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News arrow News arrow Business arrow Wednesday Farmers Market moves indoors starting Oct. 6

Wednesday Farmers Market moves indoors starting Oct. 6 Print E-mail
Written by Marge Woodfin, Pilot staff writer   
September 29, 2010 05:00 am

Kathleen Dickson, market manager for the Wednesday Farmers Market at the Chetco Grange Community Center, announced that the market will be moving indoors, Wednesday, Oct. 6.

Every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., shoppers will continue to find fresh produce from local farms, homemade, special bakery goodies, jams and jellies, and hot ready-to-eat specialties, plus arts and crafts from local artisans.

Dickson said, “In addition to local farmers and food artisans, we will have a few local crafters and artists, including Vi and Len Burton and jewelry artist Jean Johnston.”

She noted, “The market will flow well from outdoor to indoor, and this should help customers who enjoy shopping the market weekly.”

In addition to the Burtons and Johnston, others currently on the list of those ready to market their food and art at the indoor farmers’ market are Ocean Air Farms, Riyes Cottage Garden, Flora Pacifica, Fernwood Woolworks, Robin Hauser, Cathey’s Cookies, Cakes & Candies, chef Paul Grossi, and Village Baker, with more expected to join.

Specialties to be offered include, in addition to lots of fresh produce, the goat cheese, quiche and wild mushrooms from Robin Hauser’s local farm and hot biscuits and gravy and hearty soup served on the premises by chef Grossi, a master, professionally trained culinary artist.

Dickson emphasized that on Wednesdays the indoor winter market will be a great place to find an exciting array of comfort foods and creative gifts for the holidays.

The Grange Hall is located at 97895 Shopping Center Ave., Harbor.

For information about the market, contact Dickson at 541-813-1136

 

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