Letters to the Editor published Saturday, April 16, 2011

Written by The Curry Coastal Pilot April 16, 2011 04:00 am

Not intended to be a factual statement?

Editor:

So, can we finally say with respect to anything a Republican officeholder says in the future, “It was not intended  to be a factual statement...” 

This is a quote from Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl’s office  regarding Kyl’s comments on the Senate floor. I will supply details upon request.

Tom Seither

Gold Beach


Clarifications about Richard Kolb

Editor:

Hello, my name is Dani Kolb, Richard “Rick” Kolb’s wife.

There were a few errors in the last letter (Pilot, April 9) about him, He had more injuries than was listed, He had a fractured skull, a lacerated spleen, a broken eyebrow bone, broken cheek-bone, six broken ribs, broken clavicle, punctured lung, severe laceration to the ear, and subsided brain trauma.

His accident happened here in Brookings, not in his hometown of Sutherlin. The town of Brookings may know him through D.K. Builders.

My husband does not have insurance. Anything helps. Please contact Dani Kolb at 541-254-0082.

Dani Kolb

Brookings


What a week it was in Curry County

Editor:

What a week it was:

A truly honest man, right here in Brookings – I’m speaking about David Pitts, a special person(Pilot, April 9); a well-written letter I’m speaking about Myron Whiting (Pilot, April 9). 

A great cartoon and a good editorial. John Bishop’s comments were on point and justify my belief he has served us well. I found only a half dozen errors in the Pilot, and two dozen program errors in the Guidelines. I am puzzled. According to the Pilot, we lost 6 inches of rain somewhere between March 26, and April  1, not a lot in the scheme of things, but when you think about water supplies and water rates, you might wonder.

Even our commissioners are trying to come up with a way to balance the budget. If you don’t cut salaries and you don’t lay people off, I guess you could change the light bulbs and quit driving public cars to the beauty shop.

Does anyone realize the $3 million shortfall of the 1990s is probably around $4 million more-or-less; more-or-less is like we don’t have it, so it’s not important what the real amount is. Timber payments are, or will be, gone, but the cost of living has not gone up so light bulbs will be cheap.

I was going to buy gold, but after I bought bread and milk, and filled up the gas tank, I bought a lottery ticket. Maybe I’ll share it with the county.

Just maybe.

Clifton Siemens

Brookings 


Stop ‘mulling’ and start doing

Editor:

 I read in this morning (Pilot, April 13) that our county commissioners are still “mulling” consolidating some of our county government departments, like they were doing a couple of issues ago. They’ve been “mulling” the MUMPz (Mixed Use Master Plan zone) for about two years now, and still haven’t done anything as far as going forward with it.

I think it’s time they stopped “mulling” and started doing something!

 I have a suggestion for what they should consider to  consolidate county departments: Consider (seriously) doing away with the board of commissioners, and put that function under the sheriff’s department. After all, he was elected to enforce the law; the board of commissioners spend most their time trying to get around the law (it seems to me).

 That would be a lot more reasonable than taking the department of economic development and combining it with the board of commissioners and  the county counsel.

 It seems that there would be a great opening here for conflict of interest, with the citizens of Curry County coming up short.

 Duncan Lagoe

 Harbor


Our best wishes to Pat Stewart

Editor:

Pistol River Concert Association would like to offer our best wishes to Pat Stewart and to thank her for the years she has allowed Words and Pictures to be a ticket outlet for our monthly shows.

She has done this with grace, humor and absolutely no remuneration except our thanks and gratitude. She and her warm, wonderful word store, one and the same, will be sorely missed.

Again, our best wishes to Pat and Buzz for the future and our thanks for the past.

For all the members, fans and board of the Pistol River Concert Association,

Harry Freiberg

Brookings


A chance to help those who help

Editor:

A chance to help those who help. That is what you have a chance to do on Friday, April 29, from 6 to 8:30 p.m.:

Our community gathering place (Chetco Activity Center) is having a Spring Fling Fundraiser so that we can continue to provide a place for all to gather for meals, games, time out, free tax prep, Meals on Wheels, and socialization.

We all need one another – we all need the Chetco Activity Center (CAC). There will be a full Prime Rib dinner with a silent and live auction – all with an ocean view Tickets are $35 per person or $60 per couple.

Please plan to attend this activity and hep those who help others at CAC, located behind Subway. For more information or to make a reservation, call 541-469-6822. Thank you and I hope to see you there.

Don “Mr. 105 Endurance”  Vilelle

Brookings


Insurance companies get away with it

Editor:

Mr. Allwardt, (Pilot, April 9) insurance companies have in practice policies that restrict or deny health care to millions of Americans.

One of them is called rescission, where the insurance companies go through their client lists and use cheap excuses to drop anyone from those lists who are likely to cost the insurance company more money than they want to pay. If the people who are dropped are lucky enough to qualify for a government program, then what you have is a situation where an insurance company raked in tons of cash off their client, only to dump that client off onto the federal and state governments when it came time to start paying back.

That’s just one of the ways insurance companies get away with bilking their customers; and one of the reasons the federal government already pays for 60 percent of all health care costs in this country. In fact, were it not for the abject misbehavior of the health insurance industry and other bad players, we wouldn’t be having this protracted national debate over health care. They are the ones who broke the system, and it is folly to think that, left to their own devices, they would be the ones to fix it.

Eldon Rollins

Coquille


My solutions to our nation’s problems

Editor:

On Tuesday, April 12, Rep. Peter DeFazio held a one-hour telephone conference with the voters of Oregon.

