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Walking among Oregon’s giants

Sunshine breaks through the branches of towering redwoods just feet from the start of the Oregon Redwoods Trail #1107. The Pilot/Jef Hatch
Sunshine breaks through the branches of towering redwoods just feet from the start of the Oregon Redwoods Trail #1107. The Pilot/Jef Hatch
The trailhead provides access to two of the U.S. Forest Service’s (USFS) trails in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest; the Oregon Redwoods Trail #1107 and the Oregon Redwoods Barrier Free Trail #1106.

Trail #1106 is 11 miles from Brookings up Winchuck River Road and begins at the edge of the parking lot. It is approximately 1/2 mile long with a loop at the end. The trail is wide and, according to the Forest Service website, is wheelchair accessible.

One of the attractions that makes hiking the full loop worthwhile is a naturally-hollowed redwood that hikers can walk into and see out the top. The forest service has built a deck that leads into the opening so that it can be entered without difficulty.

The second trail — Oregon Redwoods Trail #1107 — is 1.2 miles and begins approximately 500 feet from the start of trail #1106, tying back into the loop at the end of the trail.

The trail descends into the Moser Creek drainage and, according to the USFS website, provides access to, “a grove of majestic old-growth redwood trees.”

“Redwood trees found on the Chetco Ranger District represent the only coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) found in the Pacific Northwest Region,” the website states, “located at the limit of their northern range.”

Hikers will have the opportunity to listen to nature without the interference of modern development and try to spot the tops of old-growth redwood trees that tower hundreds of feet in the air.

The location and distance from Brookings (11 miles) may be one of the reasons that these gems in the crown of the USFS trail system are underutilized but, no matter the cause, they remain as short, easy hikes with a plethora of sights.

According to Gold Beach Ranger District employee Theresa Miller, the time of year could also be one reason that the trail seemed unused.

“We’re just coming out of winter and spring into the beginning of summer,” she said, “and a lot of the trails just aren’t being used that much yet.”

Getting there

To reach the trailhead, hikers should take Hwy. 101 to Winchuck River Rd. and head east.

Approximately 2 miles inland turn right on Peavine Ridge Rd and travel for another 4 miles to the trailhead parking. 

A vault toilet, picnic table and fire pit are available for public use in the parking lot for the trailhead.

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