Letters to the Editor April 27, 2013

By The Curry Coastal Pilot April 27, 2013 12:19 am

limit terms, words

Members of Congress would do well to heed the advice of James Madison, fourth president of the U.S. and who was instrumental in the drafting of the Constitution. He warned against creating laws “so voluminous that they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood.” The Obamacare “package” has somewhere between 1,500 and 3,000 pages (I’ve heard varying figures) and the upcoming Amnesty Bill contains 844 pages, a bill which will impact the entire country in that, should it pass, will allow some 11 million illegal aliens to compete with American citizens for jobs at every skill level.

As we’re aware, MizzWitchiPelosi announced that Obamacare had to be passed so we know what’s in it; many, even in Congress, are now finally beginning to realize some of the snares and snags involved. I strongly suspect that the same general idea will truly come to light with the Amnesty Bill. No one has had time to read the entire bill, so it’s a safe bet that there will be far reaching consequences, most especially on citizens who have been unemployed for many months.

Complete, total idiocy, irresponsibility, and any trace of concern for the people of this once great nation. We not only need term limits but also some legislation that limits the verbosity of any bill and forbids riders that have nothing whatever to do with the bill to be added to it.

Doris Roepke

Brookings

pac donors concern

I read with interest the article about the Curry Tax Levy (Pilot, April 24). The group, Curry PAC (Political Action Committee), is the biggest citizens group cheerleading for this latest wealth confiscation scam. I decided to go to the Oregon Secretary of State website to follow the money and see who is behind this group. 

The individual names were familiar to me. But I discovered the single biggest financial contributor to Curry PAC is the Smith River Rancheria. The Rancheria made cash contributions to Curry PAC on March 25 ($1825), April 3 ($2500), and  April 17 ($500). This is a total of $4,825 coming from an out-of-state Indian Gaming Corporation. There was also one other major cash contribution on March 18 ($1,000) from C&K Markets. 

Why would an out-of-state casino want to support the increase in my property taxes? I would think they would want me to retain more of my hard-earned money to feed their slot machines. What is their real agenda? Who can give me a straight, truthful answer? 

John M. Johnson 

Brookings

may-lopez for socc

Not many voters are aware of the election for the Southwestern Community College Board of Education. 

Southwestern’s original charter, in 1960, stated that Board members would be elected district-wide, not by geographical areas. Since the annexation of Curry County into the college district in 1995, one seat has been able to be filled by a Curry resident. This election does not attract much attention in the southern part of the district. 

When ballots arrive, many Curry residents may not recognize the candidates for these slots. The Coos County population is considerably larger than Curry, meaning that there is always the likelihood that seats will be filled from the northern part of the District. 

The Board selected Judy May-Lopez to fill the recently vacated position held by Cherie Mitchell. She has barely begun, and now the slot is up for re-election. She is certainly knowledgeable about the college, first gaining her own two-year degree from SOCC’s Curry program, and then utilizing the college’s University Center connection to Eastern Oregon University to finish her Bachelor’s Degree. She has learned first-hand of the challenges faced by students in rural areas. 

Judy May-Lopez is well known in our south coast area through her professional and volunteer activities. I am very certain that she will continue to bring a level of professional and personal knowledge and expertise to Position 7, SOCC Board of Education, and encourage you to vote for her.

Peggy Goergen, 

retired dean

SOCC Curry Program

Brookings

well done mr. carey

I enjoyed reading the guest opinion of Richard Carey. I had almost given up on the idea that there was a person with a rational position on one of the important issues of our time. 

Well done, Mr. Carey.

S.J. Hyatt

Brookings

misuse v. hamburgers

This letter is regarding the April 24 Pilot article “Measure draws support, opposition.”

In the article Commissioner Smith is elated to learn the Tax Levy received bipartisan support the past week. The Brookings City Council unanimously rejects a resolution in support of the Levy April 22 and Councilor Hodges says “We have three commissioners who can’t communicate with each other (due to quorum laws).”

Smith knew of bipartisan support April 11 after he and Commissioner Itzen showed up (uninvited) and took over the Curry County Republican Central Committee meeting (CCRCC). According to Sue Gold, CCRCC chair, Smith and Itzen proceeded to intimidate, scare and ultimately pressure many of those present to sign a resolution (which they conveniently brought with them) agreeing to support the Levy. So much for quorum and election laws Councilor Hodges.

Itzen had tried (solo) unsuccessfully to sway CCRCC members’ opinions on the Levy February 14.  

The resolution rejection referred to in the Pilot article may be related to a two-page letter dated April 16 from Commissioner Smith to Oregon Secretary of State Kate Brown alleging “possible” statute violations by the Brookings City Council and manager. Smith uses the words “possible,” “possibly” and “could be” a total of nine times. 

Smith expends his and county counsel’s time alleging “possible” misuse of tax dollars while having county staff expend thousands of man hours preparing for and attending budget meetings weeks on end and, creating pretty color charts to pass out showing that it will only take 3,507 new McDonald’s restaurants built in Curry County by December 2013 to make up the county revenue shortfall. Yes, 3,507. Go to www.currycountytaxes.com to see this actual example, to read the complaint letter and much more.

Thomas Huxley

Harbor

support for 8-71

I have read letters from various citizens stating their objections to the Tax Levy 8-71. I wish to address a few of those concerns:

•We are a retirement community that does not use the schools. Response: I am a grandparent and think of the youth in our community and their need for a quality education. We currently have a dropout rate of almost 30 percent in our schools and that is unacceptable and a 20 percent cut in the education budget is irresponsible.

•We are old and do not use the jail or sheriff’s office. Response: Hopefully, the statement is accurate; however, should a crime happen against us I would hope law enforcement would apprehend the criminal and have a place to hold them pending adjudication. Additionally, currently we only have five (5) sheriff’s deputies patroling 85 square miles. That is only one sheriff per eight hour shift covering the entire county. Not exactly, reassuring! 

If the measure passes we will have two sheriffs per watch. It would give us a total of 12 deputies, which is a bare minimum to cover us 24 hours, seven days a week. This includes vacation relief, sick leave and regular days off. Again, not over staffed. Additionally, should the perpetrator be tried and convicted (or pleads guilty) they will need to be on either probation or parole and it would help to have probation/parole officers to supervise the probationer/parolee.

•We are old and don’t use the library. Response: This is not true. I know a number of individuals who are in their 60s, 70s and even 80s that regularly use our local library, as they cannot afford to buy books, or audio books. Additionally, our children and grandchildren need the library to study, do research and for recreational reading. Why would older individuals want to restrict the growth and development of our and our friend’s children and grandchildren?

I support Measure 8-71 because, if this measure passes, we can support not only law enforcement, the District Attorney’s Office, Probation/Parole officers and still support infrastructure, schools, libraries, county government and all the amenities that allow us to call this a community. 

As a member of a community, I care about my friends, neighbors and their families, friends and neighbors.

Terry Brayer

Ophir