Letters to the Editor published Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2009
November 04, 2009 05:00 am

Veterans remembered

Editor:

In 1926 the Elks National Veterans Memorial was dedicated on Chicago’s lakefront for World War I Veterans.

Rededications for World War II and in 1976 for Korean and Vietnam Veterans.

In 1994 for the men and women who have served in all our nation’s conflict.

Since 1917 the Elks has demonstrated its compassion for the veterans of our armed forces through a number of programs and activities.

•World War I: In l917 the Grand Lodge allocated $2 million to assist our soldiers; the Elks equipped the first two base hospitals in France.  To accommodate the maimed and wounded, the Elks built a 700-bed Reconstruction Hospital and gave it to the War Department. This was the first of what was to become the Veterans Administration medical facilities. Following war’s end, the Elks made 40,000 rehabilitation, vocational, and eduction loans to disabled vets. This was so effective the government followed the Elks example and established a revolving fund that was a precursor of the GI Bill;

•World War II: Elks contributed $l.5 million from Grand Lodge and thousands from local lodges to support our troops and families;

•Korea and Vietnam: Gift packages, letters and half a million pints of blood requested by the secretary of defense;

•Desert Storm and beyond: Gift packages, letters and the first organization to formally welcome home our Veterans.

Nov. 11 is Veterans Day. Since l917 the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks  has demonstrated its compassion for veterans of our armed forces. “So long as there are veterans, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks will never forget them.”

Nov. 15, the Coos Bay Elks Past Exalted Rulers will serve a free steak breakfast to the Coos Bay Elk members who are veterans. All other Elks will pay $6.

Leading Knight Sharon Koberstein

Elks Lodge 1160

Coos Bay


Ready to throw freedom away

Editor:

Regarding: “So spiteful and intolerant” by Patricia Graves (Pilot, Oct.28).

I do not agree with the writer. She (said) that Obama is second only to Carter for trying to destroy the U.S. Carter was an idiot. Mr. Obama is intelligent and he is pure evil and yes, he is a master liar and here is the proof “of course”:

•During his run for office Obama made the following pledges to the American people, no lobbyists funding his campaign. Goldman Sacks (TARP) recipient gave over $1 million. Lie no. 1;

•No executive branch electioneering. He has used his office to threaten congressmen, senators, the news media and others that speak out against his agenda. Lie no. 2;

•No political appointees from industry. Raytheon lobbyist William Lynn, Goldman Sacks lobbyist Mark Patterson and Tim Geithner were all nominated to his administration. Lie no. 3;

•Legislative five day “sunlite” pledge. If you have been paying attention you know that was bald-face. Lie no. 4;

•No “signing statements,” that is when the president changes a bill before he signs it. Congress rebuked him 492-2 when he tried. Lie no. 5.

There are many more but space is limited. This information will be found in the Aug. 21 issue of the John Birch Society’s “New American Magazine” so go ahead Ms. Graves, attack the messenger because that is all you can do. That magazine’s motto is, by the way, “That Freedom Shall Not Perish.”

Seems to me that you and others are ready to throw it all away.

Arthur D. Larason

Harbor


I’ll stick with the old system

Editor:

If I remember right, Constitution Way was to be completed by Sept. 2, 2009.

The way it’s looking we’ll be lucky to see it completed by Christmas 2009!

No one responsible, no one cares about costs, no one loses his job or at least gets cut back a pay grade or two, for a mess like this.

One thing about it, the first lowboy with a D-8 Cat or excavator that turns there will take care of the curbing that keeps getting taken out, and then put back in.

I’m sure everyone is watching the Health Care debate and how our government says that it’s going to make things run more efficiently, but if Constitution Way is any indication of where our Health Care is headed, I’ll stick with the old system!

Reg Pettinger

Harbor


Mill noise music in Brookings

Editor:

I have lived here about 20 years longer than the young lady and before I came I knew there was a plywood mill a saw mill, and a sewer plant so I knew what to expect.

They used to blow the whistle for them to go to work but someone complained so off it went.

There was a church that rang music on Sunday mornings and the only ones it bothered were the ones who had hangovers; so off it goes.

In my years here I have seen people move here to get out of the rat race where they lived then they ran for city office to change it like where they came from.

I don’t like to say this but there are two ways to go out,  and if you let us know we will line the roads wishing you a safe trip

Don McAmoi

Brookings

 

Back off all you Obama bashers

Editor:

“Enough of the Obama bashing,” says Doris Burck Pilot, Oct. 21), and she is seconded by Marjorie Schmidt (Pilot, Oct. 31).

That is very sound advice, ladies – a word to the wise. And we had all better take heed.

When communists take over a nation, they historically have a low tolerance for proletarian dissent. The world is well aware of what happened to dissidents in Russia when Lenin took over the government, and in China, when Mao Tse Tung assumed control. Millions of contrary citizens were liquidated for opposing their leaderships. And although that might seem to be an extreme means of silencing the opposition, none can deny that it is effective.

So all of you Obama-bashers out there had just better back off and behave yourselves. You may not live as well as you did before, but at least you might still be living.

God bless America.

C.L. Grove

Harbor


No mill, no work for families

Editor:

South Coast Lumber and Saw Mill is, and has been for many years, music to our ears!

It has employed three generations of our families! If there were no clash or bang, there would be no work for most families in Brookings. We would like to say thank you to the Fallert families for all the years of employment for us, our kids, and even back to our fathers. We would like to say thanks for all their hard work to keep the mills going. Without you and all you have done, there would be no Brookings! That is where the most employment for this town comes from.

