Letters to the Editor published Wednesday, December 14, 2011
Written by The Curry Coastal Pilot   
December 13, 2011 10:41 pm

 

Jesus is not the only reason for season

Editor:

Jesus is not the only reason for the season.

Before my ancestors were forcibly converted to Christianity, we celebrated the winter solstice and many other religions and unbelievers continue to do so today.

The winter solstice was stolen by the Catholic church and replaced with the alleged birthday of Jesus whose real birthday, if there was one, is not known.

The first amendment to our constitution says, ”Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion. ...”

To place any religious symbol , creche, menorah, cross, crescent and star on public land is a violation of that amendment.

It’s not true that children are forbidden to pray in school, however they cannot lead their class in prayer and neither may the teacher in a public school lead the class in prayer.

A child can pray at any time and place in school as long as he doesn’t interfere with the rights of others.

A non-sectarian greeting admits that other religions and peoples do not all celebrate the Christian holiday.

So let’s be inclusive and great each other with “Happy holidays,” unless of course you know the religion of the other person; but please don't assume everyone you meet is a Christian.

I am proud to be a atheist, a non-believer in ancient myths; however, I would never do anything to prevent you from practicing your religion as long as you don’t forbid me to not practice yours.

Happy holidays everyone!

Sheila Chambers

Brookings

 

God gave Israel to the Jews

Editor:

Not one has mentioned that God gave Israel to the Jews, “A land of milk and honey to be theirs forever.”

The boundaries are set in Numbers 34:3-12, which include Gaza and the West Bank.

No, not one has witnessed!

Thomas Holden, 

a Christian

Harbor

 

Pregnancy Care Center helps many

Editor:

Saturday, Dec. 10, the Pregnancy Care Center had a Christmas event called “Give the Gift of Life.” It was a Christmas dessert and appetizers benefit designed to inform and to raise money for our center. 

It was a beautiful evening with both candlelight and icicle lighting illuminating the social hall at First Baptist Community Church of Brookings. Steve Braun gave an insightful message. In the background, classical Christmas music was being played on the piano by a very talented teenager named Joe Schafer. ·The atmosphere warmly embraced the sights and sounds of the Christmas season. Several people who came said it had a strong community feel. Many people stayed after the event to enjoy socializing with each other.

The Pregnancy Care Center is open to all women. We offer free and confidential pregnancy tests, peer counseling, prenatal classes, parenting classes and both baby and maternity clothes from our Mommy Market. The Pregnancy Care Center is located at 344 Pacific Avenue in Brookings. Our doors are open Tuesdays from 1:30 to 4:30; then, with earlier times on Wednesdays and Thursdays, from 11:30 to 3:30.

We need donations of baby clothes, baby furniture, diapers and wipes. Cash donations are always accepted and appreciated.

Karen Kirkendall,

developmental director

Pregnancy Care Center

Brookings

 

Coming to the rescue, as always

Editor:

I would like to thank Catherine Powers of the animal shelter in Gold Beach for coming to the rescue as she always does.  

One of our neighbors had a little doggie that she took because of a tragic situation. She could not keep the little one as she has already three of her own which she had rescued before. Our neighbor called Catherine and she happened to be in the area at the time and she said to bring it down right away.  

Catherine without any doubt loves all animals and she shows it by her actions and her continual devotion. There are some who say, “Oh yeah, I like animals,” but their actions tells a whole different story.  She is loved and respected by so many people.  Our sweet, four-legged friends may not be able to say it in words, but when Catherine looks into those beautiful grateful eyes that they all have ... that tells it all.  

All animals can see more with their loving hearts and trusting hearts than we can see with our eyes. If only we, as humans, would pay more attention to the devotion animals give so unselfishly and so freely, we may even become better people and in return make this world a better place.  

Please spay and neuter your pets and let’s all work toward no more homeless animals. Thank you.

Beverly Duncan

Brookings

 

Effects of suction dredging on fish

Editor: 

The Dec. 3 article “Miners Fear Government” failed to describe the lethal effects of suction dredging to Chinook salmon. 

Forest Service research scientists Bret C. Harvey and Thomas E. Lisle found that when Chinook salmon spawn among tailings deposited by suction dredges, the eggs survive at a lower rate. The inevitable streambed disturbance from suction dredging results in fewer baby salmon swimming downstream to the ocean each year. I do not think we have any salmon eggs to waste on recreational suction dredging for gold. The 1999 article is titled “Scour of Chinook Salmon Redds on Suction Dredge Tailings” and can be found online. 

Suction dredges often cause unsightly plumes of muddy water for several hundred feet below the dredge. Salmon have high production rates in rivers such as the Chetco because clear water allows the newborn salmon to feed efficiently and grow rapidly. Similarly, people have a strong affinity for water contact recreation in clear running rivers such as the Chetco. 

The Forest Service and Congress are right to protect the Chetco River salmon and its exceptional water clarity from harmful suction dredging. 

Richard Nawa 

Grants Pass

 

Alternative strategy to property tax hike

Editor: 

Good News – Bad News.

The good news is a commissioner came up with a logical and sensible, approach to addressing our county’s fiscal challenges. The bad news is, it wasn’t our county commissioners who articulated the proposed course of action. 

It took a Brookings-Harbor Port commissioner to envision a bottoms-up strategy that would unquestionably yield creative alternatives to the singular solution of a property tax increase as advocated and pursued by our current elected officials. 

Our current cadre of commissioners represents the real crisis in Curry County. Fortunately a solution is at hand come November. 

Mike and Sue Adams 

Brookings

 

If you truly believe in Kwanzaa message

Editor: 

To those that choose to celebrate Kwanzaa instead of Christmas, note that Kwanzaa was only invented 45 years ago by a felon that spent time in prison for torturing a woman. It is not based on a historical event that changed all of mankind! 

