Letters to the Editor published Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Written by The Curry Coastal Pilot August 08, 2012 12:21 pm

 

Just need a place to park my home

Editor: 

I am sick and tired of these RV parks in this area telling me I can’t park in their park because my RV is more then 10 years old or less. 

I need a address for my meds that I can’t get because I can’t find a place to stay to get my life back together. Instead, I have to park at the side of the road or rest areas or even find a nice quite area to park at. I go into an RV park that has lots of open spaces. However, I get told I don’t fit their clientele or my RV is too old. But the one that gets me is when I am told sorry but we only allow 10 years and newer that is the rock-bottom upsetting. 

So I ask this question: Is there anyplace a Gulf War vet can park their home so life is not so upsetting? The RV park wants to fill those spots and cry that they can’t afford having them empty. So why don’t they fill them and quite whining about the 10 years or newer and fill those spaces with paying customers instead. 

So if you see an RV parked at the side of the road be nice to it and think of some where I can live in peace. 

Chris Teague, 1954 GMC PD 4104 RV 

Brookings

Spend money on vocational courses

Editor:

A while ago I wrote a letter about a conversation I overhead while sitting in a booth at McDonald’s.  

Five high school boys and girls were complaining about the courses. A few of the boys said they wanted to learn about auto mechanics or working on planes. The girls wanted to learn how to make their own clothes to possibly going into the fashion field in the future. They also wanted to learn how to cook and bake with the possibility of becoming caterers or working in restaurants. One of the boys said he didn’t think that algebra would help him get a job if he wanted to work on autos or planes.

There are many high schools that have vocational courses and wanted to know why where aren’t any here. This conversation took place a few years ago as well as well as anything to do during school vacations and the end of the school term. Nothing ever came out of those conversations and no new courses were offered.

Now, all of a sudden I see letters about keeping the older students more interested in staying in school and having things to do besides just “hanging out” in front of KFC and McDonald’s. Again, were any of the students asked for their ideas?

I would rather see money being spent on these vocational courses rather than on an enlarged bike path. Perhaps I am very wrong. Am I?

Gerry Kass  

Harbor

Hey bad guys, good will prevail!

Editor:

The bad (or mad) man in Colorado who shot so many people may have a fan in Brookings.

The same movie playing in Colorado in the theatre where the killings took place was shown in Brookings.

At night, about a block from the Brookings movie theatre, off the main street, someone cut the tires of a whole bunch of cars. I live about three blocks away. Two cars on my street were also hit, to include my own car.

I suspect that the person(s) lives on the same street that I do, but at the other end of the block. I don’t have any idea who it was.

I received a series of reports when I took my car into the tire place. I was told that a number of cars were likewise attacked on Wharf Street. When I called the police dispatcher to report the vandalism to my car, I was told that a lot of cars at the Mazda dealership were hit. At that point, I thought someone was mad at the car dealership. But then I fond out that a number of cars were also hit at the home health care place, approximately one-half block from the dealership. I also found out that a second car on my street was hit. Then I came up with the speculation that the perpetrator(s) was not mad at the car dealership but attacked there because of proximity to the movie theatre, combined with nobody being around there at night.

The heroes we choose to emulate should be heroes, not villains. And, in case the vandal has not notice, the good guys do prevail in the end.

Tom Anderson

Brookings

A happily ever after for pit bull Buddy

Editor: 

 We just wanted to let everyone know that the brindle pit bull, aka “Buddy,” is back with the Humane Society and has a family waiting to adopt him. 

We are all so thankful that he is safe and will have a Happily Ever After with his new family. 

Good Luck, Buddy, from your friends, 

Sue Ross and the staff at Gerald Ross Insurance,

 Terre Hodges and staff at Edward Jones 

Brookings

 

Bomb scare leaves me rolling on floor

Editor: 

I read today’s account about the backpack found and disabled by the bomb squad. 

This sounds just like something out of the Three Stooges. 

The part about the 16 year old being knocked unconscious running into a post, and being left there lying on the ground by his friends. The part about the bomb squad being out of cell phone range, the part about the kid’s backpack being taken behind a dumpster by the robot and shaken – I was just rolling on the floor. 

Very exciting ... wow.

Melissa Bishop 

Smithville, Texas

Fact-check letter before believing

Editor:

The letter to the editor from Paul E. Milazzo; (Pilot, July 28) is a typical example of two things that are an ongoing problem at the Pilot.

Someone gets an email containing false information from God only knows where, accepts what it says as gospel, then goes hysterically about the serious business of spreading the word to everyone else by penning a letter to the editor;

The Pilot does little or no fact checking before it prints it, thus helping to spread misinformation that could be truly upsetting to certain segments of the local population. 

The fact is that the part of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Obamacare) that becomes effective Jan. 1, 2013, does not impose a sales tax on “houses, condos, rental income, etc.” What the act does do is impose a 3.8 percent tax on investment incomes that exceed $200,000 for single persons and $250,000 for married couples. Investment income could include the profit (not the sale price) from the sale of a home, but another law that has been in effect for years grants tax exemptions that make the first $250,000 for (single person) or $500,000 (married couple) of the profit from the sale of a home non-taxable. Unless your investment income exceeds these limits, you are home free! 

