Letters to the Editor published Saturday, June 30, 2012

By The Curry Coastal Pilot June 29, 2012 09:00 pm

 

Tethering dog in truck not enough

Editor: 

Sometime ago a letter was written about chairs and a dog flying out of the back of a pickup.  

The writer of the letter encouraged humans to tether their dogs while they are riding in the back of a truck.  Today, while driving north on Highway 101, a red pickup was stopped, waiting to enter Highway 101. His/her dog was tethered in the back of the pickup, but loose enough so it could jump out of the side and hang near the right rear tire of the truck. 

The human made his right turn onto Highway 101 unaware that he was dragging his dog. He immediately pulled over; we can only hope/pray that the dog was not hurt too badly.  

Due to traffic, unfortunately we could not stop.  Please remember that, if your dog is riding in the back of a vehicle, tethering is not enough; make sure they can not reach the side of the truck.

Lana Brock

Brookings


Benefit golf event set for July 14

Editor: 

Dear Curry County Residents, On July 14, 2012, the Curry County Commission on Children & Families will be holding the Second Annual Benefit Golf Tournament at Salmon Run Golf Course in Brookings. 

The tournament raises money for programs such as CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate), the SWOCC parenting programs and Time Flies Youth Organization. This event was tremendously successful in its first year and has high hopes of doing even better this year, but we need your help! We need golfers! Salmon Run is a beautiful course, and why not enjoy sunshine and play golf while doing something great for our county! 

The entry fee is $115 per person and that includes a sack lunch and catered dinner by C & K Markets. There are great prizes and the weather is sure to be fantastic. 

If you need any additional information please feel free to call Karlie Wright at 541-247-3307.

Karlie Wright prevention specialist/event coordinator Curry County Commission on Children & Families


Backstory on DeFazio invitation

Editor:

Regarding Martin Sullivan’s Letter “If DeFazio can’t run his own office ...” (Pilot, June 23): Here’s some back story.

When I saw the story and ad about Congressman DeFazio being “invited” to the tea party (Pilot June 13), I learned from his campaign office that no letter had been received nor had any follow-up call or email checking on the status of said invitation, been attempted. So, I wrote my letter (Pilot June 16).

At the tea party event, also on June 16, Sue Gold showed me the receipt for her certified letter sent June 1, to “Congressman DeFazio, Eugene, OR,” the city of his congressional office, not his campaign office.

Art Robinson used this opportunity to claim that Congressman DeFazio won’t debate him. That’s simply not true. They participated in four debates prior to the last election. And, in mid-May of this year, Congressman DeFazio  repeated his position of neutral venues for these kinds of meetings and challenged Mr. Robinson to repeat that process again this election year.

For my part, I apologize for not contacting all five DeFazio offices to see if any of them had received such an invitation. And I hope that, because of the importance of staying within the “Congress’ Laws on Ethics” (http://1.usa.gov/MUnbp0) designed to keep congressional and campaign activities and funds totally separate, others will use the appropriate channels for campaign correspondence and invitations, which is DeFazio for Congress, P.O. Box 1316, Springfield, OR 97477 or 541-485-1622.

Anyone who is interested in being “informed” on this issue, a timeline concerning this situation is available at http://bit.ly/L5WH1n

Gordon Clay

Brookings

 

Global health care leaves U.S. behind 

Editor:

Whether or not the individual mandate remains part of the Affordable Care Act, Americans across the country and across the political spectrum are waking up to the realization that the only practical and cost-effective way to make health care work is to cover everyone.

An article written by Noam Levey (Los Angeles Times, May 12, 2012) tells us the rest of the world is moving in the direction of providing medical insurance for all their citizens while this country is mired in the mud of political indecision and corporate control of health care.  Other countries, including China, Mexico, Thailand and even Ghana and Rwanda (!) are providing universal health care to their populations. These and many other countries are moving in this direction because they understand that creating universal healthcare systems are a necessity for long-term economic growth.

Just to give one example: According to a recent report by the World Health Organization, the U.S. spends $7,000 per capita on health care. In comparison, Thailand gives its citizens prescription medicines, ambulatory care, hospitalization and disease prevention as well as radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgical operations and critical care for accidents and emergencies; and it does all of this spending only U.S. $136 per capita. We do not have the best health care in the world, just the costliest – by far.

If the Affordable Care Act is overturned, it gives us another opportunity to build a health care system that is universal in scope and that will improve lives, not impoverish them.

Eileen Sorrels

Harbor 

Thinking of me in a positive way

Editor: 

I was so surprised to see that some lovely person or persons spent their time and money to place a very nice public notice in the paper for me. 

