Travice Webster at 541.469-2218 or travis@portofbrookingsharbor.com or Sheriff’s Deputy Jason Thien, at 541-247-3242, ext. 4, or thienj@county.curry.or.us.

Roseburg VA news

The Roseburg Mental Health Advocacy Council (RMHAC) is is hosting a kickoff meeting from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. March 11 in the library conference Room (212) in Building 2 of the Roseburg VA Medical Center.

The new council, comprised of veterans, families, veterans service organizations, community partners and Roseburg VA Health Care system staff, is dedicated to advocacy, education, outreach and empowerment and to improve services and access to services.

Mental health issues, including PTSD, military sexual trauma, traumatic brain injuries, substance abuse recovery and suicide, can arise from a variety of issues stemming from their military experience. Some are evident during or shortly after transitioning, while others can surface decades later.

Initially, the council will meet in Roseburg but will eventually have sub-chapters throughout the areas covered by Roseburg VA Healthcare system, including Curry and Del Norte counties.

Anyone using or qualifying for VA mental health services and family members are urged to become involved. For more information contact jessica.lloyd.rogers@gmail.com or keith.lewis2@va.gov.

American Pickers return

The hit TV show American Pickers is looking for valuable antiques often found squirreled away in attics, closets and garages — and they’re revisiting Oregon.

The hit show follows Mike and Frank, as they comb through old barns, outbuildings, attics and basements to find sizeable, unique collections and learn the interesting stories behind them.

As they hit the back roads from coast to coast, Mike and Frank are on a mission to recycle and rescue forgotten relics, in hopes of giving historically significant objects a new lease on life while learning a thing or two about America’s past along the way.

“American Pickers” is looking for leads to large, private collections or accumulations of antiques.

People who might have an interesting collection can send their names, phone numbers, location and item descriptions with photos to: americanpickers@cineflix.com or call 855-OLD-RUST.

Hospice lauded

Coastal Home Health and Hospice earned a Recognition of Achievement Certificate, given to hospice services that rank in the top 35th percentile of scores on the home Health Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems.

The recognition is part of the HealthInsight Quality Award Program that was launched in 2004 to promote transparency in healthcare by being “accountable to the public, working opening, making results known and guiding trust through disclosure.”

Facilities are judged on 16 measures used by the Home Health Quality Reporting Program for Medicare.

“We are pleased to recognize these outstanding home health agencies that are working continually to improve healthcare quality and patient care for Oregon residents,” said Kate Elliott, associate executive director of HealthInsight Oregon. “Their commitment to excellence is evident … and underscores home health’s critical role in delivery systems to allow people to recover in their homes from injury or illness.”

Chick Days back

Gold Beach Lumber in Harbor is hosting a free seminar at 6:30 p.m. March 14 to introduce people to the hobby of raising backyard chickens.

The course includes instruction on raising chicks into healthy birds, flock management and nutrition; Greg Roush, an animal nutrition specialist from Purina will be the guest speaker.

There will be door prizes and snacks, and attendees are welcome to take home a free chick.

Register by calling 541-469-6617.

Domoic acid up

Crab tested in the two zones from Cape Blanco to Gold Beach (Zone K) and there to the Oregon border (Zone L) remains above the acceptable limit for domoic acid, which means crab caught in that area must be eviscerated before sale.

Those two zones have been under evisceration orders since Feb. 11 as domoic acid levels exceeded acceptable health standards.

One of the six test results earlier this week in Zone K showed domoic acid levels of 40 parts per million; the acceptable limit is 30 ppm. A test there March 7 showed levels at 78 ppm, and another in Zone L was 100 ppm.

Tests will continue next week. There must be two consecutive weeks of clean tests before the evisceration order can be lifted.

League issues

The League of Women Voters of Curry County (LWVCC) obtained resolutions from the county, Brookings, Gold Beach and Port Orford to declare the month of March "Revive Civility Month" in their jurisdictions.

Local league government observers and members said they were concerned last year about the increase in confrontations during some local government meetings and felt proclaiming March as “Revive Civility Month” would be a good way to start the new year, said LWVCC President Lucie La Bonté.

“We all need to be respectful of each other to move important issues forward,” she said. “So far in 2019, we have noticed a positive change at meetings.”

The state league declaration encourages elected boards to “Promote civil discourse through action and education for all government bodies, staff and citizens (to) improve public policy decisions and processes. Civil discourse means, at a minimum, mutually respectful, courteous, constructive and orderly communication.”

The county’s resolution reads, in part that “heated rhetoric and a dramatic shift away from collaboration leaves us unable to solve the challenges confronting our community, and civility reduces rudeness, ridicule and lack of respect for the open exchange of ideas, and civility improves our well-being restores trust and encourages Americans to participate in building a brighter future for generations to come, and civility assists in the process of working together to create lasting solutions to our most pressing problems while fostering respect among opposing groups.”

