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News arrow Opinion arrow Letters to the Editor arrow Letters to the Editor published Saturday, May 5, 2012

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Letters to the Editor published Saturday, May 5, 2012

 

Obama elected, what do you see?

Editor: 

I am on record as proclaiming, back in 2008, that if Obama gets elected, America will become an Obama nation. 

As the whole world is aware, Obama did get elected, and – well? What do you see?

Now, I know that far too many Americans are not mentally tall enough to see the reality, and if you’re not unhappy with the way our country (and our very way of life) is heading, then go ahead and vote for him again. After all, the alternative is not all that promising. 

What the heck, it can’t last much longer anyway. 

C.L. Grove

Harbor 

 

Question motives of negative people

Editor: 

Curry County is one of the most beautiful and peaceful places on earth. Every day I’m blessed to work with capable, compassionate people dedicated to helping others. 

It’s painful to read partial truths, distortions and blatant lies in the newspapers. It’s uncomfortable to talk with residents (including family and friends) who read and believe the falsehoods. 

Times are tough for many people in Curry County and around the world. Things will not get better until we work together in positive, constructive ways instead of trying to destroy the good works that are being done. 

Why would people intentionally mislead others? Answer: ego, power, greed. People with these motives undermine important outcomes that could be achieved. PLEASE – question the motives of negative people who work tirelessly to prevent positive change within our community. Do not take what they say at face value. Do not make snap judgments. Search beyond what you hear and find the TRUTH. 

We can achieve many good things if we strive for what is good and right and reject destructive influences. At the end of the day, week, month, year, lifetime – truth and integrity matter. 

Lavonne Bradford

Gold Beach

 

Two groups should work together

Editor: 

In regard to Scott Graves’ article Wednesday, April 25, “Council at odds over group’s request for funds.” 

Due to the economical status of today, it is a good idea to approve a one-year contract for the Brookings Harbor Chamber as it will keep options open for the ensuring years when the economy picks up again. 

My experience as a member, I found that the Brookings Merchant Association did indeed support the businesses in the city, whether these businesses belonged to the association or not. The chamber has many ways of obtaining revenue, motel, membership dues, promotions, etc. In order for them to promote the businesses, one has to belong to the chamber. Yes, they put on a lot of advertising for the city and the Port of Brookings Harbor. Many businesses cannot afford the membership dues required to belong to this organization. 

I agree they have been very frugal with the funds they have received. However, I have belonged to county and city chambers before. We worked together and pooled our resources for the betterment of the city and community, and we worked closely with the non-profits. We determined that this was the only way this small county, towns, cities, and organizations could make a real difference in improving the economic situation because at that time, there was also an economic crisis. 

My recommendation is for the two entities to work together and share the “wealth”; each has their own job to do so in that area there is not real conflict. If they worked together you would see a big difference, economically in advertising and participation for the community. 

Marie E. Garcia, former business owner/ member Brookings Merchants Association/ member US Chamber of Commerce

Brookings

 

Where do the kids get the alcohol?

Editor:

I have read numerous articles recently on underage drinking and have a question. Where do kids get the alcohol? 

If you are one of those who give or sell alcohol to young people please consider that what you are doing can only end in heartache for the child, their family and friends.  

For those receiving the alcohol, remember that the provider has an agenda and is going to take advantage of you in some way. One way or another you will pay a price and it can be huge. Bigger than you can even imagine.

The best thing to do is say “NO” to the person and contact a responsible adult and turn in the provider whoever they may be. Even if it is a family member or so-called friend. Believe me you will be doing them a favor by turning them in before something happens to you and they have to live with knowing they had a part in whatever that may be.

Take heed and thanks for reading.  

Lyle Dykes, father and grandparent

Gold Beach


Waddle knows what’s going on

Editor: 

Voters, do you remember the voters’ forum in the library four years ago? 

At that time candidate Bill Waddle stated what would happen in our budget the next four years, and he was correct. 

He is intelligent and knows what is going on. 

Wouldn’t you rather have someone who has experience with our county budget than someone who just wishes the situation were better?

Knowledge and experience do count! 

Carol King

Brookings  

Helmer could have used some help

Editor: 

The ordeal of Charley Helmer reported in the Pilot (April 25) indicates a sad story of a man possibly with a mental disorder or developmental disability falling through the cracks in the system. 

Here is another individual who may have benefited from the proposed Curry County Mental Health Court now placed on hold due to a lack of funding. Perhaps the Court could have ordered a mental health evaluation when he refused a lawyer to rule that he was not competent to represent himself. 

To say he was seen wandering the streets may not have noted that he was walking to his destinations because he has no other means of transportation. I have seen him at the library, stores, and other locations. 

