>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow JULY UNEMPLOYMENT LOWEST IN 32 YEARS

Print

JULY UNEMPLOYMENT LOWEST IN 32 YEARS

Curry Countys unemployment dropped to 3.9 percent during July, the lowest rate for any July since 1968.

Between 1968 and 2000, the lowest rate reached 4.0 percent in July 1987, said John Anderson, marketing specialist with the Employment Department office in Medford.

The rate in July 1968 was 3.6 percent, matching the rate reported in July of 1966. The second lowest July rate was 3.5 percent in 1960. The lowest rate for the month was 2.7 percent in 1959, Anderson said.

For July 2000, the department reports the county had 330 people without jobs out of a labor force of 8,510.

The 3.9 rate is down from 5.0 percent in June. By comparison, the rate was 4.7 percent in July 1999, according to department officials in Gold Beach.

In neighboring Coos County the rate dropped slightly from 7.1 to 7.0 percent in July. Last year the rate was 8.3 percent.

Coos Countys nonfarm job total dropped by more than 400 in July. The largest reduction occurred in public education because of the summer school break, officials said.

In addition, seasonal reductions in school bussing reducing employment in transportation.

Mixed trends appeared in services, officials said. Lodging places and private health care gained. Reductions occurred in business services, private education and social services.

A small increase occurred in retail trade, primarily in department stores. Job gains also occurred in construction and among federal census workers. Seasonal gains in natural resource management also boosted jobs at the federal level, officials said.

Curry Countys job total fell by 20 in July. Reductions in education were partly offset by gains in trade and services, officials said.

Summer increases in tourist related sectors added most to the tains in trade and services, officials said.

In addition, there were small increases in construction, transportation and federal employment. In the latter, officials said, seasonal gains in forestry offset reductions among census enumerators.

Statewide job gains were indicative of an improving economy, officials said.

Job gains in many industries were stronger than normal for the time of year. These gains are in contrast to modest job gains for the states economy in the first half of the year, department officials in Salem reported.

During the month, total nonfarm payroll employment in the private sector grew by 15,100 jobs, which was 5,000 jobs more than would have been accounted for by normal seasonal factors, officials said.

Despite the gains in employment as indicated by the survey of Oregon businesses, the states unemployment rate remained close to its same level of the past few months, officials said.

Oregons unemployment rate has trended the same as the U.S. unemployment rate; both have been steady within a narrow range throughout the year, officials said.

In July, the states seasonally adjusted rate was 5.0 percent, the same as in May and about the same as the revised June figure of 4.9 percent, officials said.

Meanwhile, the U.S. jobless rate was 4.0 percent in July, and has remained between 3.9 percent and 4.1 percent for the past 10 months.

Oregons raw unemployment rate dropped from 5.0 percent to 4.7 percent during the month. Department officials report 86,000 were unemployed out of a labor force of 1.83 million.

Rates in the state ranged from a high of 16.6 percent in Morrow County, the only county with a double-digit rate, to a low of 2.6 percent in Benton County. Counties with rates lower than Curry were Clatsop, 3.4 percent; Tillamook, 3.8 percent; Union, 3.8 percent; and Wasco, 3.4 percent.

The unadjusted rate for the Unites States was 4.2 percent, unchanged from Junes rate.

Officials report 6 million were without jobs out of a labor force of 142.1 million.

Print

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Divided and desperate Greeks vote in referendum that may decide euro future
    Greeks voted on Sunday in a referendum that could determine their future in Europe's common currency, with banks shuttered, the treasury empty and a population desperate, angry and so deeply split that the outcome was too close to call. The referendum is officially a Yes or No vote on a bailout offer from creditors, but a 'Yes' could bring down the government of Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, while European leaders say a 'No' could force a chaotic exit from the euro. The country of 11 million people is being asked whether to accept the offer which left-wing leader Tsipras rejected eight days ago.
  • Chinese officials, investors hope new support steps will stave off stock crash
    China's stock markets may be facing a make-or-break week after officials rolled out an unprecedented series of steps at the weekend to prevent a full-blown stock market crash that could threaten the world's second-largest economy. An online survey by fund distributor eastmoney.com over the weekend, which polled over 100,000 individuals, said investors believed stock indexes would rise over 5 percent on Monday. China stocks had more than doubled in just 12 months even as the economy cooled and company earnings weakened, resulting in a market that even China's inherently bullish securities regulators eventually admitted had become too frothy.
  • Rubbing along with robots tackles Abe's double dilemma
    Factory worker Satomi Iwata has new co-workers, a troupe of humanoid automata that are helping to address two of Japan's most pressing concerns - a shortage of labor and a need for growth. The 19 robots, which cost her employer Glory Ltd about 7.4 million yen ($60,000) each, have eye-like sensors and two arms that assemble made-to-order change dispensers alongside their human colleagues in a factory employing 370. Glory is in the vanguard as Japanese firms ramp up spending on robotics and automation, responding at last to premier Shinzo Abe's efforts to stimulate the economy and end two decades of stagnation and deflation.

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2015 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use