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WINCHUCK BUSINESS ON THE WEB

Karen Clark uses computers as an online sales tool. (The Pilot/Ellen Babin).
Karen Clark uses computers as an online sales tool. (The Pilot/Ellen Babin).

By Ellen Babin

Pilot staff writer

Rustic is the key word to describe items offered for sale by a Winchuck River area resident on her new Web site, http://www.winchuckriverstore.com. Karen Clark describes her Web site wares as a unique selection of "perfect rustic home accents."

Clark, who moved to the area from San Jose, Calif., in 1999 with her husband Jim, began using the computer as a successful selling tool after consulting several books and attending eBay University in San Jose, Calif. She remains active on eBay discussion boards where other eBay sellers share their ideas and experiences.

A few months after beginning her eBay business in 2006, she became a Power Seller, with an average of $1,000 in sales per month for three consecutive months and feedback from at least 100 eBay buyers, of which 98 percent or more were positive.

She also became a Trading Assistant with eBay, which qualifies her to sell for others. Her eBay store can be accessed at http://stores.ebay.com/ winchuck-river-store.

Her knowledge is shared with others in the e-Bay classes she teaches at the Brookings campus of Southwestern Oregon Community College.

Karen Clark would like to begin a group, interacting with other people using eBay.

She can be reached by phoning (541) 412-0909 or by e-mail, at This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

She also encourages people to "check out our blog to see what we are up to," http://winchuckriverstore.blogspot.com.

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