>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow STROUD JOINS BROOKINGS MEDICAL CENTER

Print

STROUD JOINS BROOKINGS MEDICAL CENTER

By Kurt Madar

Pilot staff writer

Physician Assistant Eric Cameron Stroud is the newest addition to the Brookings Medical Center staff.

"We are just so excited to have him on board," said Curry General Hospital Health Network Community Relations Associate Moira Fossum.

Stroud has been a Physician Assistant (P.A.) since 1997 when he received his degree from University California Davis' Family Practice Program.

Before training as a P.A. Stroud worked with the California Department of Forestry and Marin County Fire Department as a paramedic.

During his time as a paramedic Stroud worked in a wide variety of emergency medical service roles ranging from helicopter and fire rescue to home care outreach programs for seniors and the chronically ill. He has also performed intensive care duties in the emergency room, intensive care unit and air ambulance.

Stroud also has training in hyperbaric medicine. He has worked at the Virginia Masons Hyperbaric Center and the Providence Portland Hyperbaric Wound Care Department.

According to the Hyperbaric Medicine Today Web site, hyperbaric medicine is a medical treatment administered by delivering pure oxygen at greater than sea level pressures to a patient in an enclosed chamber. The treatment elicits varying levels of response at different treatment pressures, durations and dosages.

As a treatment it is used in dive medicine primarily, which Stroud has a strong background, but has come to be used to treat a variety of conditions that are not dive related.

They include Cyanide-carbon monoxide poisoning, cerebral arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness, exceptional blood loss anemia, crush injuries, reattachment and suturing of limbs, thermal burns and even brown recluse spider bites.

Stroud actually lives with his family in Salem, Ore. He commutes to Brookings, staying three or four days, depending on the week.

"I love the coast," Stroud said. "I have daughter who is going to college. She kept up her end of the deal, getting good grades, now I have to keep my end of the deal and pay for school."

Stroud works for two care providers other than Brookings Medical Center when he isn't in Brookings.

During his few leisure moments Stroud enjoys kayaking or "spending time at home with a beer and doing yard work."

Print

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Greece votes in referendum with future in euro in doubt
    Greeks voted on Sunday whether to accept or reject the tough terms of an aid offer to stave off financial collapse, in a referendum that may determine their future in Europe?s common currency. The country of 11 million people is deeply divided over whether to accept an offer by international creditors that left-wing Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, elected in January on a promise to end years of crippling austerity, calls a ?humiliation?. "I voted 'No' to the 'Yes' that our European partners insist I choose," said Eleni Deligainni, 43, in Athens.
  • Chinese officials, investors hope new support steps will stave off stock crash
    China's stock markets may be facing a make-or-break week after officials rolled out an unprecedented series of steps at the weekend to prevent a full-blown stock market crash that could threaten the world's second-largest economy. An online survey by fund distributor eastmoney.com over the weekend, which polled over 100,000 individuals, said investors believed stock indexes would rise over 5 percent on Monday. China stocks had more than doubled in just 12 months even as the economy cooled and company earnings weakened, resulting in a market that even China's inherently bullish securities regulators eventually admitted had become too frothy.
  • Rubbing along with robots tackles Abe's double dilemma
    Factory worker Satomi Iwata has new co-workers, a troupe of humanoid automata that are helping to address two of Japan's most pressing concerns - a shortage of labor and a need for growth. The 19 robots, which cost her employer Glory Ltd about 7.4 million yen ($60,000) each, have eye-like sensors and two arms that assemble made-to-order change dispensers alongside their human colleagues in a factory employing 370. Glory is in the vanguard as Japanese firms ramp up spending on robotics and automation, responding at last to premier Shinzo Abe's efforts to stimulate the economy and end two decades of stagnation and deflation.

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2015 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use