>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow LOCAL FOOD BANK TOLD TO CHANGE ITS NAME

LOCAL FOOD BANK TOLD TO CHANGE ITS NAME Print E-mail
August 24, 2007 11:00 pm

By Marjorie Woodfin

Pilot staff writer

What has for years been called the Brookings Food Bank Community Helpers can no longer operate with that name, per orders from the Oregon Food Bank.

According to those in command at the Oregon Food Bank, there is no other food bank in Oregon.

But clients of the Brookings food bank need have no fear. As long as the generosity of this community continues to keep the shelves filled, no matter what the name, food boxes will continue to be filled from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday through Friday every week by the loyal volunteers at the corner of Willow and Hemlock.

Or, at that location until the hoped-for move to new headquarters planned for the property at 539 Hemlock St. can be made. That property, made available by a more than generous donor, will become the permanent home for the food bank when required improvements can be accomplished. Donations are still urgently needed to fund those improvements.

Members of the food bank board of directors have reluctantly agreed to change the name to Brookings Food Share Community Helpers. But, as Shakespeare might have said, "A food bank called by any other name can still fight hunger."

And, according to those on the front lines, that fight is becoming more difficult. For the last three years, with needs across the country drawing supplies to areas suffering loss from floods, hurricanes, and other natural disasters, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) food and Oregon Food Bank supplies available to food banks have diminished.

Other food banks, (or whatever they are called these days), in other Oregon areas are reporting less food available. A publication in June reported that the vast Oregon Food Bank warehouse in Portland had empty triple-decker food storage units.

Snow Cap, an emergency food dispensing agency in the same county, reported that their emergency food boxes were a fifth smaller that previously. Judy Alley, executive director of Snow Cap was quoted, "A year ago, the emergency food bank box weighed 52 pounds. Now it's 43 pounds." The difference was reported to be the missing USDA surplus commodities, once the mainstay of the program.

USDA commodities, once 75 percent of Oregon Food Bank's food supply, are currently about 12 percent.

The annual U.S. Postal Service food drive, the Fred Meyer grant, and the Chetco Federal Credit Union fundraising golf tournament, plus donations from individuals, businesses, churches and other local organizations have made it possible to keep the food boxes available for those in need in Brookings-Harbor for more than 20 years.

Plans are being drawn for the required improvements for the move to 539 Hemlock. Anyone interested in donating to the building fund, or to ongoing costs of food and supplies, may obtain additional information by calling (541) 469-6988 or stopping at Willow and Hemlock between 9 a.m. and noon any Tuesday through Friday.

Volunteers are also needed. Those who currently donate time and energy at the food share insist that it is truly rewarding to serve others.

 

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Fed renews zero rate pledge, but hints at steeper rate hike path
    The Federal Reserve on Wednesday renewed its pledge to keep interest rates near zero for a "considerable time," but also indicated it could raise borrowing costs faster than expected when it starts moving. In a statement after a two-day meeting of its policy-setting Federal Open Market Committee, it announced a further $10 billion reduction in its monthly purchases, leaving the program on course to be shuttered next month. The statement was virtually unchanged from July, though new quarterly projections released with it showed the central bank's view on where interest rates should be in future years is diverging from where financial markets have bet they will be. "While the much analyzed phrase 'considerable time' remained in the FOMC statement, the newly announced scheme for interest rate normalization shows that higher rates are in the cards," said John Kilduff, a partner at Again Capital LLC in New York.
  • Dollar soars to six-year peak on yen after Fed, Tokyo stocks cheer
    SYDNEY/TOKYO (Reuters) - Japanese shares jumped on Thursday after the dollar vaulted to a six-year peak on the yen as the Federal Reserve's outlook for rising rates underlined the diverging path between the United states and the rest of the rich world. In other regional share markets, the reception was mixed, with MSCI's index of ex-Japan Asian shares falling to 12-week lows, on the spectre of rising U.S. Still, with the Fed renewing its pledge to keep interest rates near zero for a considerable time, European shares are expected to open firmer. While the Fed maintained language suggesting that rate hikes would not happen for a "considerable time," it also indicated Fed policymakers think it could raise borrowing costs faster than expected when it starts moving.
  • Toshiba says to cut 900 jobs in PC restructuring
    Japan's Toshiba Corp said it would cut 900 jobs in a restructuring of its PC business that will include an exit from business-to-consumer operations in some regions. The Japanese electronics conglomerate ...

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use