He fielded various suggestions, responded to various questions and, in general, he provided the folks with a brief diversionary waste of time.

Of course, one hour is not enough time to respond to everyone who had a statement to make, so I was, unfortunately, among the many who didn’t get a chance to give my take on the nation and the world. I say “unfortunately” because my solution to our nation’s problems is brief and simple. It goes like this:

•Obey our first president’s advice to “avoid all foreign entanglements.” That means, for one thing, bring the troops home. All the thousands of American servicemen and equipment who are presently intruding in more than 150 different nations around the world – bring ‘em home! (We could line some of them up along our own borders.)

•Cut way back on all foreign aid – including to Israel.

•Check out all the merchandise stocking the shelves of our stores. Everything that proclaims “made in China,” start manufacturing them in America (remember “made in U.S.A.?”) There should be plenty of surplus troops to man the factories.

There are a few other things we could do, once we get the hang of it, but that’s enough for starters.

How about it? Let’s give sanity a chance!

Yeah, I know; such a Utopian plan can never happen in the erstwhile free world, where tyranny rules supreme over all and class stupidity moves the masses. So – hey, forget it

Chuck Grove

Harbor


Democrats remind me of a turtle

Editor:

One of the GOP planks in the last election was jobs.

As of April 15, over 100 days have passed since House Speaker Boehner took over the gavel. The Republicans have presented many bills (religious bills, bills to cut funding and jobs for many Americans still working) but not one single job creation bill.

This is all just busy work to keep Democrats reacting instead of leading. They combine to be a very effective smokescreen covering up the fact that the Republicans don’t really have a job creation plan.

The Democrats remind me of a turtle. They appear to be hard-shelled but a little tap on their back and they stop moving and retreat back into their shells. The Republicans have taken on the characteristics of the ostrich. They give a vicious kick in the back to the working class but when it comes to jobs, the economy, the growth of the nation, and the development of an educational system that can actually teach our children skills needed to remain competitive in the world, they stick their collective heads in the sand.

With the tea party running the grand opposition party, your daughters aren’t safe and neither are seniors, the middle class, the environment, nor democracy but big oil, coal, health insurance companies, Wall Street and the rich sure will be as America continues to lose its place in the future.

I prefer a nation where human beings, health, families, communities, children, adults, and peace on earth flourish. If this is truly a religious nation, I hope people to see – it’s not about getting your own piece of the pie and letting others fight for any crumbs – it’s that we’re all in this together. See more at http://bit.ly/bRmieu

Gordon Clay

TheCitizensWhoCare.org

Brookings


A well-behaved girl who needs a home

Editor:

I had the opportunity to take “Prissy” (a very special black lab) home with us for four days when  SCHS (South Coast Humane Society) was closed.

She is a very loving girl who wants to please. She loves attention and being loved. She gets along very well with other dogs (we have two black labs, “Lily” and “Ashley”) and at times there are five in our house. She sleeps at the foot of the bed with our dogs and has never been a problem. She is housebroken. She doesn’t let us know when she wants out, but we let them out regularly as part of our routine. She only barks when someone comes to the door. She is good on a leash and has good manners. She will sit and stay when told. She takes things very gently with her mouth. I sense no aggression in her at all.

After the first day I let her off leash at the beach and she had a wonderful time running and playing. From then on when I would go out she would too and always stayed close. She doesn’t come when called, but stays with me and the other dogs. She doesn’t eat much and I feel she’s tired of Science Diet food. She has had some hard times in her past but I’m sure she would make a very loving faithful companion for the right family.

I hope, when she is adopted, to be able to stay in touch with her family so I can dog sit whenever there might be a need. I hope she will be able to come over and visit and perhaps have some sleepovers so our dogs can continue a relationship with her.

I would not hesitate adopting her myself if we didn’t already have two. When there is a life-making decision looming on the horizon, we adopt a third dog so that the surviving dog will have a mate. Fortunately my girls are healthy and happy, so we don’t need that third dog yet, but if that need were there, “Prissy” would be ours in a heartbeat.

Steve Knudson,

SCHS volunteer

Brookings


Mourning the loss of our beloved dog

Editor:

On Sunday April 10, Luna passed away with systemic organ failure, following a malicious poisoning a few days prior.

Someone who would do this kind of act is a cruel, malicious and evil scourge. It is beyond all reason that someone would attack an innocent and beautiful being this way, and to also harm us by killing our best friend and companion. Those of you reading this who knew Luna, will remember her joyfulness and loving heart. She was loved by all.  Luna came to us as a rescue dog in 2003, and instantly became part of our family. She loved life, and being a part of everything we did. She was so thankful to be here as we were to have her beautiful spirit brightening every day with joyfulness and her abiding love. There are no words to express the grief we feel for her loss.  Every once in a while a rare being becomes part of one’s life, whether a human or animal companion; one that brings goodness and light, and is a great gift.  And so we are left with the memories of Luna, and everywhere she walked and played, slept and shared our lives.  The  places in the garden where we would be together cultivating and working the soil and caring for the plants.  She loved the beaches, rivers, hiking, people and most of all the life we shared together. On a difficult day she was always there, steady, constant and loving, reminding us of joy and being present. That is indeed a spiritual gift.  I often called her  the “angel in a dog suit,” for  she was a great being of a higher consciousness. Our family will miss her greatly and never forget her. Our hearts are broken.  Namaste Luna, thank you for gracing our lives with so much love. We will always remember you.

Shelley Sovola and Family