Letters to the Editor published Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010

January 30, 2010 05:00 am

Trapping pets is horrible, illegal

Editor:

Maddie's story (the kitty rescued after missing for 82 days) is alarmingly similar to Paco’s story who was trapped and dumped up the Chetco north bank in January 2008.

Paco’s trapper confessed to me and I did not prosecute. Later, as I learned more about this man, I tried to prosecute but the 6-month statute of limitations was up. My complaint is, however, on file with the authorities and he is being watched by neighbors.

Trapping and dumping a domestic animal is not only horrible and a probable death sentence for the pet, devastating and heartbreaking to their humans who are searching; it is ILLEGAL!   Leaving a domestic animal at a location without providing for continued care is “Animal Abandonment,” a Class C Misdemeanor and carries up to a $5000 fine and one year imprisonment. If “cruelty” is involved, it can become a felony.

Cat trapping and dumping or abandonment by owner is going on in our community more than most are aware of.  Most “lost” cats did not become so by choice. They’ve been moved by humans or killed by cars or predators. We can affect the human aspect by being watchful and reporting to Animal Control at 1-800-242-5118. Investigate live traps; a sign is supposed to be posted stating they are trapping wild animals. It is difficult to catch these moral and legal criminals but if they know we are watching and reporting, we can make them afraid. I know a cat on a walkabout can be a nuisance but we can educate to use better, humane deterrents. A few good sprays with a garden hose can surely encourage them to go home. An effort can also be made to find and talk to the owner as they, too, must be more responsible.

There is  a link off  http://www.helpusfindmaddie.com to start a movement.    Or you can go directly to http://www.helpusfindourcat.com.  It  will be a central  place to reunite pets and people, provide information on missing pets and how they became so, share stories and tips. Both Maddie’s and Paco’s friends can contribute and I hope they have a lot of friends.

Please help our furry friends. They need us.

Sharon Oppenheimer

Harbor


Dubby always in my heart

Editor:

I lost a special friend, her name was Dublin. My very dear neighbor’s dog that belonged to Mr. Dan Rotterman. 

She was so special to me over the last six years that I knew her. As soon as she would come home from school she would come over and sit on my front porch. She loved to play in my back yard and roll in my grass. She was loving and so special to me. She would just come into my house and join my two little Shih Tzus like a member of our family. She was like a member of our family. 

I just want to say that I will miss you, Dubby, as I already do. Not to see you running to my house and playing in my driveway with your wonderful master, Dan. You will be missed and I know without a doubt that you are in doggy heaven. 

I love you, Dubby, and you will always be in my heart.

Robin, Maggie and Bear Blue

Brookings


Raising taxes in a recession

Editor:

On July 20, 2009, our governor signed two tax bills that would increase taxes in Oregon by $733 million through increasing the states corporation tax and raising taxes on individuals and businesses. 

In answer to this move Oregon citizens and business groups turned in enough signatures to qualify those measures for a vote of all Oregonians not just the select in Salem. These increases in individual tax and the tax on businesses including family owned farms will be in place until 2013.

And no, Ms. Eels, the legislature did not directly fund those ads we (we) seeing on TV sponsored by Defend Oregon. Let’s hope we can get some “honesty” out of our Legislature that is on the path to bury our State with taxes during one of our worst recessions.Did not our President decry raising taxes in a recession?

Sue Morro

Brookings


Taxes passed to the customers

Editor:

It appears that the Socialist Progressive League of Women Voters has finally come out of the closet.

This organization that has claimed to be non-partisan for many years is finally showing its true Obama community organizing colors.  They must be taking lessons from AARP and ACORN. 

Mr. Gordon Clay in his forum piece in the Jan. 20, 2010, Pilot seems to be surprised that politicians like Republicans Wayne Krieger and Jeff Kruse would stretch the truth on Measures 66 and 67.

One had only to attend the town hall meeting of Democratic Rep. Peter DeFazio a couple of months ago regarding his promoting Obama’s health plan to hear him sell out the people of Oregon with lies. They are politicians, therefore they lie. It always amazes me the way the Socialist Progressives like the League of Women Voters suck the people into voting for taxes to supposedly tax the rich corporations.

Taxes are not paid by corporations or businesses; they are always paid by the lowest common denominator, the customer or consumer of their goods or services. 

We pay all taxes, folks, so when you vote to tax businesses or corporations, you are just reaching in your own pocket to pay them. Have you ever noticed when government finances get tough, they always threaten to lay off cops and teachers and never morons like the ODOT group that gave us the Constitution Way debacle or the Harbor Weigh Station debacle or Governor Kolonoscopy who gave us the multi-million dollar Oregon/California border Welcome Center that looks more like a satellite of Pelican Bay Prison. 

Vote all incumbents, Republican and Democrat, out of office. Show them we are not going to take it anymore.

Ralph Martin

Harbor

 

Why vote ‘No’ to playground

Editor:

How can the Port Commissioners vote “No” against a partially funded playground at the Port?

I had to read your article “Port rejects playground, donor seeks alternative site” twice to make sure I was reading this correctly. The commissioners’ excuse is safety, liability and maintenance concerns.

How about those floating docks at the Port of Brookings? There is safety, liability, and maintenance concerns with these items as well, correct? The commissioners would never close the docks for anglers to access their boats, so why vote “No” to a playground?

If those commissioners are looking for excuses, then use something different, such as environmental impact, or be just honest and say commissioners do not want children at their Port.

Refresh my memory: Is the Port of Brookings Harbor a public facility or is it not?

Alex Witter

Portland


Be ready to help yourself, others

Editor:

In reference to the editorial (Pilot, Jan. 23), the Haiti earthquake brings back the reality that we are so close to being victims ourselves – maybe not to that extent of damage, because of our building codes, medical services and low density population.

