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Ray’s Foundation effort nets $72,000 for breast cancer research, awareness

Three years into the Pink ‘R’ program, the Ray’s Foundation, supported by Ray’s Food Place customers and employees, has raised over $190,000 for local breast cancer research and awareness charities.

This year’s total, $72,101.65 exceeded the foundations goal by 44 percent and will benefit 11 local charities, selected by Ray’s Food Place store managers.

“After last years outstanding show of community support for the Pink ‘R’ campaign, we were expecting a good response for 2009,” said Alan Nidiffer, vice president and CIO of Brookings-based C&K Markets Inc. “We planned for a lower number to give to our 11 local charities and we ended up exceeding that number!”

The Ray’s Foundation will donate 100 percent of the funds raised through the Pink ‘R’ campaign to eleven local non-profit breast cancer research and awareness organizations. From Bend to  Eureka, Calif., the Pink ‘R’ campaign keeps local money raised with local organizations.

“We’re excited about the future of this campaign because it benefits our customers, our employees and our community,” explained Nidiffer.

The Ray’s Foundation is a non-profit organization within the C&K Market, Inc. family. Created by Ray Nidiffer, the company founder and namesake, the Ray’s Foundation mission is to assist local C&K Market community organizations that focus on improving the health, education and vitality of their community. Each year the foundation awards over $100,000 to organizations.

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