Close
Request mobile website view
Subscribe | Log In
Welcome back!
My Account | Log Out

City sprucing up light poles, benches


The decorative bases for 16 downtown street light poles will be reinstalled this week, and work continues on reconditioning 58 downtown benches and sidewalk repair throughout town while the weather is nice.

The green light poles and benches were installed about 12 years ago as a part of a downtown improvement project. The cost of reconditioning the 16 poles bases was $11,625 and the 58 benches are being reconditioned, five at a time, at a cost of $350 each.

“The powder-coat paint on the light pole bases had become chipped and peeled over time,” City Manager Gary Milliman said. “Some

Continue to read this article and more, subscribe now

Subscribe and get unlimited digital access.

The decorative bases for 16 downtown street light poles will be reinstalled this week, and work continues on reconditioning 58 downtown benches and sidewalk repair throughout town while the weather is nice.

The green light poles and benches were installed about 12 years ago as a part of a downtown improvement project. The cost of reconditioning the 16 poles bases was $11,625 and the 58 benches are being reconditioned, five at a time, at a cost of $350 each.

“The powder-coat paint on the light pole bases had become chipped and peeled over time,” City Manager Gary Milliman said. “Some of the bases were damaged by encounters with skateboards and other misuse. Once the powder-coating is compromised, our coastal weather takes over and further erodes the paint.”

The city budgets $8,000 a year for general sidewalk repairs; this week’s work includes a stretch along Oak Street at the driveway serving Coast Auto and the curb at Fern and Pacific avenues.

“The sidewalk and driveway on Oak is a maze of curbs and pavement repair,” Milliman said. “I have personally observed young mothers attempting to negotiate this area with strollers and can imagine the difficulty encountered by people using wheelchairs.”

Work involved clearing overgrown brush, demolishing the pavement and pouring new concrete.

Trash cans installed as a part of the downtown project have also been replaced with weather-resilient cans and are being emptied by Curry Transfer and Recycling at no charge to the city. The smaller hole in which to deposit trash has also cut down dramatically on people illegally dumping their household trash, CTR officials have said.