Letters to the Editor published Saturday, July 25, 2009

July 25, 2009 05:00 am

Healthcare a right for all

Editor:

In section 8 of America’s Constitution there are two specific passages that are very important to the current healthcare debate: “to promote the general welfare,” “to promote the progress of science.”

The very definition of the word welfare in the dictionary says: health or well being.

Promoting the progress of science speaks for itself. I am not proud of the reasons that many people will not endorse a national healthcare system, but it seems to me that national healthcare is a Constitutional right given to every American by those early community organizers that were our founding fathers and mothers.

Please visit the Web site www.pnhp.org.

Patricia Olmstead

Brookings


Single payer is a good option

Editor,

In his letter to the editor on July 18, Jeff Tribble spoke about the astronomical costs of government-mandated healthcare.

I share his concern about the costs required for most healthcare proposals. But, I also recognize that we must do something to control healthcare costs. Maintaining status quo simply means that the costs of private health insurance will continue to escalate beyond what any of us can ever afford.

One proposal for healthcare reform would actually cost no more than we, as a nation, currently spend on health insurance, and would give us more healthcare than we’re now getting. Single payer, universal healthcare is an economically conservative plan that would cover everyone and include more services (such as dental, mental health and prescription drugs) than most of us currently receive through our private insurance plans. All with no premiums or deductibles.

We hear very little about HR 676, because it doesn’t depend on private insurance. Insurance company lobbyists want to be sure that you don’t hear about it, and, especially, that you don’t know the many benefits of HR 676.

Under our current system, 25-30 percent of every healthcare dollar goes to overhead. By creating a single financing agency, HR 676 reduces that overhead cost to less than 5 percent. With that extra 20-25 percent, we could cover everyone, and eliminate co-pays and deductibles. And, it wouldn’t require trillions of added dollars!

To avoid astronomical healthcare costs and gain quality healthcare for yourself and your family, call, e-mail and write your representatives, urging them to support single payer healthcare as found in HR 676. For our senators, the corresponding bill is S. 703. Act quickly, as decisions will be made soon.

Linda Bozack

Brookings


Where the U.S. is heading

Editor:

Regarding the Saturday, July 18, issue (of the Pilot): Three headlines jump out as examples of the connection among the current national, state and local political agenda, and a clear indication as to where this nation is heading:

•Withdrawal of federal plan angers Curry officials;

•South Coast unemployment at 15 percent;

•Oregon gets millions to prevent homelessness.

Does anyone get this?

•Salazar was just carrying Obama’s water of Hope and Change to Southern Oregon! They have taken a simple issue, cut and sell timber for jobs that support our communities with earned revenue, and turned it into a major complicated problem by turning back the clock to a chaotic conglomeration of governmental and political groups: O&C Lands, Bureau of Land Management, Northwestern Plan, Department of the Interior, Western Oregon Plan Revision, not to mention the illustrious U.S. Congress! Did you get all that? They don’t want you to get it!

•Then the 15 percent unemployment is directly tied to the simple fact we can’t cut our timber and manage our own natural resources to support ourselves and community, because they are “locked up” by the feds and the state, dictated by “the religion of junk science.” Conservation and stewardship by a free people of a community be damned.

But never fear, Hope and Change are on the way; they are sending us money they just printed so we won’t go homeless!

Sue Adams

Brookings


Why was good road repaved?

Editor:

Several weeks ago the roadway under the south bank of the Chetco River Bridge was completely repaved.

This section of road is approximately 750 feet long and 46 feet wide. I live on the south bank and travel that section regularly. There was absolutely nothing wrong with the road surface – no potholes, no cracks, no deterioration.

We continually hear from the county, “We are broke,” “Where will we get more money.” I have two questions for the county commissioners/roads superintendent:

•How much of our “We don’t have any money” did it cost?;

•Why was a perfectly good road surface repaved?

Please, county commissioners/roads supervisor answer me – “us” the taxpayers.

Lee Forrest

Brookings