Letters to the Editor published Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2010
November 10, 2010 05:00 am

Writer’s powers of deduction amaze

Editor:

I would like to compliment Ms. O’Dell on her letter (Pilot, Nov. 6).

I am certainly glad she is a member of our community. Her ability to deduce the culprit of a crime from just the occurrence of same is breathtaking. I have not seen such perspicacity since the last episode of Scooby Doo. Hats off to such a Holmesian performance. I would also like to note that I totally agree that most communities have caring and generous people.

Quite often they are called Republicans and Independents.

Ken Swanson

Harbor


Pitch in and help keep county alive

Editor:

This great nation is in serious trouble. The state of Oregon is in serious trouble. Curry County is in serious trouble. Everyone is having to tighten their budgets and let go of a lot of amenities and services.

Curry County will be one of the first counties to fail financially. A lot of public services will be lost, cutbacks will be severe, and the State will have to step in.

Even when it comes to the point of eliminating the three commissioners’ positions due to lack of funds, we can be assured that at least the planning commissioners’ board will stay intact, because it’s a volunteer board, representing the entire county.

Our recovery as a nation will continue to be slow, no matter who runs the government. But I feel we can survive by using the planning commission board volunteers as an emergency entity. It will at least keep the county services alive. The county budget cannot afford three commissioners salaries, nor the staff to support those positions.

Our main concern should continue to be law enforcement and emergency personnel, along with each department’s pay and benefits being cut back to a sustainable rate to support the county’s infrastructure expense. I would also hope that all the past and present commissioners would be able to assist the now seated planning commission board in the transition and reorganization of business, along with the general population of Curry County. We all need to pitch in and help wherever we can. Volunteers are needed.

Gary Davis

Harbor


Using fear tactics to affect the gullible

 Editor:

People tend to believe what they want to believe, and fear is a major factor in convincing gullible people to believe in any subject to be sold.

The pharmaceutical industry has been very successful in this regard. Spread something that is not true over and over, and many people never question how true it may be or the motivation of the source.

For those readers who are convinced that government spending and the deficit must be reduced, and are concerned about the socialistic tendency in our government, this letter is for you.

It seems that the politicians who are so good about spreading fear to us common folks who just don’t know any better, never offer any recommendations on how to accomplish these worthy goals.

The following recommendations are offered for consideration. The first effort should be to end the winless wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In addition, bring the overseas troops home from Germany, South Korea, etc. This would save billions of dollars and save lives.

Those readers who are concerned about the socialization movement in our government can start by refusing their Medicare and Social Security. This would save billions of dollars.

Congress must pass the taxation for those making more than $250,000. If they don’t, the deficit will increase by $700 billion. Until our government leaders balance our budget, they should consider a 10 to 20 percent cut in pay and offer to pay for their own medical insurance rather than accept the government coverage.

Walt Edwards

Gold Beach


What is so terrible about getting high?

Editor:

You folks who voted “No” on 74 won!

Now those very sick people with cancer, losing weight, in severe pain and throwing up from chemotherapy nausea will continue to be unable to get their doctor-prescribed medical marijuana to ease those “minor” problems and get high!

Those folks with multiple sclerosis, persistent, painful muscle spasms, AIDS, and seizures, and agitated people with Alzheimers must continue to suffer because you decided they should get no relief and certainly must not be permitted to get “high.”

Just what is so terrible about getting “high?”

Is getting the “munchies,” feeling good, happy and relaxed worse than getting drunk, aggressive and destructive?

Alcohol, the acceptable American drug, not only can make you more aggressive, destructive, addicted and overly confident, it can also cause liver and brain damage, and it can even kill you.

Marijuana does none of those things. Not only does it have many valid medical uses, it makes you less aggressive, more cautious and even friendlier.

And all that’s bad?

So very sick people must continue to suffer because they just might feel good and that’s “bad.”

Sorry, but I think that attitude is sick!

You have to be very sick to even qualify for medical marijuana in Oregon; California is more progressive.

I think cannabis should be legal for any responsible adult to use in private as long as that use does not harm or endanger anyone else or their property.

Sheila Chambers

Brookings

 

Those ‘Okies are smokin!’

Editor:

As I “toddle-off” to visit “mater” in England, I go, having seen a “jolly good” performance of “Oklahoma!” by B.H.C.T. (Brookings-Harbor Community Theater).

It’s on for another two weekends, and if you want your feet a-tapping, your face a-smiling and a general “tune-up” of the funny bone, then go along and witness a high-energy, downright good production from some of our local talent.

Who’d-a-thunk that dapper roadside traveller, Ira Tozer, (who waves at all the cars), could play with such aplomb a “passionate, Persian peddler.” Ira, you devil you! You see what happens when you support your community theaters! They uncover all sorts of hidden depths! Keep supporting — that’s what I say!

Megan Walters can act and sing, what a voice! Mike Vest is always a fine actor, but hats off to him, a non-singer, for what is a very difficult score, and doing a fine job. Bubbly Sarah McDonald, dancing Don Carr, and many others gave their all and sent us home happy.

Highly recommended.

No more letters from me — read this paper and all the other posters, info., etc, that abounds and get out there and support your local community. (And go check out Ira! Phew!)

Jan Marney

Brookings


Tea party’s demise a matter of time

Editor:

My, my, the tea people sure did make fools of themselves, didn’t they?

Lying about our country, dirty tricks, wearing chicken costumes to town hall meetings, supporting racist candidates that think business owners should have the “right” to exclude anyone from their motel, restaurant, or business because of their race, or religion. For goodness sake, who are these people? Wait until the silent majority find out what they’re up to.

You’d never know it if you live in Curry County, but 40 percent of America is not white, while the tea party/Republicans are 96 percent white.

