Letters to the Editor published Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011

February 26, 2011 05:00 am

GOP has become morally bankrupt

Editor,

It has become clearly evident that the Republican Party has become morally bankrupt.

They are against taxing the very rich, the corporations and the oil companies that are making record high profits, yet have no compunction about not solving the national debt, which they created, and which weighs heaviest on the backs of seniors, schools and the middle class in general. Their willingness to shut down the government, thus stopping social security checks and medicare payments, is unconscionable.

The Republican Party is obviously a party of the corporations and very rich, and not a party of the people, and it is mind boggling to think that any thinking individual could condone such action by voting for them. 

John Bischoff

Brookings


Who’s going to pay for new clinic?

Editor:

We now have a new, $13.5-million, urgent-care clinic that has replaced the old, leased one on Fifth Street.

It will require a lot of patients for Curry Health District (CHD) to pay just the 8 percent interest on the $13.5 million – about $1.1 million a year. (Yes, really. Do the math if you’re skeptical.)

 Then, of course, there are the salaries for doctors, nurses, technicians, multiple staffers and building maintenance for 34,000 square feet of space, with 21 exam rooms to keep spotless. And all this just for little old Brookings-Harbor!

Port Orford and Gold Beach were annexed into CHD in 1983 by a vote of the residents, and their property taxes were raised  many years ago. Port Orford has been provided with a small clinic with one doctor. Residents there go to Bandon or Coos Bay for treatment. Why would they come here? Gold Beach already has its small hospital (run by CHD) with a 24-7 ER. Why would their residents come here to a clinic?

If Brookings-Harbor is annexed into the Curry Health District, you can bet your booties our property taxes will increase. Who knows how much? (A district has a lot of leeway.) Their grandiose plans for expansion of this clinic will have to be supported by:

•our extra tax dollars;

•our paid fees for medical services, which will be higher than at present;

•I wish we knew.

 We have about 14,000 residents in these two small communities. Are we all going to get sick enough to pay for this clinic? And if we can’t get sick enough to support it, who pays?

 Actually, I don’t feel very well, just thinking about it.

Mim Lagoe

Harbor


Watch out for GOP economics

Editor:

Oregonians have to watch out for Republican economics. Just the other day, on the editorial page (Pilot, Feb. 12) a citizen complained that Democrats are giving away money to big business. He was wrong; it was a loan to keep Americans in jobs and their houses. Two pages later, there was an article about how Curry County is giving away $35,000 to a private business to create a business plan. That $35,000 dollars will not be repaid. That money could have gone to police, schools or the hospital. That is a real example of picking winners and losers.

Another example is in Wisconsin. The new governor inherited only a $20-million deficit and then passed a $117-million-dollar tax cut for this year, and a $3.5-billion deficit for the next two years.

When giving tax cuts of that size, Republicans need to tell the truth about where the massive deficit comes from. It’s not from the state workers, but from the Republican governor and legislature. If they are going to do these kinds of massive tax cuts, they need to campaign on it, not spring it on the tax payer who will now have to make up that massive reduction in revenue for the state.

My dollar can’t stand anymore Republican economics.

Dominic Hammon

Brookings


Brookings quilters a winning group

Editor:

I thought I died and went to heaven when I learned I’d won the much coveted gift basket assembled and raffled off by the Azalea Quilters Guild. Enjoying the contents was like having a shopping spree at Nieman Marcus – full of high quality local merchandise and services. Our Brookings Harbor quilters know how to delight a winner! I don’t care if lightening never strikes twice in one spot – when the guild offers a similar raffle, I will be the first to buy a lot of tickets, as should all of you!

Vikki Nuss

Brookings


A canine plea for fresh air, exercise

Editor:

 From all the dogs in the shelter.

Hello, we are here because we already had a bad life. All of us were abused one way or another. Lately, a horrible thing happed to us. Our privilege of seeing some sun, smelling the wind, getting some exercises and going to the bathroom outside was taken a way from us.

That is so unfair and we are so sad.

