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News arrow Opinion arrow Letters to the Editor published Saturday, March 3, 2012

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Letters to the Editor published Saturday, March 3, 2012

 

Down garden path to a Marxist hell

Editor:

Are Republicans racist or has the almighty Joe Blow’s leg been prodigiously pulled? 

After all, it was rascally Democrats who dabbled in such droll enthusiasms as the KKK, Jim Crow and Chevy Volt. Furthermore, the existential question persists why the Fickle Finger of Fate flipped touchy-feely Dems the bird and chose troglodyte Repubs to free the slaves. Go figure. 

The much ballyhooed vast right-wing bigotry may not be the biggest hoax since The Serpent snookered Eve, but the venomous drip, drip, drip of race-baiting and class warfare could trigger a societal Armageddon of biblical proportions. Jumpin’ Jehoshaphat! Stay tuned. 

And ponder this: The newbie Eve lost her garden yet gained the whole world and a heavenly paradise to boot. Conversely, today’s effete know-it-alls are being led down the garden path by forked tongue statists into a Marxist hell, regardless of race, creed, Constitution or whatnot.

Grace N. Laskey

Brookings

 

One-side coverage of budget options

Editor: 

Why don’t you do an article on the Citizens’ Committee and what they went through and what they really recommended? I think that you will find opinions quite different from what has been published in the paper. 

I believe you will find suggestions to balance the budget using the funds that they are currently taking in. Layoffs are necessary. (Bi-Mart is hiring.) Renegotiation of union wages and benefits must happen. Our sheriff could make use of the voluntary deputies. Our road service could use voluntary citizens to hold traffic signage. We have many citizens who can drive dump trucks, run excavators, etc. Parents can do voluntary teaching/assistance. 

Please print the other opinions besides those of the commissioners and the treasurer. By the way, I don’t personally know anyone who is in favor of a sales tax.

Ed. Ajimine 

Brookings

 

Why extra chlorine in my tap water?

Editor: 

Not long ago, I read in this wonderful paper, that we have some of the best rated water. I believe it was one of the top 10. 

Within a month, I noticed that the water began smelling heavily of chlorine. I thought perhaps there was some supposed need for a one time large chemical influx. I have seen no improvement over time. I turn on hot water and almost choke at the smell. It has gotten progressively worse since then with no sign of getting better. 

As a person who has been blessed to be taught about how chlorine is extremely harmful to the thyroid and debilitating to those who have no thyroid, I am concerned that this will continue. It lowers the immune system, and for people with no thyroid, it creates severe joint pain. I know first hand as my partner and I have been through this. 

I do not recall seeing any news regarding the addition of large amounts of chemicals and as it continues, I am asking if anyone has any pertinent information. Thank you. 

D. Huntting 

Harbor

 

Do all suggestions to balance budget

Editor:

Mr. Davis, your letter (Pilot, Feb. 29) makes some good points, but let’s look at some real facts.  

If we remove all three commissioners, we will have a gross savings of $264,000.  We then have to hire a county manager much like a city manager. Let’s assume we can hire one for $80,000 per year, which is low; we then have a gross saving of $184,000. These commissioners are not wealthy so therefore we need to pay at least expenses for the things they must do. Let’s add in a limit of $30,000, allowing $10,000 per commissioner. Now we have a net savings of $154,000. The Federal Government chopped $3,200,000 out of the county budget, and you just saved us $154,000.  Where do we get the other $3,046,000 from? You said, “Whatever it takes to maintain the county general services will be taken care of.” How do we do that? 

This was just one of the suggestions of our committee. We need to do all of them to solve the problem. If we do not solve the problem, the cost to everyone in this county will triple and more. I do not like raising taxes as we live on a fixed income, our Social Security. If you can come up with a sensible solution to fill in that hole other than what we have come up (with), do so and a lot of us will thank you. If not, the only choices we have are increasing our taxes, or, pay triple for any county service, sit on our front porches with a shotgun to protect our property and pray a whole lot. 

