SCHOOLS' ENROLLMENT KEEPS GROWING
September 08, 2000 11:00 pm

Enrollment continued to grow in the Brookings-Harbor School District during the first week of classes.

Dr. Paul Prevenas, district superintendent, said the total had grown to 1,920, up from 1,845 earlier in the week.

He said it reversed what appeared to be the beginning of a trend during the last school year. The enrollment has reached the point where most classes are about the right size.

There are a few pushing 30 students per teacher in the lower grades, and some high school classes have about 30. That is more than the ideal, he said.

The fifth grade has resumed the distinct of being the largest in the district. Dr. Prevenas said the total grew to 182. That includes the 99 fifth graders who are attending Upper Chetco School. That school has only fifth graders for the first time.

Earlier in the week, the ninth grade was the largest class with 178. That was a surprise to the school district.

Although the 1,920 was considered to be a healthy enrollment, it was not an all-time high. Dr. Prevenas said the enrollment reached nearly 2,000 the year before last.

Kalmiopsis Elementary has the biggest enrollment in the school district with 651 pupils. They include 129 kindergartners, 105 first graders, 139 second graders, 115 third graders and 163 fourth graders.

The high school is the next largest with 150 seniors, 159 juniors, 157 sophomores, and the 178 freshmen.

Azalea Middle School has 612 students, including the 99 who are at Upper Chetco. They include 182 fifth graders, 146 sixth graders, 137 seventh graders and 147 eighth graders.

The districts total students figure also includes 16 students who are attending alternative education classes. Dr. Prevenas said the alternative program grows as the year progresses.

The district checked with Brookings-Harbor Christian School, and found that 60 students are enrolled in regular classes. There are another 13 enrolled in the Christian Schools pre-school program.

The enrollments are going down in other coastal districts. Gold Beach is going down, for example. Dr. Prevenas said the junior varsity football game scheduled Friday with Brookings had to be called off because Gold Beach did not have enough players to field a team.

Dr. Prevenas confirmed that some classes started without having all of the needed text books. He said the district bought $150,000 of new language arts books from three publishers. He said not all of the books were delivered. That is expected with such a major purchase.

It is a concern, but it is not a major problem, he said. The problem is in the lower grades where it is less severe in the upper grades. He said it would be a bigger problem from a high school English teacher dependent on having a certain text. The lower grade home room teacher who teaches all subjects can work around it, he said.