>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow MUSE THEATRIX:AN ACTIVITY CENTER FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

MUSE THEATRIX:AN ACTIVITY CENTER FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Print E-mail
December 14, 2007 11:00 pm
Haley Farr works with kindergartners after school at Muse Theatrix. (The Pilot/Marjorie Woodfin).
Haley Farr works with kindergartners after school at Muse Theatrix. (The Pilot/Marjorie Woodfin).

By Marjorie Woodfin

Pilot staff writer

Haley McElle Farr is looking for support for her newly-formed Muse Theatrix, dedicated to teaching dance, gymnastics, yoga, cheerleading, and more, for children, teens and adults.

The organization is currently aimed at providing dance classes and after-school activities for children in kindergarten through high school. Kinder classes have already started, and Farr said she has had more than 50 youngsters in her dance classes, temporarily being held in the Veterans of Foreign Wars Hall.

However, a more permanent home has been found in a portion of the building at 1240 Chetco Ave., where arrangements have been made to occupy 2500 square feet set up as two rooms, with plans to broaden the program to include yoga classes, acting classes, Tango and other ballroom dances, clog combo, singing and tumbling.

Muse Theatrix has received a Public Benefit With Members status from the Oregon Secretary of State Corporation Division, and has filed for a nonprofit corporation status. It will be run as a nonprofit corporation with a board of directors consisting of five adult members and one student director. Currently, the officers of the establishment, in addition to Farr who serves as vice president, are Bryan Skidmore, president; Claire Willard, secretary; and Terrie Noller, treasurer.

Farr indicated that their vision for the future of the group is to provide a center for teens, and a place for members of the community to gather and support each other. Other listed planned activities include pre-ballet, country night for swing and line dance, jazz, a workshop for those interested in theatrical production such as, lighting, sound, costumes, directing and character building, plus bands, dancing and late-night java.

Farr said, "Friday nights will be dedicated for the teens in the community. Ages 13 to 18 will always be welcome to karaoke, play music, jam sessions, movies, games, and, of course, food, with staff and chaperones, with a ratio of one-to-six, always present."

She also said a coffee and snack bar is planned for 8 to 11 p.m., with a $5 cover charge.

The premises will be available for other activities and private parties, with a modest rental charge, she said.

Such a center cannot be run without sufficient funds, and the planners are asking for help.

"We are asking for support from the community," Farr said. "The center will be a nonprofit organization and your help is appreciated."

In addition to cash, she listed a number of other needed donations, including a refrigerator, mirrors for a dance studio, tables and chairs, sink and cabinets, piano and/or musical instruments, children's dance shoes (new or used), "dress up" clothing and fun accessories, sound and lighting equipment.

A copy of Muse Theatrix business plan, director's resumes, and references are available upon request. For information or to request a pickup of donations, call Farr at (541) 251-4027.

 

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Don’t be fooled, all is not well for stocks
    For those who only watch the headlines, the stock market looks as if it’s doing a pretty decent job digesting 6 years of gains. Or maybe this is just the calm before the storm.
  • Apple's iPad Losing its Magic?
    Apple’s last new product introduction was in April 2010, more than 4 years ago… with the press release in January of that year calling it a “ Magical & Revolutionary Device at an Unbelievable Price “.  In hindsight, despite falling a tad short of curing cancer, but selling more than 200 million of the devices since its launch, demand for tablets as a category is waning, with Apple missing unit estimates for the last two quarters. From the WSJ: Apple struggled for the second consecutive quarter to sell iPads, with unit sales falling 9.2% after a 16% drop three months earlier. In the quarter just two years ago, iPad sales were up 84%. with sluggish demand overall in North America and Europe—the base of iPad growth in recent years. Apple said this runs contrary to strong demand in emerging markets, especially in China and the Middle East. Yesterday LCD glass maker Corning (GLW) whiffed on  their Q2 earnings  expectations and offered a somber outlook for “cover-glass” demand seeing slower growth, specifically stating that “media tablet market growing slower than expected”.  GLW was down 9.5% on the weak results and outlook yesterday, giving up 4 months of gains in one fell swoop. And then this morning, consumer electronics retailer Best Buy (BBY)  asked about tablet sales by Re/Code’s Walt Mossberg, had the following to say: Q: You said the tablet had “crashed.” Do you believe it’s going away? A: Yeah, “crashed” is a strong word. So, the tablets have been an unbelievable phenomenon. I don’t think there’s a category that ever took off so quickly and so big in the history of tech. The issue has then been that, once you have a tablet of a certain generation, it’s not clear that you have to move on to the next generation. The last point is the most important one in my mind as it relates to demand in the West. The incremental improvements are just that, and they do not driving strong upgrade demand. I have always said that the iPad is the ultimate consumer discretionary device. It serves few mission critical problems as opposed to a smartphone, but is perfectly suited to stream Netflix, surf the web or maybe read a book (indoors of course). For some it serves as a computer replacement, but for most it’s their third device. And for those that it serves as a computer replacement, what’s their upgrade cycle life like assuming they are upgrading their mobile device every few years? It is my recollection that in the early days of the iPad, Steve Jobs even admitted that the device was best used for content consumption as opposed to creation.  That fact limits the potential life cycle of the category. In fact, over the last 12 months, iPad units (down 2%, 68 million vs 71 million) and sales (down 5%, $32 bln vs $33 bln) have declined from the prior 12 months, which could have been the impetus for the recently announced partnership to expand iPad penetration in the enterprise.  Most analysts see this deal as mildly positive, but if I were an investor, it would say more about Apple’s confidence in their own abilities to make a bigger push on their own into business verticals.  Steve Jobs is probably rolling in his grave on this one: So the main take-away here is Apple needs a fairly new revenue stream to counter-balance the declining demand and sales in one of the key pillars of their ecosystem.  I would also add that while Tim Cook suggested that demand in the West does not reflect that of the emerging markets, I would say that emerging markets is where low-end Chinese tablets and those from Samsung will compete aggressively on price, and we are very likely to see iPad margins come down substantially in the coming quarters. So after my love-fest on Apple yesterday (from a consumer standpoint -  MorningWord 7/29/14: King of the Beats – $AAPL ), this morning a word of caution at a time when it feels like the entire investment community is in universal agreement that there is very limited downside in the stock heading into the iPhone 6 launch in September. This post by Dan Nathan ( @riskreversal ) originally appeared on  RiskReversal.com
  • Steven Cohen still beating hedge funds after shutting SAC
    The billionaire, who started Point72 Asset Management LP to oversee his own wealth, has gained about 9 percent this year, according to two people with knowledge of the matter. Hedge funds on average have returned 2.5 percent this year through June, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The gains, close to $1 billion, equal more than half the record $1.8 billion his hedge fund paid to settle U.S. allegations of insider trading. Cohen, who is worth about $11 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, had generated average annual returns of 30 percent, one of the best records in the hedge-fund industry, since he started SAC in 1992.

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use