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ROTARY HEARS ABOUT BUSINESS PLANS Print E-mail
July 25, 2000 11:00 pm

The changes and plans for three downtown Brookings businesses Redwood Theatre, KBSC Television, and Java Java Coffee House were outlined Tuesday for the Rotary Club of Brookings-Harbor.

In addition, Terry Patterson told the Rotary Club that his family has plans to start up a farmers market in downtown Brookings.

The decision to paint the Redwood pink was controversial, even among family members, Patterson said, but it has been worthwhile in terms of advertising value. There are changes inside the theater as well including a new sound system. New seating has been ordered, Patterson said, and he hopes they can also upgrade the aging projector in the near future.

Patterson said more live events are also in the works at the Redwood, and that the theater is available for rent by private parties for events.

More live music is also in the works for Java Java, Patterson said, the nearby coffee shop that had been closed for several months. Other features of the shop, he said, include space for small group meetings and free internet access.

At KBSC, Patterson said plans are in the works for several additions to the programming, including a live call-in program to discuss community issues, and broadcast of both Brookings-Harbor High and Del Norte High sports events either live or taped.

Our plans might be a little ambitious, but thats what were aiming for, he said.

Asked about the stations signal, Patterson said it is now at 90 percent of its licensed strength on Channel 49. I can get the signal in most areas of Brookings and virtually all of Harbor, he said. KBSC is also available on Channel 9 Charter Communications cable line-ups in Brookings-Harbor and Crescent City.

For satellite customers, Patterson said, most companies will install a switch to allow viewers to go from satellite reception to regular antenna reception.

On the farmers market plans, Patterson said the group is looking at a parking lot near the new U.S. Post Office for its Saturday events. This is not a flea market, Patterson said. Were looking for produce and hand-crafted items and food booths.

 

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