If you truly do believe in the Kwanzaa message you should also appreciate the fact that African American culture has included Christmas for hundreds of years. And African Christians have been celebrating Christmas since the first century. It is their history, and their culture. 

So how do you say Merry Christmas? I found this convenient list online: in Akan (Ghana) “Afishapa”; in Zimbabwe “Merry Kisimusi”; in Afrikaans (South Africa) “Geseende Kersfees”; in Zulu (South Africa) “Sinifisela Ukhisimusi Omuhle”; in Swazi (Swaziland) “Sinifisela Khisimusi Lomuhle”; in Sotho (Lesthoto) “Matswalo a Morena a Mabotse”; in Swahili (Tanzania, Kenya) “Kuwa na Krismasi njema”; in Amharic (Ethiopia) “Melkam Yelidet Beaal”; in Egyptian (Egypt) “Colo sana wintom tiebeen”; In Yoruba (Nigeria) “E ku odun, e hu iye’ dun!”

T. Beer 

Brookings

 

Thank you, C&K, for the ChariTree event

Editor

Thank You C&K Market for selecting the Brookings Emblem Club to participate in your ChariTree event.  

Our entry ... Santa’s gift to Rudolph his red nosed reindeer ... “A Tree by the Sea” will be displayed at the Chetco Community Public Library, thanks to a winning secret bidder.

Carolene Archuleta, PP Bonnie Jean Bremer, 

co-chairmen

Brookings Emblem Club 265

 

Make it easier to track county agenda 

Editor:

An open letter to the Curry County Board of Commissioners:

Historically, county commissioners have encouraged public participation in the legislative process. 

In 2007, when the public complained about the lack of published agendas for work session meetings, steps were immediately taken to remedy the situation. Adding items after the agenda was published was strongly discouraged and to do so required written justification describing the urgency and signatures from all three commissioners. 

The board took every opportunity to direct citizens to the county web site and invited interested citizens to provide email addresses if they wished to receive public notifications. It took no extra time or effort to include interested citizens when emailing the media with public announcements. 

Now, citizens must attend or at least download the videos to keep up with the items added at virtually every meeting, and courtesy email notifications have been eliminated. Interested citizens must check the county website several times each day to see if a new notice or agenda has been posted. With the surprise topics, frequent special meetings, and the effort required just to find out if there is a meeting at all, participation or possibly influencing a decision is practically impossible. 

I urge the commissioners to provide the public every opportunity to participate in county government by reinstating the courtesy email notifications and by making every effort to avoid adding late items to the agenda after it has been published.

Thank you for your consideration.

Pattie Cook

Gold Beach

 

Donations to Lions Club helps men

Editor: 

My Saturday, Dec. 10, Curry Coastal Pilot brought me a welcome gift for the holidays. 

There on the front page were featured two gentlemen from the Gospel Mission, Rodney Atleson and Roger King. Accompanied by Lion Carol King, it was my privilege to interview and submit the names of these two men to our local Brookings-Harbor Lions Club for glasses. After waiting a few weeks, both men received glasses, which I hope helped them in their quest for education. 

I’m proud to be a member of an organization that assists so many people to obtain glasses, eye surgeries and hearing aids. Lions does vision screening in the schools as well as award scholarships. 

What a gift it was to see Rodney and Roger on the front page of my paper, both looking great in their glasses, by the way. 

During the busy holiday season, don’t forget to deposit your recyclable cans and bottles in our containers. Like everyone, we feel the pinch this year, so money is always welcomed. 

Happy holidays. 

Lion Jan Richey 

Brookings

 

No Pearl Harbor coverage in Pilot

Editor:

Two items in regard to your Dec. 7, 2011, edition. I cannot find one word relating to Pearl Harbor Day, December 7. That day changed America. 

Only about 1.6 million veterans of WWII are still alive after war in Europe and the Pacific. I am one of those because I enlisted in the Navy when I was 17 years old. My Dad and I were watching the Washington State Cougars play Texas A & M in the Stadium Bowl when the strike on Pearl Harbor was announced on the P.A. System. My dad said, “We are at war”.

I have no idea about the number of times in the past or in the future December 7 will fall on a Wednesday but I do hope you will not choose to ignore the day in the future. What a lot of people died for allows you to go to print twice a week.

So that was something not found. Then I did find a comment by an elected commissioner about how the county should re-organize to be properly run. There are several counties in the state with county managers but none are outstanding. There is a large band of people growing as city managers in cities of all sizes and needs, so selecting a good one is possible. That is not the case in county managers. There are very few across the western states and mostly in the large metro areas. There really is no “pool.”

The group of 24 is a grand collection and is moving right along. A series of steps will be presented to the commissioners early in 2012. Hopefully the other three government bodies will work with the county to make it all work.

Paul Fossum

Brookings

 

Things to consider  about county crisis

Editor: 

A few bit of information to add to Curry County’s financial problem discussion: 

1) It has been reported that the potential logging fee income for the County general fund is only about 1/3 of the money received yearly from the federal government and put into the general fund. 

2) When $.60 of tax dollars is discussed, it should be made clear that is only the amount per thousand that goes into the general fund. Our overall property tax rate is greater than $.60 per thousand. 

3) There are 36 counties in Oregon. Nineteen of them have a full time county counsel (including Curry County) Twenty two have full time commissioners (including Curry County). Part time commissioners pay ranges from $12,000 to $35,000. Twenty six of the counties have a county manager/administrator (salaries range from $56,000 to $196,000). Eleven counties employ one commissioner full time as an administrator while (most often) two commissioners are part time. 

4) If your candidate for county commissioner doesn’t have a workable plan for the county’s problems – rethink your choice.

Thomas Brand 

Curry County