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News arrow News arrow Business arrow Y-MARINA SELLS NEW, USED BOATS

Y-MARINA SELLS NEW, USED BOATS Print E-mail
August 03, 2007 11:00 pm
John Borja sells a variety of ready-to-use boats at the Port of Brookings Harbor. (The Pilot/Tom Hubka).
John Borja sells a variety of ready-to-use boats at the Port of Brookings Harbor. (The Pilot/Tom Hubka).

By Tom Hubka

Pilot staff writer

The Port of Brookings Harbor's newest business is ready to set up members of the community with the boat of their dreams.

Y-Marina recently opened its doors in the Chetco Village. Selling both new and used boats for river and ocean sailing, Y-Marina offers well-known brands such as Seaswirl, Sea Ray, Duckworth, North River, Yamaha and Evinrude.

The company is based out of Coos Bay. Brookings Harbor Sales Manager John Borja said making the decision to open a local branch at the port was an easy one.

"Everybody said, ‘Do it,'" Borja said, laughing. "The owner, Scott Lancaster, always wanted an outlet here in Brookings and he finally got one."

Borja said the port location already has boats to sell that are ready to use. Depending on how business progresses, the store may add some additional wares for its consumers.

"As soon as we sell some boats, we'll start adjusting as to what we need in terms of accessories," he said. "The boats we have now are ready to run and ready to be sold."

The store currently sells handmade crab traps as well as boats.

Serious buyers can even schedule a "demo ride" for a particular boat, Borja said.

Y-Marina is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Customers can reach the store at (541) 469-5267 or (541) 247-0913.

 

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