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Slow Children produces video at Chetco Point

Slow Children – Bryan Bacci, Caleb Moffit, Kevin Hutman – produced a video with Vincent Gowman and Elmo Williams. The Pilot/Jef Hatch
Three Brookings men watch a nuclear explosion in the ocean off Brookings’ Chetco Point.

Oscar award-winning film director and Brookings resident Elmo Williams tosses a book into the fire.

A 9-year-old Brookings boy looking questioningly into the camera.

These are just a few of the jarring images that make up a new music video for the song “Learn to Love” by Brookings-based alternative rock trio Slow Children.

The band unveiled the video – its first – for family and friends during a private screening at Movino’s wine bar Monday. Everyone can see the video online at the band’s YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/slowchildrenlv.

“As a child I always wanted to be a movie producer – like Elmo,” said Kevin Hutman, drummer for Slow Children and director of the band’s video.

Hutman picked the band’s latest song, “Learning to Love,” because of it’s simple acoustic arrangement.

“I thought it would be easy to produce, and not cost a lot to do – but it wasn’t,” he said.

The video was filmed in the band’s studio, a friend’s living room and Brookings’ Chetco Point, he said.

Hutman enlisted the help of his friend Adam VanCleave, who contributed his high definition video camera and helped with editing. The video was produced by Blake Eiseman, who mixed and co-produced the band’s previous music CDs.

Hutman came up with the idea for the video in January. Three months and six hours of video tape later, Hutman and VanCleave had a finished, three-minute video.

The video starts with the band’s singer Caleb Moffit playing an upbeat melody on acoustic guitar in the studio. The other band members, Hutman and  guitarist Brian Bacci, are featured later in the video.

Getting Williams, a Hollywood veteran whose credits included “High Noon” and “Tora! Tora! Tora!” was a coup.

“I wanted to get a local celebrity and thought of Elmo,” Hutman said. “I told him about the video, about the plot, and he said he would do it – for free!”

After watching the video premiere Monday, Williams was pleased with the results.

“I’m always aware of budgets and costs, and I was more than happy to help out these young men with their project,” he said.

In addition to Williams and the band members, the video features Hutman’s 9-year-old nephew Vincent Gowman and friend Virgil Lemley.

“Vincent had a maturity about him that worked very well on video,” Hutman said.

The meaning of the song and subsequent video, which features visions of war and senseless death, is open to interpretation, but Hutman said, in the end, the video offers hope.

The story shows a father-figure (Lemley) handing a book to a young boy (Gowman). The boy reads the book as war-like images flash on screen. Wide-eyed, the boy places the book in a chest. Fast-foward many decades to find the boy an old man (Williams). The old man pulls the book out, reads some of it and tosses it into a roaring fire. The flames rise higher, but the book remains unharmed.

“The moral, I guess, is that you don’t have to agree with somebody’s else’s way of thinking; you can go your own way,” Hutman said.

Hutman will include the video with publicity material when promoting the band to media outlets. “It will help us get our foot in the door on radio and television,” he said.

Having an Oscar Award-winning director in the video doesn’t hurt, either, Hutman said.

“We can tell them, ‘Hey! It’s got an Oscar winner in it!’” he said.

~~~

After watching the video, fans of Slow Children can see the band perform a live, acoustic set Friday evening at the Party at the Port at the Port of Brookings Harbor boardwalk. Slow Children will also celebrate their 10-year anniversary by playing an electric set starting at 9 p.m. Saturday night at the 101 Bar and Grill in Harbor.

The band is also competiting in the Last Band Standing, underway in Eugene. On May 20, the band out performed two other bands to qualify for the June 3 finals.

For more information about Slow Children, visit their website at www.slowchildrenlv.com, or got to MySpace and Facebook.

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