Letters to the Editor published Saturday, July 30, 2011

By The Curry Coastal Pilot July 29, 2011 10:04 pm

 

Sailors beware of Rock Nest Monster

Editor: 

I'm not a local; I’ve been coming here every summer for the past six years and have seen and heard of a lot of boats, large and small falling victim to the “Rock Nest Monster” at the mouth of the river. 

It seems to me that most boaters know it’s there and have a mental lapse for what ever reason. 

I believe they need to be marked and marked well but let’s try to remember they are there. 

What are the statistics? Local or visitors boaters? 

Just a thought, T-shirts for Brookings. 

Richard Mueller 

Sioux Falls, S.D.

 

Don’t blame Coast Guard for wreck

Editor:

Re: Mr. Twining (Pilot, July 27), I agree with you regarding the vessel aground, and I, too, am sorry for Mr. Neidorf’s loss. 

Let me provide some legalese to the situation. Those marks as some call them are known as daybreaks. They are legally known as Aids to Navigation; just like the jetty light and dayward, entrance buoys, fog horn and range markers (on towers by the ice house and lower road). The government publishes a book with every federal, state and private Aid to Navigation along our waterways. It is called a Light List.

Other aids are available such as charts, electronics (radar, fathometer, GPS), other publications, lookouts and more. While elements beyond the skipper’s control may have contributed to the accident I do not believe an unmarked rock was the cause. After all, many unfamiliar skippers have safely navigated the channel without it being marked.

The key word here is Aid. That is all a marked rock would be ... just one aid. It is prudent seamanship to use all available navigational assets to make a safe voyage. 

If there is a petition to have the rock marked I’ll sign it, but just don’t blame the U.S. Coast Guard.

Dan Thompson

Rogue Valley

 

No golf courses –  they’re dinosaurs

Editor: 

I hope that the people of Brookings have enough vision to not allow yet another golf course development, especially not by taking state park property! 

The proposed development in Pistol River is bad enough. Golf courses are dinosaurs that require too much water and too many chemicals to maintain. Climate change and peak oil are going to seriously limit both. 

Brookings would be better served by developing more nature-based activities and festivals. You are blessed with incredible natural beauty. Focus on that, and not some artificial playground for rich people. 

I take an interest because my husband and I hope to move there after retirement because of the natural beauty and lack of development.

Irene Schmidt

Mount Horeb, Wis. 

 

Citizens need to share the load

Editor:

If you are a resident of Brookings-Harbor, did you participate in last Saturday’s “Make A Difference” day? 

It is my observation that for most, the answer would be no. Without the hundreds of LDS Church folks who volunteered their time and energy; traveled from a variety of communities, not much would have been accomplished. Yes, I know, there was a three-day event at the port, but the work party was just three hours on Saturday morning.

Let me applaud the groups who faithfully volunteer to: 

1. pick up other people’s trash. By the way, shame on those who do not deal with their own garbage.

2. clean up the beaches. Shame on those who create this need.

3. plant, water, weed, city owned gardens and parks.

4. pick up dog waste. Again, aren’t dog owners responsible for this task?

5. cook and serve food to the needy at the various churches.

I’m sure there are others I have not named.

Perhaps I’m not a reasonable model for volunteerism. I have a job and I volunteer about 10 hours each week maintaining the Azalea Park. I volunteer my talents in other ways, probably for at least another eight hours a month. But surely, I can call upon ordinary citizens to share a little of the load.  

A good start would be to deal properly with your own trash. That alone could free up people for other more creative community projects. Who knows, we might even take the time to teach the younger generations that someday, this beautiful area will all be theirs! Will they shrug and walk away thinking that somebody else will do it, or will they open their eyes and hearts and step up to the bat?

Shirley Hyatt

Brookings


The dark and light side of Brookings

 Editor:

This last beautiful Saturday, July 23, I drove my Vintage 1930 Ford Model A Coupe Deluxe down to the Harbor basin to see the Pirate Festival.  

I found a parking spot a few rows away from the south end concert stage.  

Well, between 1:15-1:45 p.m., some nice person walked by my automobile and deliberately left two nice 8-inch and 10-inch scratches on the driver rear fender. You know who you are. Thank you, to this fine upstanding person. May you be blessed for your kind deed of the day. 

On a lighter side: Avast! Four thumbs up for our local play, “Lady Pirates of the Caribbean.” Shiver me timbers, mateys! Best play we’ve seen here out of our nine years attending the two local playhouses. Come by and drop anchor for the next week’s shows, before they’re sold out. See for yerselves. Support yer locals.  

Mark St.James

Brookings

Cottas are always willing to help

Editor: 

Thank you to Bart and Evelyn Cotta for their help at the Curry Commission on Children & Families First Annual Benefit Golf Tournament held on July 9 at Salmon Run Golf Course. 

Bart, a long time member of the Curry CCF Board, is always ready to help. During the planning Bart stepped forward and contributed his talent as lead singer of the Sans Prophet rhythm and blues, classic rock band to serve as our auctioneer. He drew upon the themes of their recently released CD “Mojo.” Instead of performing his music to move the audience to sing along or tap their feet, he got them to raise their bids. 

Thanks Bart and Evelyn for helping and for your many years of service to children and families in Curry County. 

Myrna Barber

Karlie Wright 

Curry County Commission on 

Children and Families

 

Adjust signal light and save a life

Editor: 

Hey! I have an idea. 

At the corner of Fifth Street and Chetco Avenue (Highway 101) where the slow pedestrians have trouble with the fast cars turning left from Fifth onto the highway: Adjust the left signal light on Fifth to be like the left light signal on Highway 101 at the same corner.

Then the Walk signal won’t come on until the cars turning left have finished their turn.

Whatever the cost, it can't be as much as a lawsuit resulting from an injured – or worse, dead – pedestrian.

Joan Curtis

Brookings

 

How to donate to local food bank

Editor:

We so much appreciate the letter from William West (Pilot, July 27) which talks about the need for donations of food and money to Community Helpers Food Share.

Monetary donations should be sent to P.O. Box 1415, Brookings, OR 97415, rather than to our physical address, 539 Hemlock, where food donations will be gratefully accepted.  

Thank you. 

Julie Davis

Community Helpers Food Share

Brookings

 

Rhodes, stay home and save the money

Editor:

Open letter to Curry County Commissioner George Rhodes.

Dear Commissioner Rhodes,

So I hear that you are going to John Day to present your proposal to the Oregon Parks Commission to swap County lands for a piece of Blacklock State Park on September 21. Please tell me you and David Itzen aren’t going out there on the county’s dime. 

You could have made your presentation to the Parks Commission in Bandon on July 20. Oops. Sorry. I forgot there was a “mix-up” on the amount of time they allotted you. But when you got 15 minutes from the Commission to make your presentation, according to press reports, you decided to talk about “other things.” 

I’m sure it wasn’t a case of “cat got your tongue” (since there was standing room only in Bandon that Wednesday)   and you have always presented yourself as a  straight-talkin’ guy. A skeptical crowd shouldn’t intimidate you.

But John Day? It is 450 miles from home, (a bit farther than the 50 miles to Bandon). A day driving over, a day there, a day driving back. Gas, lodging, meals and time away from real pressing county business. And, little chance that dozens of Curry County citizens will make the trip to learn about your plan to save the county. 

The county is broke and you will be spending scarce county money on unnecessary per-diems on this quixotic quest of yours.

Commissioner Rhodes.  Please say it isn’t true. Stay home, don’t waste money, and please tell us in your straight-talkin’ way, just what is up your sleeve.

Tom Seither

Gold Beach