I tried to wrangle the name of the person, or persons from the staff, but the Pilot thought it would be better to ensure their anonymity, and rightfully so. 

So I wish to thank the person or people for thinking of me in a positive way. I am more than rewarded just by your smiles, waves, and love. 

Ira Tozer

Brookings 

 

Time for hospitals to merge, partner

Editor: 

With the recent articles of Curry Health Network and Sutter Coast Hospital in financial troubles, I can’t help but to bring this up.  

This is the prefect opportunity for each entity to approach Rogue Valley Medical Center and Providence Medford Medical Center for a possible merger or partnership. Since both hospitals work closely, with frequent patient transfers for a higher level of care up to Medford, it would be in everyone’s best interest.

Sutter Coast doesn’t need Mother Sutter, nor pay over $1 million just to use the name.

Now is the time for both Crescent City and Gold Beach to take the Win Win step forward for all.

Mark St James

Brookings

 

Cart racks, handicap parking and car help 

Editor: 

For convenience sake I would like to see some of the cart racks and the handicapped parking be adjacent to each other at Ray’s and Fred Meyer.

Would love to have a car care center that is primarily for the women in town who own automobiles and need assistance in caring for their vehicles. Providing preventive care, such as checking batteries, tires, fluid levels, etc. 

There are many women in town who do not have any assistance in caring for their cars on a regular basis. Would save many expensive repairs and resulting stress.

Polly Houghtaling

Brookings 

 

Dogs, homeless defecating on town 

Editor: 

To the persons walking their dogs on Tuesday afternoon in front of Rancho Viejo restaurant, you should be fined for not picking up after your dog. 

I know who you are and when I confront you I will hold you there until law enforcement comes to cite you. I have photos of you. 

By the looks of both of you I’m almost sure you have no home; the homeless are literally defecating on Brookings. 

Please be vigilant and stop this disease in its tracks. 

Gary Del-Abate 

Harbor

 

Lack of morals and compassion

Editor: 

A bred and born Oregonian, I have a problem with the values of a lot of the locals here. Moral and education importance seems to be lacking. 

Not too long ago a fellow wrote a letter to the editor about the bad food served here in our restaurants He was immediately chastised and moved away. However, I agreed with him (although I  said or did nothing). There is also a problem with customer  service. I see employees talking to one another and acting resentful if they are interrupted. 

Every time I hear “There’s no hurry, you’re in Curry,” I want to scream. I’ve always been proud that I am a retired cabinetmaker, but it’s easier to keep my mouth shut here because of the “good old boy” mentality. 

The other thing that really bothers me is the lack of compassion for children and animals. I now house and feed eight cats, seven of which showed up sick and hungry. I tried for a year to get something done about the animal hoarder on Benham that included calling every animal agency in the county. I finally got an agent to look into it. He called me back, said he visited the house, and could find nothing wrong. At that point I gave up. 

Our so-called medical center here is really a joke. Anyone who has dealt with them knows how mismanaged the place is. I am just lucky to have a very reputable nurse practioneer. 

I do enjoy the Pilot, look forward to the mornings when it comes (and for the last year has never failed to arrive). I read all of the columns and would like to see more informative types of articles. I enjoy Ragged Right.The man is an animal lover (which endears me) and most importantly, he has heart. 

I do feel safe here (except for some of the senior drivers). I stay because of the mild weather and I’m just getting too damned old to move. 

Barbara J. Parrett-Eary

Harbor 

 

Parents, businesses make party a hit 

Editor:

Recently I had the privilege of working with a very dedicated group of parents of our Brookings-Harbor High School graduating class of 2012.

A wonderful “Graduation, All Night Party” was given to show our young adults that they are valued and worth celebrating. Darryl Miller, and his crew at Wild River Pizza, gave up an evening of business to allow parents to come in and transform the Pizza Parlor into an event that went into the wee hours of the morning. It brought games, food, ice cream, photos and entertainment not to mention the wonderful gifts each of our seniors received.

The gifts were donated, and purchased in our community, after fundraising by our local merchants and parents, creating resources for the big event.

I want to personally thank the board parents who took the reins to start the process back in October of 2011, and all the folks who stepped up along the way to bring this successful and sober evening to our kids.

As a grandparent, and one who got to share the entire evening first-hand, thanks for giving our young adults a wonderful, safe environment to celebrate the next chapter in their lives.

The students were awesome, polite, and fun to be with. ALL OF THEM!

Dianne Knudsen,

grandparent of a

graduating senior

Brookings