There is no future for any party that excludes 40 percent of the population. It’s just a matter of time and demographics.

Let’s not forget, the Democrats left us a balanced budget and a surplus. It was Republicans that failed to protect us, doubled — soon to be tripled — our national debt and left us a $1 trillion dollar a year deficit.

In February or March, we’re going to have to borrow another $1 trillion to pay for Republican follies like: unfunded Medicare Part “D,” two unfunded wars and the unfunded Bush tax cuts.

Somehow, millions of Americans have convinced themselves it’s okay to blame Obama and the Democrats for these Republican failures! Thank God we Oregonians won’t be a part of the shame the Republican/Tea Party is bringing to our country.

Keep the faith middle America; once we outlive the failed Republicans and their selfish philosophies, we can make the “Great Leap Forward” America deserves.

Larry Schelter,  Veterans, Keeping Oregon Blue

Gold Beach


A enlightened path to nuclear power

Editor:

Thomas Edison is famous for his invention of the light bulb and numerous other inventions.

 Less known is his promise to the American people to invent a weapon of mass destruction for the defense of the nation. Did he fulfill his promise? Well, consider the following before forming your conclusion.

The atomic bomb materially came out of the Manhattan Project. It was the largest joint collaboration in our nation’s history, up until then, between the government and private industry. The precursor of the Manhattan project was the T.V.A  (Tennessee Valley Authority).

The T.V.A paved the way fort the Manhattan Project in several respects. The T.V.A. provided massive amounts of electricity required by the Manhattan Project. The T.V.A. provided the model for a massive joint effort between private companies and the government. The T.V.A. really was the launching pad for the Manhattan Project. 

It was the work of Thomas Edison and his collaborators that paved the way for the Tennessee Valley Authority. The main idea behind the T.V.A. was regional electrification. That was an extension of the localized electrification developed by Thomas Edison and his collaborators.

If you trace back far enough the road that led to the Manhattan Project, you will inevitably encounter the peaceful Thomas Edison. I, for one, think he kept his promise — sort of.

Tom Anderson

Brookings


Be careful what you wish for

Editor:

Two thoughts on the recent election. A victory margin of 9 percent, such as Congressman DeFazio had over challenger Robinson, is considerably more than withstanding a challenge.

Most people who run for office dream of 9 percent victory margins. The most succinct summation of the election was given by Sheriff John Bishop: “Several bills in the federal system may help us, but with Republicans taking over the House, I think the ticket will be turned off.” (Pilot, Nov. 3).

In other words, be careful for what you wish and for whom you vote. You will not have any excuses or scapegoats if you win.

Harry Freiberg

Brookings


Boice was an outstanding man

Editor:

I read with sadness the news of the death of one of Curry County’s outstanding citizens — Sheriff Allen Boice.

I had the privilege to meet the sheriff when I was 10 years old. A private plane had crashed somewhere near our family’s ranch by Carpenterville on a stormy Friday night in March, and Sheriff Boice was perhaps the third law enforcement officer to arrive on the scene. I stayed up late to witness the rain-drenched searchers file in and out of our living room during the night-long search, and Sheriff Boice was out with them the whole time. 

The next morning, with over 100 volunteers searching high and low, I heard the voice of Randy Rettke calling that he’d found something.   My dog and I were second at the scene, and I stayed on guard until the sheriff arrived and took control. The pilot had died in the crash and I was pretty shaken up by the sight. 

Days later, I got a personal note in the mail from Sheriff Boice commending me for being a part of the search.  I’ve always held Allen Boice in high esteem for the way he did his job as sheriff and the way he treated a kid who had just seen his first (and only) corpse.

Ted Fitzgerald

Brookings


Woman in photo is Eileen Rogers

Editor:

This morning’s Pilot (Nov. 3) printed a photo/story regarding a volunteer donating her time at Fred Meyer market for the Salvation Army’s donation kettle.

The lovely lady in the article is my neighbor. Her name is Mrs. Eileen Rogers. Why wasn’t her name obtained prior to the printing of this issue of the Pilot?

This is only one of many times when names are not obtained prior to Pilot printings.

Again, it is time for another “regretful” correction.

Pilot people: Please do better in future articles.

Katie Godino

Brookings


Compromise is not the solution

Editor:

Forget compromise. The message of Obama, Pelosi and Reid has been “Shut up and sit down. We know what’s best for you fuzzy-thinking rubes.”

Sadly, many RINOs (Republicans in Name Only)  have given us the same message. With this election it was our turn to deliver a message: You’re fired, you failed, you greedy, authoritarian, elitist snobs. You got us in this mess. We have a far-left ruling class presiding over a center-right country, and the results have been an utter disaster, politically, culturally and financially. It’s a catastrophe, and we’re living it.

Compromise is not the solution. We’ve been pummeled, beaten up by liberalism for far too long. It’s time to strike back, and Nov. 2 was the first blow. During the 2006 midterm elections, did anyone on the Democratic side ever suggest, “You know, we’re going to need to compromise because we have George W. Bush in the White House for two more years.”

Did you hear Pelosi or Reid or Hoyer talk about compromising with Bush, or working with the Republicans? Did the media suggest it? Of course not. So why in the world are our inside-the-beltway ruling elites suddenly obsessed with the notion that we must compromise? At the same time, the media is advising: you can’t fulfill the obligations of those wacko tea-party voters and govern constructively. CBS News reports that the national debt is up $3 trillion on Obama’s watch. How do you compromise with that? Do you meet Obama and the Democrats halfway, at $1.5 trillion? Where is constructive governance in the national debt going up by $3 trillion?

Where is there any compromise with Marxism or socialism or liberalism? Where is the compromise with evil? In the context of right and wrong, how do you compromise with wrong?

Clay Dalrymple

Gold Beach