Letters to the Editor March 2, 2013

By Scott Graves, Pilot staff writer March 01, 2013 07:11 pm

costs to all citizens

It is reassuring that the city of Brookings is aware that there are regulations regarding impacts on the Chetco River, based on their permit application to the Army Corps of Engineers for gravel removal from Social Security Bar.

The Chetco does not belong to the city, local residents, or even those living on the river. Further, most know the summer salmon catches are not reflective of the health of the Chetco, since they are not Chetco fish.

The laws and regulations established in this wonderful country are, fortunately, not intended to benefit individuals, but to protect and benefit our natural resources and the public majority. All law-abiding citizens have a responsibility to ensure compliance.

It would behoove all of our public officials, as well as our “news”paper, to consider the sources who oppose protections of our Wild and Scenic River, and those who attack individuals advocating protections.

Consideration should be made for the costs to all citizens when governmental entities have to enforce laws and regulations when there is non-compliance, such as: repeated citations by the state fire marshal; landslides caused by unpermitted roads; landfills on the river banks; rip-rap for personal convenience or corporate gain, etc.

Most law-abiding citizens believe they have a duty to uphold the law, and report illegal or unauthorized activities. Those who don’t should be legally viewed as accomplices, or interfering with making a report.

Catherine Wiley

Brookings

 

 

bankruptcy bill?

The recent increase in your Letters to the Editor regarding the proposed county tax measure is encouraging, especially seeing some new and unfamiliar names at the end of the letters.

To date, two subject areas have received little attention. Vacation, holiday and sick leave are not identified on county Master Payroll records, yet this paid benefit totals nearly 15 percent of total work days per year. To a small business these can be a huge item and expense. A new county employee receives 36 paid days/year. A five-year employee receives 39 days. There are 22 work days in an average month.  

The second area is the use of Chapter 9 federal bankruptcy code for municipalities which is currently allowed (state law) in some form in about half of the states but not in Oregon. In town hall meetings last April (2012), Representative Krieger and Senator Kruse were asked if they would propose legislation to allow municipalities to use this tool to deal with subjects such as collective bargaining and the PERS (Public Employee Retirement System) issue. Their responses were vague at best.

In a January 8, 2013, newsletter, Kruse encouraged citizens to share their views and thoughts with him. 

Kruse was again asked Feb. 14, 2013, if he would propose such legislation and responded “I am one of the sponsors of a bill to allow for bankruptcy proceedings this session.” 

The logical question to ask Kruse was, “What’s the bill number?” 

Surprise: There is no bill (still gathering signatures). Repeated requests for Kruse to provide a paragraph summarizing what the bill will include have gone unanswered.

I would encourage any interested citizen to contact Kruse at This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it and voice support for such legislation and request the status and summary of what he is proposing.

Thomas Huxley

 Harbor

 

 

incomplete objective

It was not my intention to write anymore letters for publication until I read “Hail to the Chief” (Pilot, Feb. 20). 

The first thing they teach one in the military is about the chain of command. The commander in chief is the president of the United States, and after Congressional approval, he hands down the objective which goes to the chiefs of staff who hand it down to the generals or admirals who then pass it down each rank ’til it reaches Captain Marvel who hand picks his men to complete the objective. 

If Capt. Marvel fails to achieve the objective, then may I say, sir, that Capt. Marvel needs more training? 

Hail to the Chief. 

John Baker 

Brookings

 

1 percent for both

Oooooops! My last letter to the editor had misinformation.

My excuse is I am Old! My forehead is now my eyebrows, my cheeks are now my double chin and neck, my breasts are now part of my armpits, my butt is now my thighs, and the last age degrading body defect is my feet are two sizes bigger.

That’s my excuse and I am sticking to it. 

The correction I need to make is as follows:  Ray’s grocery store has an “All Access,” 1 percent cash rebate card.  

I stated that we can choose a non-profit organization to allocate our cash rebate to.  Which is correct.

What I did not state is, both the individual and the non-profit organization receive the 1 percent cash rebate. 

If you want to allocate your cash rebate, go on Ray’s website, or go to a store location to make a selection from the list of registered organizations.  

Pennies for Pooches/Curry County Animal Shelter is registered.

To add us to the cash rebate, please enter our telephone number, 541-247-2514, on your application.

Thanking you,

Carole Meuret

Pennies for Pooches volunteer   

Gold Beach

 

 

community welcome 

The Brookings-Harbor Redshirts are having a Welcome Home Party for two local Brookings soldiers who recently returned from Afghanistan — Nathan Bourdalaies and Sarah Braun. 

It will be at the Elks Lodge, downstairs, on March 30 at noon. It is open to the public; you do not need to be an Elk to come. We will be serving a free lunch of hamburgers, hotdogs, potato salad, chili and drinks. 

The Redshirts would like to make this a community event. If you would like to help us show these two local soldiers how proud we are of them please contact the Redshirts by calling Frank at 541-412-7545 or emailing This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it  

Remember that our military is still serving in harm’s way, leaving their families behind, living under terrible conditions to keep us safe so we can live in the United States of America, the most awesome country in the world. 

So, join us in welcoming home these two heroes. 

