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KRALJ HAS EYE FOR BUSINESS, ART

Dusanka Kralj cuts the ribbon while fellow artists and Brookings-Harbor Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors look on during ceremony officially opening Eye for Art that preceded Saturday's art walk. (The Pilot/Bill Schlichting).
Dusanka Kralj cuts the ribbon while fellow artists and Brookings-Harbor Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors look on during ceremony officially opening Eye for Art that preceded Saturday's art walk. (The Pilot/Bill Schlichting).

By Ryn Gargulinski

Pilot staff writer

Need some therapy? Or perhaps it's time to buy some art.

Both are a possibility if one gets the therapy from licensed clinical psychologist Dr. D. Rosemarie Reynolds who is an artist under her maiden name, Dusanka Kralj – and has a new office behind the new gallery run by herself and three other area artists.

While she has been providing her therapy services for several years in Crescent City and Brookings, the gallery part is new.

Located at 519 Chetco Ave., Eye for Art made its debut last weekend during the Second Saturday Art Walk.

"I am an artist and a business person and it just came to me," Kralj said of the idea. "I envisioned an abstract art gallery with an office in the back." And now she got it.

"The vision is coming true," Kralj said. "Everything comes together when you're on the right path. It's very exciting."

Also excited are her partners in the gallery – artist Barbara Kennedy, who doubles as the business owner of Brookings' Tangles salon with her husband Michael, and John and Marne Helgeson, well-established area artists who live in Gasquet, Calif.

Kralj said the way she hooked up with the other artists was also a harmonic venture.

She first saw Kennedy's art when they were both studying in the same class and then enjoyed more of her talent when they ended up in an art workshop together in Acapulco.

"Yes, it was great," Kralj said.

She first became exposed to John Helgeson's work through his frequent exhibits with Del Norte Association for Cultural Awareness – and he told her she'd love his wife's work, which she did.

Eye for Art, Kralj said, holds a mix of abstract, semi-abstract, whimsical sculptures, ceramics, professionally crafted jewelry, contemporary and experimental works, and includes art from the four founders – and then some.

"We've got art from all over Oregon and California," Kralj said. "Eugene, the San Francisco Bay area – from Portland to Laguna Beach."

In fact, Kralj said the biggest challenge thus far is having enough wall space to hang all the works.

"It's a small gallery," she said. "But as the works sell, we'll hang others."

They are still accepting artists, with the initial split being 70/30. Call Kralj at the gallery for information at (541) 469-2985.

"I just love to be surrounded by beautiful things," she said.

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