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SALON ADDS BODY PIERCING

Body piercing by Sir James has become a part of All About You in the South Coast Center in Harbor.

James Carperitel, who goes by Sir James, calls his business Steel Body Art. He offers body piercing anywhere on the body, not just the ear lobes, he said.

Probably the most popular area of the body people have pierced is their tongue and navel, Sir James said.

Most people who come to see me want unique piercing, he said.

Sir James said he has been doing body piercing for the past 10 years. He became interested in the trade because he had friends in Medford who owned a shop.

He learned how to pierce body parts from them and went on to do an apprenticeship in Medford, Arizona and Los Angeles, he said.

After learning the trade, he came up to Brookings about two years ago. Then less than three months ago he opened his booth at All About You, he said.

Body piercing involves poking a hole through a persons skin. Traditionally this has involved poking a hole through the ear lobe so people can wear an earring.

Today, it has expanded to other parts of the body, including, as in Sir James case, upper and lower lips and tongue.

Little bleeding happens when the body is pierced, he said. But because his piercing instruments do make contact with body fluids, he keeps his tools sterilized.

I use an autoclave like doctors use to sterilize their instruments, Sir James said. The equipment he uses is surgical stainless steel.

Before the procedure takes place, Sir James said he also sterilizes the area to be pierced.

Sir James said his friends also have a tattoo shop. He said his goal is to open one here, too.

Body piercing services may be done by appointment. For an appointment, call All About You at (541) 469-1234.

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