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Yvette Bruce and Denette Bruce are new owners of Local Market on Railroad Street. (The Pilot/Marjorie Woodfin).
Yvette Bruce and Denette Bruce are new owners of Local Market on Railroad Street. (The Pilot/Marjorie Woodfin).

By Marjorie Woodfin

Pilot staff writer

Bruce Brothers Josh and Noah aren't the only business entrepreneurs in the family. Denette, Josh's wife, and Yvette, Noah's wife, have taken over the Local Market at 604 Railroad St. with plans for a complete overhaul.

When asked what their motivation was for going into business, Denette said, "Now that our children are all in school we wanted to find a new challenge."

The sisters-in-law, who have enlisted their friend Mona Chandler as their assistant, appear to be completely in sync about their plans for the business.

The first thing the women did when they moved into the market March 20 was to remove the adult movie and magazine section which had been so highly criticized by neighborhood residents when it was started.

Denette, who has five children, and Yvette, who has two youngsters, say they want it to be a family-oriented mom-and-pop store.

"I didn't want my kids in here," Yvette said about the store before their takeover.

"We want it to be a very family friendly place," Denette added.

One thing they want to emphasize is that the store is not closing. The "Going Out of Business" sign they put up was meant only for the adult section of the market, which has been removed and will provide extra space for the changes the young women plan to make.

"We want the store to grow," Denette said. Their plans include new equipment, more grocery items such as bread, potatoes, fruit, and a deli section where business people can run in and grab a bite for lunch.

"We plan to upgrade all of the refrigerators and revamp the variety of items available," Yvette said.

"We want to do our best to accommodate our customers with a neighborhood grocery store for the area," Denette said, adding, "And we plan to advertise regular specials."

For Memorial Day weekend they have planned extra specials during the Azalea Festival. "Watch the paper," Yvette advised.

Discussing their deli plans, Denette said, "Business people will hopefully come in for lunch." She explained that they plan to accept fax and telephone orders, which they can have ready for pickup, or possibly even for delivery when they get better organized.

"Right now we're focused on getting organized." Yvette explained.

And, how do they feel about being businesswomen? "I like it," Yvette said. "It's been fun."

Hours are Monday through Friday 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

They said that they are looking forward to meeting many new customers, and are willing to consider any suggestions for items or services their clients might desire. For information phone the market at (541) 469-3413.


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