That being said, one life is too many when that life is your loved one.

I attended a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) class several years ago. The information was on disaster preparedness, tsunami, earthquake, forest fire and so on. The instructors were trained volunteers and very thorough. The training was sponsored by FEMA – the classes were free.

I am concerned that we are not continuing the training for all interested coastal residents. This should be an ongoing commitment for our sake, our children and our grandchildren. If first responders (police, fire, ambulance service) cannot get to your emergency immediately, then you are the immediate responder to save yourselves, your neighbors, your pets, and your community.

Harlan Martin

Brookings


Beware census mail scam

Editor:

I received in the mail, what was claimed to be, a national census of senior citizens asking seniors to fill out and return with $14.58 and a stamp.

The letter had Representative Peter De Fazio’s name on it. I was suspicious of it and called Representative De Fazio’s office. They asked me to call the Better Business Bureau of Eugene. They said it was probably a sham for the money only.

Phyllis Cottingham

Brookings


Why no dogs at Easy Manor?

Editor:

Hi, my name is Meika and I was one of the first to enjoy the original Easy Manor Park.

I came with my leash, license and a plastic bag. I came to run and play with my friends.

When the beautiful new park was finished, all of a sudden, I no longer was welcome to my favorite park. I pay my taxes, I’m a good citizen and I clean up after myself.

I would like to have them take down the sign that says “no dogs allowed.”  Woof, woof.

Meika and Maya Primich

Brookings


We apologize for late delivery

Editor:

My sons are carriers for the Pilot.

This last Wednesday, we delivered the paper one half hour short of our normal time, and we are sincerely apologetic for this. Blame it on the mom. Of course the alarm clock did not trip due to too many curling irons and blow-dryers running off the circuits – oops a daisy! Even though the required delivery time is 7:30 (a.m.), our boys like to have your paper delivered at least by 6:30 a.m.

But now that we have your attention, we want to thank the many wonderful customers we have grown to adore.I don't know but, this brings the thought of the Rockefeller age, where kids play in sprinklers in the front yard and ride their bikes with baseball cards in the spokes.

It may seem minuscule, having the boys take a little pride in a silly paper route, but, as a parent, I see they have developed and hope to continue to develop into responsible and considerate adults through college and life.

Your father and I are very proud of you boys, and none, to say the least, so lucky. Thank you. We are your parents first, and someone you can always talk to and approach with a disciplined and open mind next to this fact.

Well, all I wanted to say is there are so many beautiful people in this town and I/we just wanted to let them know! Thank you.

Mrs. Eve Whalen,

“mom helper”

paper route 13

Brookings


Hold paper to higher standard

Editor:

Mr. Sullivan began stating Huxley criticized “erroneous opinions” of the Pilot and closed with Huxley is “factually correct of course ...” but “could cut the Pilot some slack!”

First, neither the letters to the editor title “No facts to support editorial” (written by Pilot staff) or the actual letter made reference to “erroneous” opinions. Mr. Sullivan, my opinion is that newspaper editors and publishers should be held to a higher standard than the average citizen with respect to their writing of general news articles and most certainly to editorials. All too often, in my opinion, this is not the case. According to the Curry Coastal Pilot editor, “The publisher edits and gives final approval on all editorials.”

In theory, the Society of Professional Journalists’ “Code of Ethics” opening statement best sums up the high standard good journalists should set and meet on a continuous basis on all subjects they report on or provide opinions about. http://www.spj.org/pdf/ethicscode.pdf

“Members of the Society of Professional Journalists believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. The duty of the journalist is to further those ends by seeking truth and providing a fair and comprehensive account of events and issues.”

Regardless of whether or not an editor or publisher is a journalist, their position title should require they be held to the high standards above and that includes, when appropriate, providing and checking sources supporting their opinions and news articles.

Thomas C. Huxley

Brookings


Buying the bullies’ spiel

Editor:

For years school bullies have frightened children into giving them their lunch money and now other bullies have used a slightly different gambit to enable them to squeeze more money from us.  

The bullies have convinced the students (us) that if they will tell the bullies (Salem legislators) who the richer students are then the bullies will take more from them. Yesterday the majority of Oregon voters bought this specious argument. How does taking more from the wealthy benefit anyone except the bullies? Does increasing the pain of someone else somehow ease your own?

The conservative message of election results in Massachusetts, New Jersey and elsewhere has not been noticed in Salem.

The “Tea Party Patriots” have much more work to do here in Oregon.

Martin J. Sullivan

Brookings


Takes all of us to aid homeless

Editor:

In Scott Graves’ article on homelessness, I was quoted as saying that homeless programs should not be Christian-based, and I would like to clarify that comment.

Religion-based programs don’t resolve a crisis, taking it to fruition. They address one small aspect, like having a bed to sleep in for one night. Spirituality is the overview concept, and addresses how to end the crisis itself, including one person’s plight of having a bed for one night.

Religion is a cultural interpretation of Universal Law, one segment of the whole body of knowledge necessary to end an issue. Jesus taught through the Beatitudes the principles of the plan, but not how to carry it through to fruition. Bringing in the necessary people is part of Judaism. Buddha taught how to get the support you need, and Muhammad taught conflict resolution through the principles of the jihad. He didn’t teach terrorism!

All the major religions together make up the body of knowledge on how to create the life you want. You can resolve any issue if you understand the root cause of the problem, and apply the planning process. The root cause of homelessness is that homeless people believe they don’t have a home. Hillary Clinton said it takes a village to raise a child. Well, it takes the entire town to end homelessness, and the entire world working together to bring world peace.

For world peace to come, every person on the planet must be able to create the life he or she wants without interference, be treated fairly and equally, and have a voice in their government.

Karen Holmes

Brookings