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Restaurateurs enjoy getting to know customers

Feliza and Ken Wilson are proprietors of the new DoLittle Cafe at 613 Chetco Ave. in downtown Brookings. The Pilot/Jef Hatch
 

Feliza and Ken Wilson live and breathe the restaurant life.

The couple have worked at multiple restaurants, diners and coffee shops over the years. Feliza as a server, and Ken as a chef.

The couple also met at a restaurant; Feliza waited tables, and Ken cooked.

 

After working in various establishments for  13 years, Feliza and Ken decided to open their own place: the DoLittle Cafe. 

DoLittle, named after a family member’s logging company, is located at 613 Chetco Ave. It is open from 6:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. every day except Tuesday. It opened Oct. 24, and is starting to turn a profit.

It’s “a cozy little cafe,” Feliza said. It’s a “place to just sit comfortably, have a cup of coffee and be downtown.”

The restaurant may be a cafe, but the Wilsons offer customers a large menu.

“It’s not just a coffee house,” Wilson said. “People can eat something substantial.”

Breakfast is served all day as well.

The Wilsons also strive to offer quality products; they don’t use a deep fryer; and they offer spring greens instead of iceberg lettuce and red potatoes rather than frozen French fries.

The couple decided to move to Brookings from Idaho two months ago because they wanted to operate a small restaurant, and because they love the downtown location. 

“We wanted to blend in with the block,” Feliza said. 

The Wilsons also want to be able to sit  down and chat with regular customers.

“Get to know people, get to know the locals,” Feliza said.

Feliza and Ken have already started to become acquainted with customer Laurie Pedesta-Daniels, who has dined at DoLittle Cafe every day since it opened.

“I think it’s great,” she said. “I think it’s just what this town needed.”

Pedesta-Daniels loves the homestyle cooking, and that breakfast is served all day. She also likes that they are open for breakfast on Sundays.

Without pause, she said her favorite item is the eggs Benedict. For lunch items, Pedesta-Daniels recommends the burger, decker sandwich or soup.

An added element is Ken’s daughter Sadie, a senior at Brookings-Harbor High School. She helps out in the kitchen after school.

Feliza’s goal is to be consistent. 

“You can’t just go in and open a business and then leave,” Feliza said. “You have to be involved.”

Feliza said she’s tried other jobs, but sitting at a desk is not her cup of tea.

“I’ve always gone back to the restaurant business,” Feliza said.

 

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