Letters to the Editor published Wednesday, July 1, 2009

Written by The Curry Coastal Pilot July 01, 2009 09:42 am

Obama, don’t force plan on us

Editor:

As we delve into the health issue that President Obama is so desperate to push through as he did the $787 billion bailout, I’m reminded about the letter to the editor (Pilot, Jan. 10) from a gentleman that was proud to be the administrator of the Veterans Administration Hospital in Roseburg even though he admitted they couldn’t keep up with the patient load and transferred these waiting to Portland.

Even though part of a poorly-run government program it was still his wish to have a government run health program. Even before his article was published we were all aware of the deplorable conditions that many VA hospitals were in, and this past week we learned that 10,000 patients getting cancer radiation treatment in three Virginia and Philadelphia locations have been exposed to hepatitis and HIV from equipment that was not sterile.

Diane Sawyer hosted a question and answer show and President Obama was the star. A CEO of Aetna Insurance was asked to please tell our president why insurance companies make billions each year? The loaded question by Ms. Sawyer was answered head on. Paraphrasing – when your competitor on the field is also the rule maker and the referee of the game it’s impossible to win, but if the government, the insurance company, along with a medical board sat down together it’s very likely a comprehensive, affordable plan could be ironed out.

I say politicians should not be allowed to devise and force their plan on us unless it’s the exact, same plan they have and (is) affordable!

Clay Dalrymple

Gold Beach


Setting priorities on education

Editor:

I was amused by the response I received from Beverly Duncan (Pilot, June 27) to my previous letter regarding “priorities” versus education of our children, and I would like to respond.

I think my “concern” is fairly obvious. I wouldn’t think the value of a good education, and vocational training, would be questionable to anyone these days. First Ms. Duncan, I am not “unhappy” as I was merely pointing out “lower priority” projects that could be ranked below the need for educating our youth.

Perhaps I can point out two more examples like the Welcome Center at the border and moving the Weigh Station. I am over 65 and both of our boys graduated from college. They are both gainfully employed and have never had to come to us for assistance. I suspect that without their educational backgrounds they might both be flipping burgers and living with my wife and me. Keep in mind though, that we do “need” burgers flippers. The “key” to longevity and prosperity for the U.S. is the educational and vocational training of up-and-coming future generations. Without carpenters, plumbers and electricians you, indeed, could be living in a tent. Without engineers you might, indeed, be living on a dirt road, or a simple path. Without doctors, you might be dead.

I was surprised that my letter would stir up so much angst with Ms. Duncan. Apparently, anyone presenting ideas not meeting with Ms. Duncan’s approval should move out. That seems to be somewhat of a common behavior around these parts.

Finally, I am happy right where I am, thank you very much.

Mike Schrum

Brookings


Send bill to the kitty litter box

Editor:

The U.S. House of Representatives today passed the Cap and Trade bill then went on vacation hoping that we would forget what they did in the next week.

My understanding, in return for our vote, those representatives will vote for good things for their constituents. This bill – they are telling us (usually they are low in estimates) – will increase our electric bill by double.

Can someone help me understand how paying twice the amount to stay warm this winter – when it is hard enough to make the bills now – is a good thing? Twice the bill to keep the lights on at the library or now we have gone to four days to save on school costs how are we going to pay double for all the electricity that schools use? How is it a benefit to a restaurant or me for it to cost twice as much to cook the food? Maybe we should serve everything like sushi style.

Cap and Trade is supposed to be an environment bill, but there is nothing in it about our environment. Our climate has been level since 2001, if all of our industry dies or goes overseas to countries that do not regulate their energy and have no restrictions on pollution then we have lost all and have not solved anything. In that bill that just passed there were 1,300 pages and no copy on the floor to be read. I thought they just did that sign then read thing; would you buy a house under those conditions?

This bill next goes to the Senate to decide if they can club us some more. If  you don’t want to run school by candlelight then maybe you should let your senators know that this bill needs to go to the kitty litter box because it stinks.

Janet Hughes

Brookings

 

Citizens, where is your voice?

Editor:

Bring your voice to “Taxed Enough Already” (TEA) Party, Saturday, July 4, at noon on Railroad Street near Fifth Street.

We plan to have Washington D.C. hear us from “sea to shining sea.”

We the people are tired of spend-spend-spend; help send a message that you, too, have had enough.

Last week Congress passed the biggest tax increase in American history called “cap and trade.” Are you going to do anything before the Senate passes it into law? Let every senator hear from coast to coast that you have had enough and they will be looking for a new job – without health insurance – if they pass this cap and trade.

This climate-energy bill will immediately increase your electric bill by approximately $165 next year and increase you and your children’s taxes in the years to come at an unbelievable rate.

If we don’t stand up now, when will we? Our founding fathers gave us a country we can be proud of; they also challenged us to see if we could keep it.

See you at the TEA Party.

Sandra Ensley

Brookings


Sorry for voting Rhodes, Waddle

Editor:

This is my apology to friends and all the voters I asked to support George Rhodes and Bill Waddle in their bids to become Curry County commissioners.

Their vote to increase their salaries was an insult to me and all who placed trust in their promise to serve the citizens of Curry County. They knew the established salary of the positions they were seeking to fill. They also knew the salary was for a contracted term of four years. They have served less than a year of their four year contract. There was no mention in the voter information I received of COLA in the salary of a Curry County commissioner position. COLA is paid to hired hourly and salaried employees.

I consider their COLA vote a breach of their contract with me and those who elected them to the positions. Their job performance to date has produced no accomplishment that would warrant a bonus. Many of us have witnessed the TV appeal on channel 9 for repair of the Curry County Jail. The COLA they voted for themselves would buy a few jail toilets.