Another issue the league has tackled recently is that of hard rock mining, originally proposed by the Curry League to be studied at the state LOWV 2015 convention.

At the local level, the group has also been discussing gun control, the transient lodging tax that will be on the May 21 ballot and the reduction or possible ban on plastic bags. The city of Gold Beach, where an initial presentation was made, tabled the issue at its latest meeting and may revisit it later.

“We have a strong local league position on recycling,” the league newsletter reads. “Plastic bags have been banned in other jurisdictions and there are a couple of bills floating through the legislature on bans of bags and plastic straws.”

No confidence

The Curry County Board of Commissioners voted late last month to support Jackson County — and possibly Douglas County — and send a letter with with a vote of no confidence to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the state Department of Fish and Wildlife for their part in allegedly failing to protect spring Chinook salmon on the Upper Rogue River.

Chinook returns have dropped precipitously since the Lost Creek, Applegate and Elk Creek dams were built in Jackson County. Only Lost Creek still stands, and it is the responsibility of the two agencies to ensure it doesn’t adversely affect fish populations downstream.

Fisheries expert Steve Beyerlin told county commissioners last month that the Cole Rivers Hatchery was built by the Corps in 1973 to mitigate for spawning and rearing areas blocked by the construction of the dams. He also said the two agencies in charge of ensuring a successful fishery have failed to do so.

Federal regulations require that inundation of the river below the dam cause no damage to Chinook populations, but that numbers have plummeted and the agencies have done nothing to address it, he said.

Compensation board vols needed

Curry County is seeking two residents to serve on its compensation board, which annually reviews the pay rates of elected officials to those in comparable positions in similar counties throughout the state.

The board considers the number of employees supervised and the size of the budget administered by each elective officer, duties and responsibilities, and compensation paid to subordinates and other employees who serve in positions of comparable management responsibility.

The board then prepares and recommends compensation for the elected officials here and submits that to the county for consideration during its budget talks each spring.

The three-year terms are staggered; the first position expires at the end of this year and the second at the end of 2021.

Those with knowledge about personnel and compensation management are encouraged to apply. Applications can be found at the Curry County website www.co.curry.or.us, or a paper application can be obtained by calling 541-247-3296.

Applications are due March 14.

Revenue task force members sought

Curry County commissioners are looking for four citizens to serve on its Citizens Revenue Task Force (CRTF), after members of the committee resigned late last month, citing a lack of promised autonomy.

The purpose of the CRTF to explore options to address declining county revenues in the face of increasing costs, especially for public safety and other vital county services.

Commissioners are seeking broad community representation, including small business owners — especially those that are food service and tourism-related — retirees, full-time and part-time employees and others.

Task force members will be appointed at a regular commissioner meeting April 3.

Meetings will be held at the convenience of the task force members.

Interested citizens should apply on the county’s website under Quick Links at: http://www.co.curry.or.us or call 541-247-3296 to receive a paper application. The application deadline is 5 p.m. March 28.

No Confidence

The Curry County Board of Commissioners voted late last month to support Jackson County — and possibly Douglas County — and send a letter with with a vote of no confidence to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the state Department of Fish and Wildlife for their part in allegedly failing to protect spring Chinook salmon on the Upper Rogue River.

Chinook returns have dropped precipitously since the Lost Creek, Applegate and Elk Creek dams were built in Jackson County. Only Lost Creek still stands, and it is the responsibility of the two agencies to ensure it doesn’t adversely affect fish populations downstream.

Fisheries expert Steve Beyerlin told county commissioners last month that the Cole Rivers Hatchery was built by the Corps in 1973 to mitigate for spawning and rearing areas blocked by the construction of the dams. He also said the two agencies in charge of ensuring a successful fishery have failed to do so.

Federal regulations require that inundation of the river below the dam cause no damage to Chinook populations, but that numbers have plummeted and the agencies have done nothing to address it, he said.

Compensation board volunteers needed

Curry County is seeking two residents to serve on its compensation board, which annually reviews the pay rates of elected officials to those in comparable positions in similar counties throughout the state.

The board considers the number of employees supervised and the size of the budget administered by each elective officer, duties and responsibilities, and compensation paid to subordinates and other employees who serve in positions of comparable management responsibility.

The board then prepares and recommends compensation for the elected officials here and submits that to the county for consideration during its budget talks each spring.

The three-year terms are staggered; the first position expires at the end of this year and the second at the end of 2021.

Those with knowledge about personnel and compensation management are encouraged to apply. Applications can be found at the Curry County website www.co.curry.or.us, or a paper application can be obtained by calling 541-247-3296.

Applications are due March 14.

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