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NAILS MATCH YOUR MOOD

Light Concept nails and mood-changing nail polish are two items that Chelsea Probasco said makes her nail technician booth different.

I am the only one in town who does them. Its kind of unique here, Probasco said, who works at Marlenes Salon at 1201 Moore St., in Brookings.

Concept nails are plastic, non-toxic, odorless, retain high gloss and do not stain, Probasco said.

The nails are common in big cities, but not well-known here, Probasco said. The application of this type of fingernail is something she learned in beauty college.

She said they are easier to deal with. With acrylic nails, she has had to open the windows to let the fumes out. They also turn yellow.

Because the Light Concept nails look more natural, they arent as obvious when the fingernail grows, thus people may go longer between fills, Probasco said.

The mood-changing nail polish is not actually affected by the mood of the person, but rather the temperature of the nail, she said.

Probasco demonstrated the color changes by running her fingers under cold water. The colder temperature made the nail a brighter color. When hands are warmer, the fingernails appear airbrushed.

She offers 25 mood-changing colors, she said.

For an appointment with Probasco, call (541) 469-5678.

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