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Kruse joins law offices of Olin & Associates

Carly Kruse 

Carly Kruse, formerly with the Curry County District Attorney’s Office, has joined the law offices of Olin & Associates.

Carly Kruse, formerly with the Curry County District Attorney’s Office, has joined the law offices of Olin & Associates.

Kruse will practice as an associate attorney with the firm, said Kim Olin.

Carly is a 2008 graduate of the Vermont Law School, and received her Bachelor of Arts Degree, Magna Cum Laude, from the University of San Diego, Environmental Studies, in 2004. She was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Alpha Delta. 

Carly prosecuted criminal cases as a deputy district attorney with the Curry County District Attorney’s Office in Gold Beach. She also handled misdemeanor and felony crimes, including financial fraud and severe elder abuse cases. Her experience included counseling law enforcement officials on investigations and legal issues, often during non-work hours.  She has represented the State of Oregon in dozens of trials.

Prior to becoming a lawyer, she worked for the Oregon Supreme Court in Salem as a judicial extern from August 2008 to February 2010. She also worked for the Oregon Department of Justice as a legal extern from September 2007 to December 2007.

Kruse worked briefly for the U.S.Army Corps of Engineers, Office of Counsel, in Anchorage, Alaska, as a legal intern. Her areas of practice include Criminal Defense, Family Law, Wills, Trusts and Probate, and Civil Law.

Olin & Associates is a law practice that includes civil and criminal litigation, family law, business, wills, trusts, estate planning and probate. Olin & Associates is located by Lorings’s Sporting Goods and Edward Jones on Fleet Street in Downtown Brookings. The firm’s phone number is 541-469-2669 and the website is www.wavelaw.com 

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