Dom Petrucelli

Brookings 

 

Hats off to those who help veterans

Editor:

Open letter to Sam Vitale and all veterans: In response to Sam Vitale’s letter printed in the Pilot Saturday, Feb. 25, 2012:

Way to go, Sam! Say it again and keep saying it. ...

“The willingness with which our young people are likely to enlist in our armed forces and serve in any war, no matter how justified, shall be directly proportional to how they perceive the veterans of earlier wars were treated and appreciated by their nation. ...” – George Washington (to the Continental Congress upon their creation of the Military Order of the Purple Heart).

Although these words were spoken 230 years ago, they remain as true today as they were then. A new generation of young Americans are once again deployed around the world, answering our nation’s wartime call to arms just as other veterans have done in the past.

Access to quality healthcare for veterans and current members of the U.S. armed forces has been compromised in recent years by budget shortfalls, rising medical costs, dramatically increased demand and, in some cases, by the audacious and unparalleled idiocy of some of our politicians who seem to be paying more attention to the naysayers than the plight of one of our nation’s most precious commodities, past and present: our veterans who have taken the oath and thereby placed their lives in harm’s way to answer their country’s call. 

And lest I forget, a terrific “hats off” to the following organizations who have given so much of their time and efforts on behalf of Vietnam Veterans of America; Brookings-Harbor Redshirts and our local Marine Corps League (please forgive if I forgot someone).

A veteran is someone who, at one point in their military life, wrote a blank check to the United States of America for an amount up to and including their life. That is an honor and there are too many who no longer understand that ... and more’s the pity. ...

Michael Pierce

Brookings 

 

Join campaign that benefits food bank

Editor:

Thursday March 1 begins the 15th annual Alan Shawn Feinstein $1 Million Giveaway To Fight Hunger campaign. During the months of March and April monetary and food item donations given in the campaigns name will be tallied to help Brookings Harbor Food Bank receive its part of Mr. Feinstein's $1 Million.  

On your donation check please indicate “Feinstein” and when you donate food please tell us that it is for the Feinstein Campaign.

“Whatever you donate to this agency, I will add money to it.  The more you give, the more of my $1 Million they’ll get - THANKS TO YOU!” Mr. Feinstein writes. “Thank you for sharing my heart, and the hope that –someday – no one will ever go hungry.”

This campaign has been beneficial to the food bank for several years. We receive between $300 and $400, thanks to this generous community.  

We will be looking forward to this year’s campaign and hope that total donations exceed the past year's totals.

Julie Davis

executive director

Brookings-Harbor Community Helpers

Food Bank

 

Think sales tax won’t hurt them?

Editor:

How poor is Curry County? Curry County is so poor that parents in China are telling their children to eat everything on their plates because people in Curry County are starving. Oh that’s right; it’s the government that is starving. 

A large portion of the residents of Curry County are retirees living in mobile home parks or RV parks on fixed incomes that earn well below the poverty level. The County politicians, employees and Pilot editorial staff think the retired folks living on fixed incomes should pony up more tax money to support the more than generous incomes and benefit packages of County commissioners and employees most taxpayers could only dream of. How many of you get a guaranteed 8 percent increase in your retirement check each year?

Government is a cancer and will grow according to how much money it can take from the people. The Feds guaranteed that Curry and other O&C counties would get a portion of revenue gained by the sale of timber on Federal land. When environmental extremists like House Representative Peter DeFazio killed logging in Oregon, the money dried up. Now the very same Peter DeFazio most responsible for destroying logging is riding in on his white horse to save the day by allowing logging on some Federal land again. These logs cannot be sold overseas and, in case you didn’t notice, no one is building anything over here. So where is the market for these logs?

This is a tiny County with a population of 22,000 people and a smaller tax base as many of those are children, two-thirds of whom get free breakfast and lunch at school because of poverty, and senior citizens living on $12 to $14 thousand a year. Think a sales tax wouldn’t hurt them?

