Letters to the editor Nov. 27, 2013

By The Curry Coastal Pilot November 26, 2013 10:40 pm

Grammar and bears

Your cover story (Pilot, Nov. 20) about C&K filing Chapter 11 featured a photo with a caption about the number of employees being “layed” off. The correct word is “laid,” which was correctly used later in the article. What happened to proof reading?

My husband and I have lived part-time here for the last five years. Articles about low test scores in Brookings schools are distressing. To have the local paper exhibiting poor grammar in its article does not help promote higher standards. 

On another note, I feel having a crab festival is a positive step forward in promoting the area. The display of costumed bears, in my opinion, is not. It makes the town look carnival-like instead of quaint and substantial. 

As a property owner, we have a vested interest in the area. Educational standards and a thriving economy are of importance in maintaining our property values and well as all of Brookings. 

Patricia A. Johnson

Harbor

Two-year advantage

We elect our leaders, federal and local, for terms of four to six years and some appointed for life. 

During this cycle some are incompetent or corrupt in office, not filling expectation. 

We need a process of removal, short of impeachment, when they refuse to resign. Our two-year election cycle is an opportunity to weed-out scoundrels in midterm. A binding, no-confidence vote could cancel a lame-duck-swim. 

I would start at the top.  

Tom Holden 

Brookings

quality arguments

Senator Wyden, please continue your efforts to protect our public lands for public use that include activities like mountain biking, hiking, fishing, camping and rafting. 

Help us to find a way to address the financial “arguments.” I am talking about the quality of life. 

Edward Rossiter 

Gold Beach

It could’ve worked

Lottery supporters — thank you!

I want to thank everyone for their support of our lottery proposal. From what we learned, it could have worked, but the State of Oregon and Curry County Commissioners wouldn’t give it a chance.

Even when the commissioners were informed that Oregon allows a non-profit organization (which could have been established) to run raffles under license from the Department of Justice and could have achieved the same results, it fell on deaf ears.

All the commissioners wanted were more taxes as evidenced by the November tax levy. A raffle could have provided the economic stimulus that a tax levy never will.

We continue to look at other options separate from the county, to bring new options to the people of Curry County as our commissioners continue to try to guilt, scare, and bully us into paying more taxes.

When our commissioners come up for re-election in the future I hope that we all send a message and vote them out. As I follow the “Letters to the Editor” it’s obvious “We, the People” have no confidence in any of our current leaders.

Again, I thank everyone for their support; unfortunately I’m not wealthy enough to change our local leaders by myself but we can do it together.

J.R. Wilson

Harbor

Sutter subterfuge

Those licensed to provide health care are required to include certain patient care considerations. Some are moral or ethical, some are legal. Two components that are morally, ethically and legally required are: a comprehensive informed consent; and, the directive “Do no harm.”

A comprehensive, informed consent requires that patients/clients are provided with factual, scientific information on the advantages and disadvantages; risks and benefits of given advice, including tests, prescriptions or procedures, as well as what may happen if one chooses not to follow the advice.

“Do no harm” is self explanatory.

It has become abundantly clear that Sutter Health does not believe in, or practice, these essential health care components as related to Sutter Coast Hospital and its service population.

While they claim to provide “honesty, integrity, openness and truthfulness in everything they do,” their practices fly in the face of their rhetoric. 

Sutter Health’s “study” on strategic options for THEIR future included a committee appointed by them; individuals they selected for interviews; a company chosen and paid by them; and, data they provided for review. The individuals selected were mainly representative of their corporation, or corporate culture. Much of the data provided was incomplete, inaccurate or misleading. They have been unwilling to participate in public forums; maintained secrecy of participants and process; and reject open client/community participation. 

Sutter Health and its board of directors published their willingness to “receive comments (on the “study”) until noon Monday, Nov. 11” (ironically, Veterans’ Day). This was published in the November 9 newspaper, and only accessible to those with computers. 

It is abundantly clear. Sutter Health does not want consumer involvement, does not intend to provide informed consent, and exhibits no interest in the potential harm to those they are charged and paid to serve.

Catherine Wiley

Brookings

Wyden earns praise

As a small business owner in Coos and Curry counties, I am particularly aware of the importance that public lands and the recreation industry hold for our local economy. 

My experience has shown me that ensuring that public lands remain in public hands is in the best interest of present and future residents of our region. I run a guide service, South Coast Tours LLC, that takes clients kayaking and fishing in the estuaries as well as out in the ocean from Coos Bay to Brookings. The biggest draw for my tour business is the natural splendor of the south coast. Whether it is kayak fishing or simply enjoying the beauty of our many headlands teaming with wildlife, my tours depend on a healthy and productive ecosystem. 

I want to thank Senator Wyden for helping to protect our public lands for all of us, especially for his efforts with the Oregon Treasures Act. We need him to reject any efforts to strip protections from national parks or wilderness areas, and stop efforts to weaken or revoke the Antiquities Act, which is crucial to protecting unique places for future generations. 

With his leadership we can find the right balance between a sustainable harvest and the protections of our public lands for all of their values like outdoor recreation, clean air and water, healthy fisheries and all the other services we take for granted. 

Dave Lacey

Gold Beach

Let’s build with bond

Let the green ghost become a space for community and events, indoor market and visitor’s center. 

Ask for a community bond to build it and the renters will come. 

Let’s build the community we want to live in.

Trace Kather 

Brookings

Very bad decision

Our paper recently announced that the only grocery shop in Harbor, Shop Smart, is to be closed while Ray’s Food Place, whose mostly empty lot is right across from Fred Meyer is to remain open.

If Shop Smart is closed without a replacement, we will be forced to drive from south of Harbor to the north of Brookings to shop and after having driven so far, why would I shop at Ray’s when a BIG one stop shop, Freddy’s, is right across the street from it?

They have a much larger grocery area and everything else I would need.

People will chose to reduce unnecessary driving as fuel prices will be going up again.

I think the C&K corporation has made a very bad business decision by closing the busy grocer in Harbor while leaving the empty Ray’s food shop open.

I will very much miss Shop Smart.

Sheila Chambers

Brookings