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News arrow News arrow Business arrow OWNERS OF SHIP ASHORE LANDMARK CALLING IT QUITS

OWNERS OF SHIP ASHORE LANDMARK CALLING IT QUITS Print E-mail
April 11, 2008 11:00 pm
Bobbie Mollison, who runs Shipboard Gifts inside the Ship Ashore, helps a customer Monday afternoon. The boat will remain where it is in Smith River. (Wescom News Service/Bryant Anderson).
Bobbie Mollison, who runs Shipboard Gifts inside the Ship Ashore, helps a customer Monday afternoon. The boat will remain where it is in Smith River. (Wescom News Service/Bryant Anderson).

By Kelley Atherton

Wescom News Service

SMITH RIVER – The grandiose yacht seems a bit out of place on the grass along Highway 101.

The enduring landmark next to the Ship Ashore Resort in Smith River, has been home to a museum and gift shop for more than 40 years. And for almost 18 years, it's also been home to Bobbie Mollison, and her husband Ray, who own Shipboard Gifts.

"Up until the last three years (business) was really good," Mollison said. The economic slowdown "knocked it down to nothing."

The gift shop has everything from toys to picture frames to sweat shirts – standard souvenir fare – that features a nautical theme. Mollison said the merchandise will be discounted 50 percent until everything is sold.

"Every year it would get slower," she said of the recent decline in business.

The tourist season during the summer and into the fall would provide Mollison with enough income to make it through the slow winter.

"That's the secret of business on the North Coast," she said. "I kept hoping it would get better."

Most of her customers come from Grants Pass and Medford. However, gas prices have kept people away, Mollison said.

She noticed a decrease in customer flow once the economy turned – the shop has been for sale for two years – but it wasn't always this bad.

"I wouldn't have been here 17 years if I hadn't been doing OK," Mollison said.

The Mollisons moved here 20 years ago when Ray got a job helping to build Pelican Bay State Prison. She took over the gift shop because it seemed like a good opportunity, Mollison said. She originally operated the Head Shed, a beauty salon in Smith River.

A perk was meeting people from almost "any country you can think of," Mollison said. She's learned a lot just talking to people who boarded the ship. In fact, Mollison stopped during an interview this week to help out a group of Tacoma, Wash., tourists, illustrating her point that she meets mainly out-of-towners.

Some of the stranger sights Mollison has seen involved people traveling across the country by alternative modes of transportation, such as bike, lawn mower or covered wagon.

There was also the cult leader and his many wives, she said, describing his long blue robe and black flowing hair.

The ship is a tourist stop for those traveling along Highway 101 to look through the museum of oddities and buy a souvenir or two.

The museum in the belly of the ship houses collections of preserved sea creatures such as a whale fetus, baby octopus and captured snakes. There are also artifacts from tribes across the globe, mannequins clothed in pirate gear and old military paraphernalia.

The collection has grown over the years with donations from the community, Mollison said.

The ship and museum will stay right where it is. Members of the Westbrook family – the owners of the boat, Ship Ashore resort and restaurant – are looking for someone to take over the gift shop.

Mollison is looking for a new job. She doesn't think she'll start another business.

"It's too hard on the North Coast," she said, then joked that if she did, it wouldn't be retail. "I told my husband it'd be either food, booze or gas."

 

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