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WYNER OFFERING TRADITIONAL EAST COAST COOKING AT GO-GO'S

Go-Go's owner Linda Wyner is striving to make a restaurant for families. (The Pilot/Ellen Babin).
Go-Go's owner Linda Wyner is striving to make a restaurant for families. (The Pilot/Ellen Babin).

By Ellen Babin

Pilot staff writer

Traditional Italian-style cooking from the East Coast is the core of the menu at Go-Go's Family Restaurant, which opened it doors mid-April at 925 Chetco Ave. Brookings.

The restaurant is open 11 a.m. until 9 p.m. The phone number is (541) 469-0800.

Linda Wyner, the owner and operator, does not lack restaurant experience; she was raised in a family of restaurant owners. She also has managed different businesses throughout her life.

Her plans for the eatery include adding more dinner items to the menu and serving soft ice cream with ribbons of eight flavors throughout; root beer floats will also join the list of treats. Homemade desserts are already on that list.

Also prepared in the restaurant are turkey breasts and pot roast, coleslaw and sweet potato fries.

In addition to soft drinks, Go-Go's serves 10 kinds of beer. And the menu easily serves as dinner.

The meats she uses are the same cuts found in restaurants in the east, her purveyors are based in Chicago.

She gave as an example the Philly cheese steak; the cut of meat used is the same as used in traditional cheese steaks made on the East Coast.

Wyner is striving to make the restaurant for families and people of all ages.

In the dining area designed to be "clean and bright with an atmosphere suitable to families" are three-flat screen televisions – tuned to cartoons, sports and news channels.

Phone an order with 20 minutes lead time, and Go -Go's will bring the order to your car. Catering also is available.

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