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MoJoes, serving up locally roasted coffee

One of MoJoe’s owners, Anne Bouley, stands behind the counter of Brookings’ most recent coffee shop with Jason Ramsey, an employee. The Pilot/Marge Woodfin
They say that two heads are better than one, and owners of the newly opened MoJoes adjacent to MoVino Wine Bar appear to believe that four heads are even better.

MoVino’s owners Ken and Rebecca Streaker, television interviewer Candace Michel, and Anne Bouley, known for her cooking classes, on television and in magazines, have joined to offer special food and drinks at MoJoes, across the hall from MoVino, 625 Chetco Ave.

Bouley, whose article about wine maker Silvio “Tony” Ciccone, Madonna’s father, is featured in the latest issue of Food magazine, serves as chef in charge of MoJoes.

“I will be writing other articles,” she said.

The menu includes “Breakfast/Brunch and Sandwiches/Subs, organic espresso, Italian sodas, hot chocolate, gourmet pastries, and lunch specials with something different every day.”

“We serve organic, locally roasted coffee, the only ones in town,” Bouley said. She hastened to say that, although it is an espresso shop, a wide array of drinks is available, including smoothies (soon), blended iced coffee, lots of flavors, Chai and raspberry lemonade, as examples.

Bouley will prepare special-occasion cakes of any flavor. “Special requests can often be met, so don’t be afraid to ask,” she said. “All of our food is prepared fresh daily with only the best ingredients, and we offer sugar free treats upon request, plus flourless chocolate cake, totally gluten-free.”

She added, “I plan to offer homemade ice cream with special pastries within a week.”

Other advertised special features include Kid Friendly, Romantic, Live Music, Free Wi-Fi, and Outdoor Dining.

“We will probably have some mini concerts and kids are OK because we serve no alcohol,” Bouley said. “We want to make it a young people’s hangout.”

MoJoes is open Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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