>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow Grocery store opens at the port boardwalk

Grocery store opens at the port boardwalk Print E-mail
Written by Marge Woodfin, Pilot staff writer   
May 03, 2010 09:11 am
Kathy and Scott Mathey
Kathy and Scott Mathey, who opened Kathy’s Corner Market at the Port of Brookings Harbor March 3, moved to Brookings in 2004, after sailing up and down the coast in their 19-foot Hunter sailboat for years.
“We fell in love with Brookings,” Kathy said. She explained that they didn’t move to Brookings planning to open a store, but things just happened.
“We saw a need and being right here, it seemed to fall into place to take on this venture,” she said. “We were talking and wishing that we could do something, and you just know when you’re supposed to do it.”
Their shared vision when they opened the store was to have a shop with a friendly atmosphere where kids can come and customers can find things they need to pick up every day, like the old fashioned corner stores many can remember from earlier days.
They want to provide all services possible to make life enjoyable for their clients.
“We’re planning to do deliveries for RV folks, harbor liveaboards and visiting boaters, and provide a clean, friendly, family-oriented atmosphere in the store,” Scott said.
They are determined to provide just what their customers want. “We are open for suggestions and ideas, and we plan to provide convenience store service with lower prices to make it reasonable for them,” Kathy said.
She said they look forward to getting acquainted with the portside neighborhood and always welcome visitors. “We love having people come in and talk with us,” she emphasized.
Kathy’s Corner Market is currently open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., seven days a week, and they are considering extending their hours if it will help their customers.
“Please come in and let us know what we can do to serve you better,” Kathy urged.
 

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Wall Street Week Ahead: Spring fever brings hope for U.S. earnings
    Several behemoths, including Apple, the largest U.S. company by market value, as well as Microsoft, McDonald's (MCD.N) and AT&T (NYS:T), are due to report earnings. They'll be accompanied by highfliers like Netflix and Facebook, giving the first real cross-section of the state of corporate America as temperatures rise across the country and investors hope to put the cold weather behind them. Strategists will also be looking for clues on how badly China's slowdown hits U.S. corporate results. The first batch of earnings came out as equities were working their way through a selloff led by trading-crowd favorites like Netflix and the biotech stocks.
  • Compensation battle rages four years after BP's U.S. oil spill
    Jules Melancon, the last remaining oyster fisherman on an island dotted with colorful houses on stilts, says he has not found a single oyster alive in his leases in the area since the leak and relies on an onshore oyster nursery to make a living. The British oil major has paid out billions of dollars in compensation under a settlement experts say is unprecedented in its breadth. Some claimants are satisfied, but others are irate that BP is now challenging aspects of the settlement. The oil company has spent over $26 billion on cleaning up, fines and compensation for the disaster, which killed 11 people on the rig and spilled millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico for 87 days after the blast on April 20, 2010.
  • Tech workers seek to use Steve Jobs evidence in upcoming trial on no-hire accords
    Four large technology companies should not be allowed to limit evidence about Apple Inc co-founder Steve Jobs at an upcoming trial over no-hire agreements in Silicon Valley, according to a court document filed late on Thursday by employees suing the firms. Tech workers brought a class action lawsuit against Apple, Google Inc, Intel Inc and Adobe Systems Inc in 2011, alleging they conspired to avoid competing for each other's employees in order to avert a salary war. The case, which is closely watched in Silicon Valley, is largely built on emails among top executives, including Apple's late chief executive Jobs and former Google CEO Eric Schmidt.

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use