Carl Dunbar 

Harbor

Hold Sutter Coast board accountable

Editor: 

On the Sutter Coast  (Hospital) website, I pulled up the list of the board of directors and what I would call their “mission statement.” 

It says “they help to ensure Sutter Coast Hospital continues to enhance the health and well being of the citizens of Del Norte and Curry counties, as well as visitors seeking our services.” 

The recent position the board has taken to regionalize the hospital would indicate they are not fulfilling their job. Three local and respected physicians have taken strong positions against regionalization The board has voted for regionalization. I believe they have a duty to tell us, the citizens of Del Norte and Curry counties, why and also why they believe all the local opposition is wrong. 

If you take a position that affects the entire county, you should at least own up to your position and tell us the logic in your decision. Hospital board, it is time you faced the public in a public meeting and explain your position. And also explain to us why employees of Sutter Coast Health can sit on the board and vote on a decision that turns ownership of multi-millions of dollars worth of real estate and assets over to themselves. It’s like a property management company making the decision that the property owner must give them his property. If  this situation is not somehow illegal, it is at very best disgustingly immoral! 

You have been sitting behind a cloud of secrecy and non-disclosure for too long now. Perhaps the sensible approach is to change your vote not to regionalize at this time, but carefully explore the ramifications fully, and with local citizen input and then revisit the issue next year. 

Unlike Nancy Pelosi, it is not a good time to pass this so you can see what is in it! 

Jay and Nancy Chernak

Crescent City

Solving county’s fiscal crisis. Really?

Editor: 

Re: your Aug. 1 editorial, “County may take another step toward disaster.” Your editorial accuses two of the four county commissioner candidates of being “no-shows in a leadership role” simply because they did not appear in front of the board of commissioners (BOC) when they were “asked” to do so. 

The other two candidates that did appear were found to be lacking as one didn’t air his ideas at that time, and the fourth, “while offering ideas didn’t offer much hope.” 

Let’s see. This is the same BOC that did not let two of the current candidates serve on the Citizens Advisory Committee formed to offer solutions to the county’s financial crisis because they were commissioner candidates. Then, when a third current candidate announced that he was going to run for county commissioner, he was removed from the Citizens Advisory Committee, which he was a member of at the time. 

Now, Rhodes and Waddle, the two losers of the primary election that are sitting on the BOC, are demanding that the four current county commissioner candidates appear in front of them and offer their ideas to solve the county’s fiscal crisis? 

Really?

Linda Elfman 

Pistol River

Get rid of governor, Defazio? You bet!

Editor:

It’s not very often that I completely agree with Joe Thomas, who sometimes writes incendiary letters to the Pilot, but his recent letter against the Mexican Matricula Consuler ID and which suggested the impeachment of Governor Kitzhaber and criticized Peter DeFazio, earns my wholehearted support.   

I would even assist Joe in removing the DeFazio bumper sticker from his car when he thinks it’s time.

Martin J. Sullivan

Brookings

Children need school clothing

Editor:

It is that time of year again: Back to school! 

Most kids can’t help getting excited about the return to school. New teachers, new classes, and for lots of kids, new clothes, however, for some kids, the return to school is cause for worry and embarrassment. There are children in Curry County’s foster care system that won’t have any new clothes for school and who barely have clothes at all. There are children with a single set of clothing, to be worn to school every day.

There are kids wearing shoes that are sizes too small, and jeans that have been long outgrown. Some children don’t have clothes to protect them from the wind or rain that are so much a part of winter in Curry County. Budgets are tight for everyone, businesses and families, but despite tough economic times we don’t want to ignore kids going without.

There are organizations that take clothes and shoes to third-world countries, a very worthy cause, but what about our kids here in Curry County? As a community we have an opportunity to help a group of kids in Curry County feel comfortable, confident, and happy when they go back to their classrooms in September.

“Attire to Inspire” is a donation program with (items collected) at Chetco Federal Credit Union Branches in Brookings, Harbor, Gold Beach and Port Orford. Specific ages and sizes will be available at each Chetco Federal Branch listed above.

If you would like to donate without purchasing clothing please contact Mona Chandler at 541-698-8086 or Karlie Wright at 541-373-0274. 

We appreciate any and all donations to this cause!

Mona Chandler,

CASA director

Karlie Wright,

Commission on Children and Families

Dog Days Afternoon
& Mutt Strutt 

Editor:

On Sunday, Aug. 12, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., the South Coast Humane Society is putting on their Annual Dog Days Afternoon & Mutt Strutt Fundraiser. 

We invite you all to the Boardwalk at the Port of Brookings Harbor for the festivities. This is one of the ways money is raised to enable the South Coast Humane Society to care for the dogs and cats (occasionally rabbits and goats) in their care.

There will be games for the kids, dog training demos, Ask the Trainer booth, vendors, raffles and free hot dogs AND the Mutt Strutt. Enter your dog in the category of your choice; Biggest Dog/Smallest Dog, etc. Each dog entered will receive a commemorative bandana. The Best in Show will receive a basket of prizes donated by Jason Ramsey from tHE sALTY dOG cOFFEE bAR (Jason’s typing). He will also assemble a panel of independent (unbribable) judges.

South Coast Humane Society invites you all to attend and have fun; of course bring your dog (on a leash, please) and your children (leash optional).

Any questions, please call the SCHS at 541-412-0325.

Glenda Weber, member

South Coast Humane Society