Desserting traditional art

April 13, 2012 09:41 pm

“Incredible Inedibles” are on display at Brian Scott Gallery. No refrigeration required. The Pilot/Lorna Rodriguez
 

Decadent cakes, mouth-watering pies, chocolate-dipped strawberries and colorful sugar cookies are all part of artist Audi Stanton’s newest project, “Incredible Inedibles.”

Incredible Inedibles, Stanton’s “whimsical and humorous” dessert sculptures, are on display and for sale in the Brian Scott Gallery, located at 515 Chetco Ave.

“They’re really fun, and I was hoping to get a good laugh,” Stanton said.

 

 She used two different types of clay, styrofoam, egg cartons, plastic containers, meat trays and all kinds of things to make the pieces, she said. 

In addition to the sculptures, Stanton made oil and watercolor paintings of the desserts.

Stanton spent about three-and-a-half months making all of these detailed desserts and paintings.

Off hand, she was not sure how many she made, but said it was a lot.

Each dessert is decorated as well: Some of the cupcakes have little roses, and Stanton used seed beads for sprinkles on the sugar cookies. 

 Stanton thought of the idea while painting with friends one day.

Her friend Kathy brought in a dessert that the group painted and ate.

Stanton then remarked that she would love to paint desserts, but didn’t want to eat them.

 “I just wanted to start making my own little desserts,” she said.

Her favorite part was making the pies, pie slices and sponge cake.

“But they all were fun to make,” Stanton was quick to add.

Stanton, who usually creates two-dimensional work, branched out with this project.

“The three-dimensional work for me is new, and I really enjoy it,” she said. “I really, really think it’s fun to do.”

Stanton decided to create the exhibit because she hadn’t seen anything like it done before, she said.

Brian Scott Gallery manager Christina Olsen, who invited Stanton to show her work, likes how unique and delicious-looking the sculptures are. 

“She took (the project) to a fine-art form,” Olsen said. “She painted portraits of the pieces, made cards, she took it to an incredible extreme. She really turned it into quite an event all on its own. I thought we should showcase it and validate her efforts.”

Incredible Inedibles will be on display until the end of this month.

“What I was after was fun. Nothing serious. Just light-hearted art,” Stanton said.