Joe Willett 

Harbor

 

Brookings is the heart of Oregon

Editor: 

Thank you Brookings. Last Friday I looked forward to walking my dogs on Railroad, after a stressful morning. 

The sun was shining and two lovely ladies popped out of their work to say hello. Then all of a sudden – out of nowhere – a black lab jumps out and starts after the dogs. 

In the twists and turns and confusion, my Zoe takes off running, after slipping out of her harness. The next thing I know, these two lovely ladies start running after my Zoe. While I am in a tangled mess and fear growing throughout my body, the frustration and the tears were flowing,– but also flowing were people. I mean one person after another, coming to my aide. 

A wonderful person even going as far as shoving all the rest of the dogs and I into her van – determined to help find my Zoe. The police on duty were looking and offered kind words to a teary, eyed, dog lover. A man in a red truck saw me, a sweet lady at McDonald's taking my phone number in case she saw her. The love was empowering. 

Then after going home, the phone rang. Lisa, Kerry, from Kerr’s, found her and they stayed with her until I flew to my dog’s arms. 

Thank you. Brookings is the heart of Oregon.

Ede Viale 

Brookings


George Rhodes has my vote

Editor: 

George Rhodes has many qualities that make him the best choice for county commissioner.

He is honest, intelligent, has the ability to commit and a strong work ethic. He also, maybe most importantly in this case, has experience, not only as a commissioner but also as a successful businessman. He has a good understanding of the principles involved in creating and running a business and the importance of keeping a close eye on the bottom line. 

This business background is essential at this time to recognize and separate the necessary from the unnecessary and even wasteful spending by the county. 

I have always found George to be willing to talk to anyone with concerns about the running of the county, whether they make an appointment or run into him on the street, he is readily available.

Brian Scott

Harbor 

 

Let’s do something about welcome sign

Editor: 

I drive into Brookings at least six or seven times a week and have to look at the ugly “Welcome to Brookings” sign. 

The green of the tree is not the color of our beautiful fir trees – and the gulls (I think they are gulls) are beige in color. Has anyone ever seen beige gulls? Where is the most beautiful blue of our ocean anywhere in the scene with maybe some whitecaps? 

Please, with all the excellent talent we have in Brookings, do something to make the sign really mean “Welcome to our beautiful town.” 

Gerry Good 

Brookings 

 

Empson seeks real change for Curry

Editor:

We have read the letters regarding various candidates for county commissioner and we feel obligated to present our views.

We have known Greg Empson first as a neighbor and then as a friend. He was a successful businessman who worked in the tourist trade for 30 years and now a Curry County resident who is alarmed at the lack of business sense in the current administration.

Greg is not running for a $63,000 job (with benefits) but because he sees, without a real change in the approach to our current problems, the county will become a symbol of failure.

Marian and Gil Davis 

Gold Beach

 

It’s time not to vote for Good Ol’ Boys

Editor:

I first voted in a Brookings/Curry County election 12 years ago. The Good Ol’ Boys who were running shared the same platform and slogan: “Vote for us. We have never voted to raise taxes.” Twelve years later, here we are.

This is the time NOT TO VOTE for Good Ol’ Boys, not anyone in the Good Ol’ Boys club nor any Good Ol’ Boys wannabees.

This is the time to vote for the two experienced candidates who have a history of getting things done legally and transparently and who have worked for the county’s interests, not for special interests.

This is the time to vote for Lucie La Bonté and Susan Brown.

Harry Freiberg

Brookings

 

Rightwing talking points don’t fly

Editor:

I’m writing to recognize the writers of a thoughtful letter which appeared in the April 28 edition of the Pilot. 

Their screed succeeded on several levels: They demonstrated mastery in their use of rightwing talking points created with great care and expense before being thoroughly field tested by Fox News, Rush Limbaugh, etc. 

Cleverly, they were able to play the race card by attempting to insult the American voter’s intelligence in using a not-so-subtle suggestion that Americans who voted for President Obama did so in order to prove that they’re not racist. 

Finally, they trotted out a shiny new gem making its way round the tea party ‘n talk radio circuit: Record high gas prices are President Obama’s fault! 

Had they thrown in a little of that stuff about corporations deserving the same rights afforded We the People, and that President Obama may not actually be an American, and taken a few cheap shots at women, students, gays, and the poor, it would have been a grand slam! 

Great job, y’all!

Bruce Chambers

Brookings 

Need someone new to represent Oregon

Editor:

When Bill Clinton and the radical environmentalists created the Northwest Forest Plan, we were told that each pair of Spotted Owls needed 2,500 acres of old growth timber to survive. 

