Letters to the Editor published Saturday, April 14, 2012
Written by The Curry Coastal Pilot   
April 13, 2012 08:52 pm

 

Folks step up and help the food bank

Editor: 

Once again this wonderful community has come forward and met a great need. 

Our local food bank has really been going through some tough times. Historically, donations are always down during the winter months, our delivery trucks are sporadic because of weather and our supplies at an all-time low. 

To the rescue came the Lion’s Club, Harbor port businesses, and of course the wonderful people who bring in donations on a regular basis. 

Thank you does not seem enough, but it is heartfelt. 

David Allen and staff, George and all the Lions’ members and all of the community (you know who your are) that keep our doors open, we love and appreciate you more than can be expressed here. 

We continue to add new families every week, and could not serve them without your caring help!

Maureen Kee, 

Food Bank volunteer 

Brookings 

 

A huge thank you for finding my dog

Editor: 

On Saturday, April 7, my beloved 12-year-old little dog somehow escaped the yard. 

Two wonderful twin sisters named Briana and Felicia spotted Lily walking down Oceanview Drive, heading for Highway 101. They stopped and picked her up. 

Fortunately Lily wears a tag with her name and phone number. Briana and Felicia immediately called me and reassured me that Lily was just fine. They then went out of their way to bring Lily home. 

I wish to thank them from the bottom of my heart. If they hadn’t stopped, I dread to think of what would have happened. What special young people we have here in Brookings-Harbor! 

Thank you again, Briana and Felicia. 

Linda Creps

Harbor 

 

Stagelights, music and the community

Editor:

2012 is turning into a banner year for the nonprofit organization Stagelights Musical Arts Community. 

Many Curry County residents and businesses have donated money, time and products to help us in our various efforts to provide music education, outreach and entertainment for people of all ages.

Thank you!

As Stagelights enters its third year we have streamlined our operations and mission, and found a new home, thanks to the generosity and cooperation of the Chetco Cove Yacht Club at the Port of Brookings Harbor. 

Stagelights has narrowed its focus to three specific areas: Music education for our children, music opportunities for the community at large, and concerts featuring high-quality touring artists. 

At Kalmiopsis Elementary School, which no longer has a music program, we have brought in local musicians to perform, hosted workshops and answered students’ questions in an effort to foster early music appreciation. We also launched a recorder class for fourth graders that teaches basic music fundamentals. In March, the Brookings-Harbor School District honored Stagelights with a Distinguished Service Recognition Award! 

For the community we offer monthly open mic and jam nights for musicians young and old, of all skill levels, who perform for appreciative crowds. We provide affordable group lessons for beginning musicians and host music events that showcase the region’s best local acts.

Our most recent effort is the Stagelights House Concert Series featuring intimate, living room-style concerts with a potluck and performance by high-quality touring artists. The first two events were sellouts and we have seven more shows scheduled this year.

Stagelights knows how important music is to the education, health and well-being of people, especially during these trying time. 

Find out more about what we do – and how you can help – by visiting www.stagelights.us.

Michelle Later and

Laurie Calef

Stagelights

board members

 

Standing room only the best compliment

Editor: 

Standing room only Friday night at Salty Dog for Rudy and Friends. 

Wow! Bless your hearts and thanks for your support. I had moved all the tables out and put folding chairs any place they would fit, and still not enough room. 

One of the highlights was 5-year-old Silas playing the hillbilly harp (jaw harp). He played with the Old Time Fiddlers when they were here. So not only does he tug on your heartstrings, the young man can really play. So it’s going to be a joy watching him grow musically. 

As for the rest of the crew, we play three to five days a week for nursing homes, senior centers, schools, fundraising for community needs, etc., under the direction of Mr. Carl Rovainen. 

“Standing Room Only” are three words every entertainer longs to hear. I was overwhelmed and humbled at the same time. We are just local people playing for local people. A people’s band – nothing special. We love the joy of music, and sharing it. We still remember how to have fun. 

I’m still amazed at what a few flyers and word of mouth can do, and for the people that did not get in – I.O.U. 

Next: A ukulele band. So get your ukes, dust them off, tune ’um up and I’ll be in touch. I found you cannot play one without grinning, so keep a grin till then. 

Again, folks, bless your hearts and thanks for your support. So keep a song in your heart till we meet again.

Rudy Glen Spence,

for the gang

Brookings 

Volunteer staff is critical to food bank

Editor:

April 15 begins Volunteer Appreciation week. Our community enjoys volunteer assistance in many areas. Many non-profit organizations are staffed by those who give of their time to help others.

Brookings Harbor Food Bank is one of these organizations. We have a volunteer staff that is the backbone and heart of our charitable activity. This community would not have a food bank that helps our needy families with nutritious food supplies if it were not for our wonderful and caring volunteers. They greet and sign clients in, assist with food box preparations, stock shelves, package dry goods, and clean the warehouse. They smile and empathize with people and know who all the clients are and what they need.  They are a close knit working group.

With deepest appreciation to our special volunteer staff.  You exemplify caring and giving.

Julie Davis, 

executive director

Brookings Harbor Community Helpers Food Bank

 

Panhandling should not be tolerated

Editor: 

I was reading the article about the 10 homeless plan.

I feel that it was a waste of time and money that could go to more important things in Curry County.

I was just up this last weekend to our home in Brookings. I saw a group of the homeless camped out on the side of the Apple Peddler. When the weather permitted they went across the street to mooch at the driveway of the shopping center. I don’t know if the Apple Peddler allowed them to camp out there or they just didn’t care. But I for one would not do business with them if I see that they cannot keep these people off their property.

Down here in California you can’t even go to almost any take-out without having a bunch of these people standing outside mooching money. Fortunately in Brookings, it’s not as bad as it is here. But still, it should not be tolerated. There are laws against panhandling. But unfortunately, the city and county do not even have money to enforce these laws.

Let’s be honest, the majority of the citizens just want them to go somewhere else and be someone else’s problem.Why should Brookings be any different. 

Force these people to move on to Crescent City and let California take care of them. They have more money and means to help these people than we do in Brookings.

Bob Meunier 

Pittsburg, Calif.

Rhodes, Waddle offer true leadership

Editor: 

I strongly support the re-election of Commissioners George Rhodes and Bill Waddle. 

They address long standing county financial problems that existed before they took office. They are courageous. They inform the public about hard and unpopular facts. They make difficult decisions and openly discuss painful and complex issues in transparent public meetings. We need their knowledge and leadership to find real solutions to our financial crisis. 

George Rhodes is a successful commissioner. He led the effort for the county to finally get its fair share of regional mental health funding. This ended years of neglect. He improved the Brookings airport. He’s been passionate in his efforts to create new businesses and family wage jobs. Leaders who are willing to actively lead always run the risk of being criticized. 

Under Rhodes and Waddle, county government has focused on solving problems rather than being a podium for grandstanding and personal feuds. It’s up to the public to stop tolerating endless fault-finding and personal attacks. Watch one of our Board of Commissioner meetings on TV and, whether you agree or disagree with any particular decision, you will witness professionalism. 

True leadership is about facing realities, providing information, and taking steps to create solutions. Curry is fortunate to have capable and knowledgeable commissioners standing up for what they believe in. Stand up for Rhodes and Waddle!

For the record, I am current county employee writing as a private citizen during my off hours.

Jan Kaplan 

Gold Beach