>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow HUNTER CREEK BUSINESS OPENING ITS DOORS IN HARBOR

HUNTER CREEK BUSINESS OPENING ITS DOORS IN HARBOR Print E-mail
June 13, 2008 11:00 pm
Workers take a break from stocking shelves at the new Gold Beach Lumber store in Harbor, which is scheduled to open Wednesday. (The Pilot/Valliant Corley).
Workers take a break from stocking shelves at the new Gold Beach Lumber store in Harbor, which is scheduled to open Wednesday. (The Pilot/Valliant Corley).

By Valliant Corley

Pilot staff writer

Customers who enter the new Gold Beach Lumber when it opens in Harbor Wednesday will be reminded a lot of the Gold Beach Lumber at Hunter Creek.

"The two stores are pretty much the same size," said Reed Ringer, president of Gold Beach Lumber.

Although the store at the site of the former Brookings Harbor Ford will open Wednesday, it won't be completed. The main sign won't be up for another week.

"The signature of the store is paint – home decoration," Ringer said as he and his son, Ryan, the general manager, began giving a tour this week.

"This will be a place where ladies like to shop," Reed Ringer said as he showed off the main entrance with a wall full of paint chips and painting supplies. "This whole section will help people make decisions about their home decor."

"People can come in, look at brochures, the paint, sit down with a salesperson," Ryan Ringer said.

"That's a digital paint dispenser. There probably isn't another one in Southern Oregon," Reed said.

The large parking area that was used to store cars at the old dealership works out well for the new lumber yard.

"Trucks will offload on the south end of the property, then cut over and exit on the north end," Reed said.

"We have a drive-through warehouse," said Ryan. "It gets people in and out. It's efficient."

"Merchandise is coming in, racks are going up, things are coming together," Reed said.

One thing we've done we think will be beneficial – we've probably tripled our inventory on moldings," Ryan said. "When we get a feel for what customers want, we'll get a lot more."

"As business grows, the inventory will grow. We'll know what people want," Reed said.

"One thing we've expanded for the Brookings market is roofing," Ryan said. "We're a distributor for Elk shingles and Owens-Corning shingles."

Reed said they expect to build a regional point for the roofing market because of the quality and quantity they will handle.

"We expect the market will be from Coos Bay to Eureka on roofing," he said.

Reed said the lumber they will carry comes from South Coast Mills.

"We want our dollars to turn over in this county," he said. "Every time we can turn the dollars in this town before they leave is a good thing."

Reed said he was looking forward to opening.

"The response has really been positive, the feedback from the community so far. I've been overwhelmed by it," he said.

Ryan said that while the lumber yard was coming together, about 75 people stopped and wanted to work there.

"I would like to hire them all, but we hired about 15," Ryan said. "We'll end up with about 45 employees in the two locations. If the growth goes the way it should, we'll add four to five more."

Ryan said that since Brookings has "much better weather, we've expanded our decking. Gold Beach has two lines of cedar and one trex. Here, we'll have three lines of cedar and two trex."

Reed said the store will be ready by Wednesday.

"What we have here will be in place by Wednesday," he said. "But once you get open, it changes every day. Products will come and go, changing with the season. It will take on a heartbeat. It's a living thing. Even if we're open for business, it's a growing process."

Ryan said a project this size should take 18 months to come together.

"We're just starting six months," he said.

"We just hope by Wednesday we have telephone service," Reed said.

 

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Market leaders seen taking S&P 500 to 2,000
    Reaching it ahead of schedule is the latest affirmation that stocks are widely preferred to bonds, even with further upside seen as limited as the Federal Reserve remains on track to end its bond-buying stimulus program in October.. The level has more psychological than fundamental significance, and it could prompt market participants to consider whether their holdings have become stretched. The "2,000 (level) has no fundamental significance outside of suggesting that stocks are fully valued and getting more so all the time," said David Joy, chief market strategist at Ameriprise Financial in Boston. Both defensive and cyclical stocks have led at times, but traders expect technology and healthcare names, the market's current leaders, to drive it over 2,000.
  • Fed's Yellen calls for caution on rates; Draghi says ECB ready to act
    The Federal Reserve should move cautiously in deciding when to raise interest rates given the U.S. In a speech at the Fed's annual central bank conference, Yellen laid out in detail why she feels the unemployment rate alone is inadequate to evaluate the strength of the jobs market and why the central bank needs to step gingerly. Her remarks were followed by a speech by the head of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi, who said the ECB was ready to use all the tools at its disposal to lift euro zone inflation if it continued to drop.
  • Goldman Sachs, U.S. agency in mortgage settlement worth $1.2 billion
    Under the settlement with the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the conservator for the two government-controlled mortgage finance companies, Goldman Sachs said it agreed to pay $3.15 billion to repurchase mortgage-backed securities from Fannie and Freddie. The FHFA, which valued the settlement at $1.2 billion, said the accord "effectively makes Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac whole on their investments in the securities at issue."

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use