City of Brookings, please let us be outdoors in our back yard between the hours of 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. so we can stretch our legs. We promise we will not make any more noise than our neighbors Chevron, the plywood mill, and all the shops in this industrial-zoned area.

Agatha Conrad

Brookings


Coast Guard will dispose of U.S. flags

Editor:

After reading “A proper retirement for the U.S. flag” (Pilot, Feb. 16) I would like to add this bit of information. My husband was retired military and we fly two flags at our home during the summer. When the flags are replaced, I take the old ones to the U.S. Coast Guard in Harbor, and they dispose of them properly. You can take a flag there anytime. Thank you.

Cecilia Johnson

Gold Beach


Be more aware of how signals work

Editor:

Opened the paper today (Pilot, Feb. 23) and was saddened by the story of the woman who was hit by the car in our town.

The reason I am writing this is, it could have been me. I had an incident happen to me about 1:30 p.m. the same day.

I was going to the video store from the tire store. I decided to take the crosswalk towards Chase Bank. I waited for the light to turn and the little white man to turn on so I could walk across the street. I stepped off the curb and a car that was turning right from Fifth Street had to stop sharp. Then, I was almost in the middle of the intersection when a big black truck was making a left turn from Fifth Street to go south onto Highway 101. He was going pretty fast and saw me. I thought, how come the light was green on the west side of the street? I had the right-of-way.

Maybe we all need to be more aware of how the signals work, both drivers and pedestrians. I could have been another one sitting in a hospital bed, or worse.

Mary Jo Bohnenkamp

Brookings


A tobacco-free campus in Curry

Editor:

On March 1, Curry Health Network will join the majority of Oregon hospitals in having tobacco-free campuses.

For more than 40 years, we’ve known the devastating health effects of smoking and tobacco use. State records indicate that tobacco use is a contributing factor in 22.2 percent of deaths, and 2009 figures show that for Curry County, the medical costs directly associated with tobacco use was $11.8 million dollars. Costs associated with loss of productivity due to illness and premature death added another $10.7 million dollars.

We have been a smoke-free facility for years. With the new policy, the ban on tobacco products covers all Curry Health Network properties, and applies to employees, physicians, patients and visitors.

To prepare for a tobacco- free campus, we’ve made smoking-cessation treatments available to our employees for the past year. We will also provide care packets for visitors to help them cope with their need to smoke while visiting our facilities.

For patients who use tobacco, we will provide support and treatment while in the hospital to help with the nicotine withdrawal, but as of March 1, smoking is no longer an option for inpatients at Curry General Hospital.

Our approach is nonpunitive; we don’t want to be the smoking police. However, as health professionals who care for tobacco users throughout the county, we know firsthand the disease, illness and death associated with tobacco use. It’s time for us to step up.

Bill McMillan

Chief Executive Officer

Curry Health Network


Use road funds for roads, not deputies

Editor:

The Pilot’s recent report of a funding strategy using county road funds to pay deputies in Curry County (Pilot, Feb. 23) brings to mind that familiar metaphor regarding the camel’s nose.

Don’t be surprised if the camel’s face that emerges from under the tent flap has a strong resemblance to that of our two myopic county supervisors, Waddle and Rhodes.

The Curry County road fund is derived from federal forest receipts and represents a separate account in the treasury dedicated to roads or road improvements. The director of the Curry County Road Department has been a prudent and responsible manager of the fiscal resources assigned to his jurisdiction in supporting a systematic road maintenance plan, as well as effectively and efficiently addressing the frequent exigencies that occur within our coastal highway system.

Political exploitation of the authorizing statute (ORS 368.710) by two other Oregon counties does not represent justification for similar action by our elected officials. Such manipulation not only subverts the purpose for which the statute was established, it also places limitations on our county’s capacity to maintain its streets and highways.

Archie McVay

Brookings


Nice to read good news in the Pilot

Editor:

It appears there has been a recent increase in the positive aspect of the news being reported in our local paper. I just want to say thank you for that. It is nice to read more uplifting articles rather than the doom and gloom that surrounds us on a daily basis. Please keep up the good work! Thanks, from a local Pilot reader.

Sylvia Mahon

Brookings