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Quality Fast Lube now owned by longtime employees

Mike Kammeier and Olivia Davis now own Quality Fast Lube.
Mike Kammeier and Olivia Davis now own Quality Fast Lube.

Olivia Davis and Mike Kammeier are excited about being the new owners of Quality Fast Lube and Oil, 845 Railroad St., as of Jan. 1. They think it’s a great way to start the new year.

Although they just assumed ownership of the company, neither of them is new to the business. Davis has been working for the original owners, Tom and Carol Roades for 13 years, and Kammeier since December 2000.

“We are delighted and looking forward to offering the same expert service that our customers expect,” Davis said “We’re enjoying it and it’s gonna’ be fun,” Kammeier chimed in.

Davis, who started working at Quality Lube in March 1997, began writing up service orders, moved on to become assistant manager, and then manager, demonstrating her ability to run the business.

Kammeier, who is a certified lube technician, said, “I’m the basement bottom technician, doing oil changes and diagnostics under the cars and I’m learning new things about running a business.”

“He’s learning to deal with customers,” Davis said. “It’s exciting for us, taking courses in management, and making sure that our customers are happy.”

Before having the attorney draw up the papers, Tom and Carol Roades were obviously convinced that the young people were ready to run the whole shebang. “We had a meeting in August to talk about the business,” Davis explained.

“We want to thank Tom and Carol for giving us this opportunity, ” she added. She explained that her former employers were having some health problems and decided to retire. “They wanted to retire and go party a little bit,” Kammeier added.

Quality Fast Lube is currently open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The new owners have just added the Saturday hours to accommodate clients unable to bring vehicles in during the week and said that the hours are flexible and may be changed in the future if requested by customers.

“We will do diagnostic with no charge, triple code checks,” Kammeier said.

The new owners have issued an invitation to drop by and get acquainted, or for more information call 541-469-8874.

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