Curry County property owners will soon pay more tax on our properties. This is a reduction in available money for food and other living expenses. We will not receive COLA to replace the tax. Curry County business owners receive no COLA. A recall would certainly get my vote.

Larry Aslinger

Brookings


Nationalized healthcare? No!

Editor:

Health care redistribution is coming!

The ruse is, national health care will bring needed health care to the poor and illegal immigrants. Like income redistribution, those with health care plans, private or public, will lose some benefits so those without get coverage. Plans exceeding national standards will be taxed.

During elections, Democrats have scared seniors with Medicare loss, but now it’s Democrats taking it away in the name of national health care. And think being younger or having your own coverage means no affect on you, you are wrong. National health care includes rationing to reduce costs. In your 80s and need hip replacement or cancer treatment? Forget about it: not “cost effective.” Younger? Get diagnosed (or not) with something and you won’t get diagnosis confirming MRIs/CAT scans: not “cost effective.”

Wherever nationalized health care is practiced waitlists and rationing are the rule, including here in the U.S.A.: Military and VA. My (then 60 year old) husband wasn’t told about his cataracts by military hospital personnel, including a “top” ophthalmologist: they didn’t want to fix them. Just a sampling I’ve experienced: botched hand surgery; week-long blurred vision from wrong eye drops; and a corpsman declaring my broken foot not broken/no X-rays needed, by sight with my shoe on. We’ve collectively 50-plus years experience with military and VA health care: can’t recommend it. The VA isn’t the standard for federal health care, either.

Do not be duped. Unless you can afford to pay cash for health care, don’t let it be nationalized. Contact your senators/congressman today!

Dianne Daniels

Gold Beach


Gutting the Rule of Law

Editor:

When our founders created our Constitution they warned their posterity that if they wanted to retain their liberty and prosperity it would be necessary to maintain morality and virtue.

On Friday, June 26, the entire American news media shamelessly and continuously eulogized, idolized, immortalized and otherwise went totally berserk over news of the “shocking” death of a child-molesting human freak show. Ironically, at the same time on CSPAN the House of Representatives were debating and voting on what was described as an “historic” climate change bill that is no less than the most treasonous and fraudulent piece of legislation in the history of the Republic. It will gut what is left of the Rule of Law, it will finish off what is left of our manufacturing base and, it will “erect a multitude of new officers and send hither swarms of officers to harass our people and eat out their substance.” Now, where have I seen that before? If this bill passes the Senate, this nation and its people will be on the threshold of Armageddon.

And what should the American people expect. From Kinsey’s two volumes of fraud and filth to today’s indoctrination of school children into homosexuality we have abandoned truth, reality, and common sense. We have allowed our government to bankrupt our nation. We have permitted infanticide through late-term abortions.

We have failed  to heed our founders’ warnings and now it’s time to pay the piper.

Arthur D. Larason

Harbor 


Many help art camp happen

Editor:

Summer Art Camp in Brookings is under way!

A huge thank you to all who made this possible. With finances in dire straits this year, and no place to have art camp, I was not sure we could even continue this much-wanted program. Right up to the week before we were scheduled to start camp, we still didn't have a location to hold our classes.

But after much prayer, phone calls, searching and the help of several of you wonderful Brookings folks, we are now up and running at the Masonic Lodge. On behalf of the kids, Thank You all. Thanks to the brethren at the Masonic Lodge for being so kind to us and for taking us in and supporting our program for kids. Thank you to the Wild Rivers Community Foundation for supporting summer programs like ours. The grant I received was enough to get some of the supplies paid for.  I also need to thank PBAA and the fine folks at the Manley Art Center for their financial aid. A huge thank you to others in the community who want to see the arts continue in our youth. Special thanks to Nola and Ken Range, Reena Jones, Jo Mochulski, Festival of the Arts, Azalea Festival Auction, artists Don Ross and Larry Johnson, Wayne Brisco, Yvonne Peterson, Bob Ward, the South Coast Fishermen, Slamm’n Salmon folks and others whose names I might have forgotten to mention. All of you are appreciated.

You will continue to see art around town by these kids, so please stop by, pay attention and maybe even purchase some of their art. We plan to hold Summer Art Camp until the end of July at the Masonic Lodge and all kids ages 7-14 are encouraged to come and try it. We meet on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays only from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It costs $8 a day. We are taking advantage of those free lunches at the high school cafeteria, too.

If you have any questions please call (541) 469-4590.

Janeen Vick

Brookings


Need skilled trades people

Editor:

The idea that all high school students should take college prep classes is impractical.

Many won’t go to college for various reasons. There are already plenty of unemployed college graduates. Jobs in the U.S. for college graduates can easily be filled with professionals from foreign countries. Where do you go when you need manual labor done?

We need skilled people in the trades locally. Rather than cutting shop classes at our high school, we should be adding to them. Why not offer basic electrical wiring, plumbing, plumbing repairs, auto maintenance, landscaping, organic gardening, small engine maintenance/repair, simple remodeling/home maintenance, etc. These skills are practical for everyone and could lead a student to get more schooling in a trade.

More students will drop out of high school because they will not be successful in the courses that are left for them to take as electives. Besides, how frequently have you used many of the courses that you took in high school? Some of the electives offered at the high school may be interesting and perhaps fun, but they need to be evaluated for their usefulness. Fun and interesting classes can be taken through the community college. Advance Placement classes are good to offer, but in hard economic times perhaps those classes should be cancelled. Students could take those that do not fulfill other requirements, such as the four years of English, at the community college.

I am hoping that the new school board members will request a reevaluation of the electives and extracurricular activities that are offered.

Dee McMahon

Brookings