Letters to the Editor published Wednesday, January 25, 2012

By The Curry Coastal Pilot January 25, 2012 03:36 am

 

Low taxes? You get what you pay for

Editor: 

If Curry County residents don’t raise property taxes to support local services there is not going to be any services. 

We have a community group of volunteers to aid county commissioners in finding solutions to the local problem. So far they are finding that there is no way to cut services enough to allow for bare minimum sheriff patrols, jail and court and other basic services. Sixty dollars per thousand is a ridiculously low tax for public services. 

Until we attempt to pay our own way we are not going to receive any sympathy from urban taxpayers. We cannot expect while paying such a low tax rate that we are going to get much help from state and federal agencies. I don’t like paying taxes anymore than others do but this time it is necessary. I am on a fixed income and really don’t want to pay more taxes, but if we are going to have services we may get what we pay for.

L. Sanborn

Brookings 

 

Seeking donations for sound system

Editor:

For the last two years, the Brookings-Harbor community has been extremely generous to Stagelights Musical Arts Community as it has endeavored to provide much-needed music education and outreach in the public schools and the community. 

Thank you! It is much appreciated.

We now have an opportunity to purchase a used sound system that would help Stagelights continue to host music events and classroom and youth music activities in 2012. 

We have received a donation of $250, but need another $750 to complete the purchase. Any and all donations would be greatly appreciated. Stagelights is a 501(c) nonprofit organization and all donations are tax deductible.

Please bring donations to Michelle Later at the Harbor branch of Chetco Federal Credit Union. Checks can be made payable to Stagelights Musical Arts Community.

This year promises to be a very exciting year for Stagelights. We will continue to bring professional musicians into Kalmiopsis Elementary School to perform and teach children about music. We have scheduled a series of low-cost, group music lessons in which groups of up to 12 people at a time can learn a new musical instrument. 

We will host community open mic nights on the third Saturday of every month. We have scheduled several community music showcases featuring local talent of all ages. Also, we are currently planning and seeking grant money for at least two summer music camps for local youth and adults.

For more information about Stagelights, visit ourwebsite: www.stagelights.us, or our Facebook page. You can also leave a message by calling 541-469-8832 or send an email to This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Michele Later,

treasurer

Stagelights Musical Art Community 

 

Editorial cartoon message unclear

Editor:

I have always enjoyed a clever cartoon that contains a subtle message revealing some shortfall in our society.  

But Scott, I cannot be sure I can figure out the message in the cartoon (Pilot Jan. 21).  Since you have allowed your paper to publish a cartoon indicating the GOP debate is apparently the program that is so distasteful to the axe wielder that he is trying to cut the TV cord off, one must conclude he’s a Democrat.  

Are you really trying to demonstrate to your readers that Democrats are so inept that they don’t know how to turn off their TV or change the channel?

Warren Glaze

Brookings

 

This is No-Name Calling Week

Editor

January 23 through 29 is No-Name Calling Week. 

What we know is that children and youth who are bullied need clear messages of support from adults. Although we want children to be strong and assertive so that they can stand up to those who bully, adults must realize that many children aren’t ready to do this. Adults play critical roles in helping children who are bullied and creating a healthy, safe climate in the community and within our schools.

As adults, we may feel uncertain about how to handle bullying when we see or hear it happening. Or we may respond in ways that don’t make the best use of the opportunity to teach a young person the difference between appropriate and inappropriate behavior. We could end up inadvertently promoting, rather than reducing bullying.

Go to bit.ly/zoxS1d for some tips to help respond more effectively on-the-spot and make the best use of the “teachable moment” with all students in our community and in our schools.

Here are some suggested lesson plans for elementary level: http://bit.ly/7UxtRi; middle level: http://bit.ly/qGNvU; and high school lesson plans: http://bit.ly/bwqXQT.

It’s time to launch an on-going dialogue about ways to eliminate all kinds of name-calling and bullying in Curry County.

Gordon Clay

TheCitizensWhoCare.org

Brookings