Ralph Martin

Harbor

Sales tax should be a last resort option 

Editor: 

Open note to commissioners and managers: From what has been printed in the Pilot, and discussed by citizens throughout Curry County, I have come to the following conclusion: The current county commissioners seem to have formed the Citizens’ Committee with the pre-determined idea that they would “need” to have a county sales tax to continue the county operations humming along. 

I personally believe that the county sales tax should be a last ditch effort – not a first step by the commissioners. We are all aware that the assorted departments are struggling to keep their doors open and to provide mandated services. I say to the commissioners and city managers  –  you have a salary and benefits package that is the envy of many regular folks. You say you are in office because you want “to serve” the people of the area – so volunteer your time and services as many citizens do to help. Get off your duffs and get your hands dirty – meet your budgets just as we are forced to. 

I say, do not ask us to make more sacrifices. Because, as for me, I am unwilling to sacrifice more while some give nothing.

Mary Coston

Brookings 

 

Sales tax would be hard to get rid of

Editor: 

Please no sales tax. 

That would be another foot in the door that would be almost impossible to get rid of. 

The tax money that would come in would still be split up among all by percentages. That means the one that needs it most would still come out short: the county.

I feel to help fix the problem is put all the money back into a big pot, stir it up. Then make a new pie of percentages. It sure isn’t fair now. I’m not saying it’s a fix-all  but it would sure help. 

I feel the county is one of the most important and gets a small sliver of the pie. 

That’s my opinion. 

Herb Looney 

Brookings 

 

A radical idea to generating revenue

Editor: 

Here is a radical idea for generating substantial revenue for municipalities such as Curry County, Brookings, Gold Beach, and Port Orford. It is widely used in China but much denigrated elsewhere. 

The underlying principle is that farmers are entitled to make a comfortable living in agriculture and land developers are entitled to profit from improving land, but they are not entitled to profit through appreciation in the value of land. Many farmers have become wealthy by selling their land to developers for far more than its value as farmland. The developers then make unearned profits by rezoning the land for residential use, making it more valuable than farmland. 

In China, municipalities buy farms from the cooperatives that own them, rezone them for residential use, and resell to developers. The cooperatives and developers get fair prices, but nothing more. The municipalities get all of the gain from the increase in land value due to rezoning. 

In America, land can be taken for the public interest by the right of eminent domain. Sometimes this right is abused to benefit cronies, but taking farmland to generate more residential land could never be interpreted as cronyism. 

What could be more in the public interest than generating revenues for schools, roads, law enforcement, courts, health, safety, search and rescue, conservation, libraries, museums, parks, recreation, and animal control? Furthermore, taking farmland would not only generate revenue, it would make housing more affordable by increasing the supply of residential land, thereby dampening the upward pressure on prices. 

Leonard Azar 

Brooking

 

Support ban on smoking in parks

Editor: 

Since the Brookings Parks and Recreation Committee recommended the smoking ban to the city, I felt no need to speak up. My silence was not intended to be “proof enough that this issue is all smoke and no fire” as was written in your article. I am in complete agreement with the Committee. 

Why should anyone be subjected to smoke when going to the park for fresh air or other activities? Should my grandchildren or even I be subjected to cigarette smoke when attending a baseball or soccer game? Most of my friends who smoke do not do that and are very considerate of second hand smoke. Others are not! 

We should all be health conscious in this day and age. I lost a brother to cancer of the lungs and this is a very important issue to me. I would give strong warnings before giving such a stiff fine, however.

Patricia Patterson 

Brookings 

 

See both sides before passing judgement

Editor: 

This is to Planned Parenthood “baby death.” 

I just want to point out that there are two kinds of death, the quick never knowing you were ever here kind and then the being born to someone who does not want you and ending up in one foster care home or relatives home after another and knowing that no one truely ever loved or cared that you made it out into this world. 

Whether or not a fetus feels a little pain can hardly compare to a lifetime of heartache and suffering. There are some lucky children who get adopted and have a good life but many more end up lost and broken because they were never wanted and were still brought into this world without a care for their feelings. 

Try and see both sides of the issue before passing judgment. 

Heather Mathers

Brookings  

 

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