Sharon Hitzman, 

president, 

Brookings-Harbor Redshirts

 

 

clock is ticking

This discussion over tourism dollars has been going on for almost a year now, and this is what Mr. Milliman’s committee comes up with — a “YouTube.” 

The fact is that no one has given the Chamber of Commerce credit for all the tourism promotion they do and have done. Here is a list of where The Brookings Harbor Chamber Of Commerce spends tourism advertising dollars: Festivals and Events, visitor and relocation packets, outdoor sportsman shows, Oregon Coast Magazine, Mile By Mile Guide, Oregon Travel Planner, Travel Oregon website, Curry Coastal Pilot Vacation Guide, Charter Media television marketing, Southern Oregon Visitors Association, South Coast Partnership Co-op, Co-Op N. California Travel Shows with SOVA, Travel Oregon state welcome centers. 

If you really want to see what the Chamber of Commerce does, go into their website. It’s very informative: www.brookingsharborchamber.com. When I travel I always check with the local Chamber of Commerce. I have found that they are the best informed about community places and events. That’s how I came from Central Oregon to live in Brookings Harbor.

Tourism season is upon us and Milliman’s committee is just getting around to advertising. This affects the whole community. 

The Tourism Clock is ticking, and it takes time to get advertising going. Tic Tock .

Naoma Fick 

Brookings Harbor

 

 

another thought

Just think!

The residents and voters of Curry County had the opportunity to elect Greg Empson to our county commission.

Instead, thanks to so many of our gullible fellow citizens, look at what we wound up with!

Another thought — (not a new idea), what would be wrong with having a part-time, citizens county commission and a full-time, professional county manager?

Rafael Kosche

Harbor

 

 

great store support

The response by the community to our new Habitat Store has been amazing. We so appreciate everyone’s support. 

Many people have brought donated items to be sold. If you make a donation, we will gladly give you a receipt for tax purposes.

The proceeds from sales will be going toward “Brush With Kindness Projects” (ABWK) for low income, elderly or those with disabilities that are not able to do their own home building or repair projects. Applications for ABWK projects are available at the Habitat Store or call Curry County Habitat at (541) 412-7166.

Individuals may also donate to Habitat by depositing empty printer ink cartridges in our recycling box at the store or by donating a used vehicle in the name of Curry County Habitat. Donating a car is easy to do by calling (877) 277-4344. The vehicle will need to have fully inflated tires to enable loading onto a tow truck that will be dispatched to your location. This is a great tax write-off also.

Habitat would like to again thank the Pilot for the great coverage of our new store, and the community and Home Depot for their continued support. 

We hope to see you often at our store located at the AAA Stor-All at the corner of Highway 101 and Oceanview Dr. in Harbor. Store hours are every Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Janis Barr, VP 

Curry County Habitat for Humanity

Harbor

 

 

we’re no i-5 big city

Curry County and Brookings city officials, in my opinion, do not understand our environment, and many citizens for that matter don’t either. 

Brookings is a remote small village in Curry County on the coast. There is no comparison with Medford, Grants Pass, Salem, etc., in terms of a population base on which taxes can be levied. 

Unfortunately, many of the financial issues in our area are caused by leaders and some residents wanting to spend our tax dollars like we are a city on the I-5 corridor. A couple of examples: tower behind City Hall, new patrol cars, a new building in the parking lot at City hall (unknown use), a water tanker for the fire station (the old one never moved), bike paths, and water/sewer lines paid for developers. And then there is the Salmon Run golf course which we underwrite for the wealthier folks in our community. Make them pay their way.

Most in Curry County are retired and on fixed incomes. Jobs for those working are predominantly low pay.

We cannot afford “Big City” spending. Let’s get serious. Where is the TEA party?

So ... let’s consolidate the three school systems in the county (GB, B & PO). Let’s consolidate the four police forces in the county, perhaps use State Police outside of incorporated areas like Alaska does. Quit buying every sexy new toy the big boys do.

We live in the boonies, folks, and have no Tax Cows. Get used to it, or leave.

Mike Schrum

Brookings

 

 

neither one am i

Neither Neanderthal nor Yahoo am I — the names that people from Selma and Eugene used to describe people in Curry County. 

They think Brookings “exists only because of tourism.” That might be true today, but not much longer if the extreme environmentalists have their way. 

They closed timbering, created marine reserves and are trying to close off access to rivers. When the tourists come to Curry County in the future, they can look at the waves. Sounds like the place I would NOT spend my hard earned money.

We still have the very few extreme environmentalists that try to convince the majority of people that dirt and oil from the roads, fertilizers from the fields, seepage from riverside septic fields and  bird poop washed into the Chetco during winter rains will not contaminate their drinking water, but a “yahoo” with a dirty truck or a miner searching for gold will. The water filtration systems that are in place do a great job, summer or winter.  

I say KUDOS to our city council for telling it like it is! We can’t afford to shut down, close off or restrict any more areas to the people. The tourists come here to enjoy our area, the same as we do. Not everyone who visits wants to go salmon fishing; it might be hiking, camping, trying gold prospecting, beachcombing or any myriad of activities. 

Brookings and Curry County cannot afford to alienate anyone who wants to come and spend their money here. We need to encourage more activities in our area, not less.

The extreme environmentalists tell us it is for the “kids of the future.” Well, what about the kids that are here now?

Dianna Blazo

Brookings