So to all the newcomers that have moved to our town, I would hope you could adjust to the clashing and banging. The mills have been here much longer than most people who have moved here in the past many years.

Becky Hodges,

Kathy Bonde

Brookings 


The circus is coming!

Editor:

Do you remember?

Up on the telephone poles above the reach of children, posters appeared. In glorious color they screamed, “The Circus is coming.” In the minds  of children, 100 days passed before an early wake-up call. One, two, three, four, five, maybe 1,000 times, a train whistle roared through the air. My God, the circus was here.

As fast as parental guidance would allow, we rushed to the railroad siding at the edge of town. Giant elephants, roustabouts and young men from town were creating a small city in a huge field near the siding. There were wild animals pacing in their cages, acrobats stretching, prancing horses. There was smoke and steam and and smells from a zillion sources, cotton candy, syrup, candy apples, hot dogs, popcorn, people working and animals living. A weak person might have passed on.

A parade the next morning right down Main Street. A calliope, “did you ever,” animals, clowns. acrobats, music, a man with a whip and one in a top hat; I guess he was the boss.

Sometime Sunday night or early morning on Monday the train was gone. It was the best.

There is only one large circus now; it’s well over 1,000 people strong. It’s the circus in Washington D.C.

It’s different; there are only clowns and jackasses.

Our leaders may walk on water, but they need boots to get through the b.s.

Sheila Chambers, you got it exactly right (Pilot, Oct. 21). 

Clifton Siemens

Brookings 


Brookings is on our minds

Editor:

Dear friends of Brookings: Jerry and I lived in Brookings-Harbor for 35 years and enjoyed all the beautiful areas.

In September we visited for a few days and many of the First Baptist Community Church family met with us at McDonald’s where we had a great time going down memory lane. I enjoy reading the Curry Coastal Pilot newspaper on my laptop and seeing all the wonderful activities that your organizations put on for educational services and entertainment.

We love living in eastern Oregon but will always remember our days in Brookings.

Jerry and Viola Howard

Baker City


Question health district’s plans

Editor:

Well, what is Brookings going to have – thanks to the Curry Health District’s own vote of approval?

A two-story clinic with rooms for eight doctors, 24 exam rooms and a full imaging suite? A clinic with its own emergency room – which requires specialized staffing and a qualified doctor there at all times?

Or a free-standing emergency clinic with all the above requirements, plus rotation staffing of personnel and doctors if it is to be “open 24/7” as stated by Bill McMillan, CEO of Curry Health District? (Curry County Reporter, Oct. 7). And are the rumors of a helipad near the tower of Brookings Police Station true? FAA, are you listening?

All of these ambiguous options have been made public at one time or another, but not in the same newspapers, or with any consistency. All that is consistent is the projected cost – $13.5 million for the citizens in the Curry Health District (CHD) – a 90 percent loan which does not yet include Brookings or Harbor. But oh, my friends, it will!

Annexation of Brookings-Harbor is in their plan, so that we, as well as those north of Pistol River, can be taxed to help pay this atrocious mortgage. Please vote No! Where are all these specially trained people going to come from? And why would they come here when we have two critical access hospitals, north and south, within 30 miles?

We have Cal-Ore, an excellent ambulance service with trained personnel, and flights out from the two hospitals to Medford, San Francisco, or anywhere that extreme medical services might be needed.

Mim Lagoe

Harbor


Local theaters offer fun shows

Editor:

I went to see Zoo Story at the Muse Theatrix last month. 

Howard Patterson and Ron Cole were the only players. Here we have one character who is “on a mission” to intrude, cajole and spill his psycho babble all over the other character who is quintessentially the picture of mild-mannered decorum, trying to read in peace on his favorite park bench. 

BUT there’s more! It’s more sinister and desperate than just an annoying stranger, it’s death by proxy – kinda. Yes, Mr Obnoxious achieves his end and manipulates poor Mr Nice Guy into “doing him in” – Hey, when someone pushes your buttons, who knows how it will end? Personally, I felt like bashing his noggin in with the book after the first five minutes! 

It was a good production and I have to say, it’s not easy making a quieter character hold his own up against a more rambunctious one, but Mr Cole did a superb job.     

As for Dori Blodgett.  After “Don’t Dress For Dinner,” well, we will never look at The Library Lady quite the same way again! Va-va-voom! She let her flaming red locks down and a red-headed vixen strutted her stuff for all to see! Fun show!

Jan Marney

Brookings


Visit Christian Help Thrift store

Editor:

I want to again commend the wonderful threesome:  Kathy, Jamie, and Gene, at the Christian Help Thrift store (in Gold Beach).

If you haven’t visited them yet, you must do so – if you only go in and walk around.

They have just installed new indoor-outdoor carpeting, and it makes the place shine! Speaking of shine … all the merchandise is in excellent condition and everything that’s supposed to work does! The glassware is beautiful and some pieces are collectable. There are lots of cups, coffee pots, silverware, and picture frames. There are tools, lamps, golf clubs, movie tapes and puzzles.

I have found nice toys and books for my great-grandkids. Their book supply is endless in both hardback and paperback, with many well-known authors, and lots of cookbooks. The clothing is in excellent condition, with good choices for women, men nd children.

So go in and say “hello” to them. They always appreciate your receipts from McKay’s and Ray’s Markets. And if you have donations to give take them to Gene at the back door. They are located on Colvin Street behind the courthouse.

Elizabeth A. Peale

Gold Beach