Now, 20-some years later, Spotted Owls are still in decline, due to Barred Owls. The real tragedy however is that millions of acres of timberland have been taken to protect this “endangered species.” This taking was from both USFS and BLM, and without the land base, the goals of these agencies cannot be met. This has been the death knell for the O&C counties. 

How can these agencies manage their shrunken land base to supply a steady revenue flow for the counties? Remember timber sales are subject to unrelenting scrutiny by groups who oppose logging. For a sale to come to fruition it can take years of hearings, discussions and lawsuits, it would be easier to pump oil through the Keystone Pipeline! Add the fact that it takes 60-80 years to grow a marketable tree and you have an unworkable system, no longer physically able to provide essential revenue to our counties.

Peter De Fazio is telling us he can buck this convoluted system and provide timber for logging, or is he using the current financial crisis as fertile ground for his re-election campaign. Remember, he is dedicated to his president, his party and himself; we Oregonians are last.

Let’s get someone new in Washington to represent Oregon!

Bill Dundom

Brookings

 

Susan Brown is best equipped to help

Editor:

We need competent long range thinkers as county commissioners.

We need people who not only execute good judgment in the present but also have the foresight and the ability to see problems/opportunities down the road and plan for them.

How could anyone experience the last four years and not plan for the increase in homelessness that would inevitably result? We’ve known for a long time that the fiscal challenges the county is facing were pending yet no real planning was done.

Beyond this, we need forward thinkers – individuals who are comfortable with finding and shepherding 21st century solutions to our current and future challenges, not individuals whose experience and mentalities are anchored solidly in the past. The idea of building large-scale, high-cost developments is very last century. 

What is coming is the need to foster an environment that will attract as much small business in various categories as possible. This is where the living-wage jobs will be that will allow families to move here and remain. It would definitely strengthen the tax-base, too.

A wise approach would be to look for ways to build a community and tax-base that relies on a diverse business model – one that provides the technological infrastructure required for small businesses that are not location dependent to relocate here and one that looks for ways to integrate the natural resources this area has with businesses looking for a “green” approach.

Susan Brown gets my vote for being the one best equipped to do this.

Eileen Sorrels

Harbor

 

Blodgett’s difficulties could be liabilities

Editor:

Facts are facts, Judie Hanson. 

Regarding your letter (Pilot, March 24) there are corrections and omissions which need to be addressed.  

“That incident,” you write about is singular and actually represents three DUII arrests of Leroy Blodgett. My quoting the Pilot verbatim is not “mud-slinging.” Another Pilot reader expressed concern regarding Mr. Blodgett’s difficulties that “could prove a serious financial liability to the taxpayers of this county.”  The moment Blodgett stepped into the public arena and chose to run for the highest office in Curry County, he abdicated the rules of privacy and personal conduct. 

Did you mean to completely ignore Mr. Blodgett’s written comments to the County Planning Commission? Comments easily interpreted as “mud-slinging” at citizens who hold opposing viewpoints.

Do you really think “the candidate with most experience and qualifications” would belittle and ridicule citizens who disagree with him? The appropriate candidate with the most experience has no special interest agenda to promote, is both inclusive and welcomes the opinions of involved citizens.  

The public’s right to know supersedes sensibilities, personal feelings and the reluctance to submit information that some prefer not to hear and others gossip about. 

Fortunately, in a free society the public decides who to vote for, unencumbered. 

Yvonne Maitland

Harbor

 

George Rhodes is a cut above

Editor:

This time around we have five candidates for Position 2. They are all good people, they all have the best intentions, they all seem to be qualified. It’s a hard choice. I finally settled on George Rhodes.

He is businessman. From decades of experience he knows almost instinctively what’s essential to run an operation and what isn’t. The last four years as a county commissioner have taught him how government differs from private business: what will fly and what won’t in these difficult times.

He does not rely on state or federal handouts, nor grants. Times have changed since the depression started: Those guys are in financial trouble themselves, and any handout will just result in more government and higher taxes – taxes we can NOT 

He agrees with all the other candidates that the county has proven resources (forests) that can keep us going, as long as we can get the federal government to allow us to use them. He has four years of experience in dealing in this area. He is not naive on the subject. That’s why he is considering all other possibilities for getting funding, including local taxes, knowing well that this turns voters off. He is just a straight shooter.

Some people are looking for  “change,” and they “hope” that a new broom will sweep better. But, look at the national level! Our new broom has made things worse. I’d rather stick with a guy who has his apprenticeship as a county commissioner in tough times behind him, has no illusions of what he might be able to achieve, and thus will not waste his time. And: George Rhodes is a workhorse, not often found in any level of government.

Horst Wolf

Brookings

 

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