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PRIVATE POOL USED FOR THERAPY

Pacific Northwest Physical therapy has expanded to include aquatic physical therapy thanks to a Harbor resident letting the firm use her pool.

Carol Hastings, wife of the late lily mogul Bob Hastings, has leased her pool to the physical therapy office that serves Brookings and Crescent City, said Michael Zingg, physical therapist.

After negotiating the lease, Zingg got approval from the health department. Although he is already treating patients in the indoor pool, he is in the process of obtaining hand rails and a lift.

The pool, which varies between 3.5 and 5 feet deep, is maintained at a water temperature of between 88 and 94 degrees, Zingg said. This is warmer than pools used primarily for swimming.

Zingg said aquatic therapy helps in treating neurological problems, rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. It also helps post-surgical patients recuperate.

People can exercise with less pain because of less muscle tension, Zingg said.

One advantage of working-out in water is that depth of the water changes how much weight is placed on the muscles. The deeper the water, the more buoyant the body becomes, Zingg said.

The water creates no joint compression, yet provides resistance, Zingg said.

For an appointment, call Pacific Northwest Physical Therapy at (541) 412-1155. Physical therapy clients receive directions to the pool when services are rendered.

The physical therapy office is in the Brookings-Harbor Shopping Center in Harbor, next to the Performing Arts Center.

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