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News arrow News arrow Business arrow Grocery store opens at the port boardwalk

Grocery store opens at the port boardwalk Print E-mail
Written by Marge Woodfin, Pilot staff writer   
May 03, 2010 09:11 am
Kathy and Scott Mathey
Kathy and Scott Mathey, who opened Kathy’s Corner Market at the Port of Brookings Harbor March 3, moved to Brookings in 2004, after sailing up and down the coast in their 19-foot Hunter sailboat for years.
“We fell in love with Brookings,” Kathy said. She explained that they didn’t move to Brookings planning to open a store, but things just happened.
“We saw a need and being right here, it seemed to fall into place to take on this venture,” she said. “We were talking and wishing that we could do something, and you just know when you’re supposed to do it.”
Their shared vision when they opened the store was to have a shop with a friendly atmosphere where kids can come and customers can find things they need to pick up every day, like the old fashioned corner stores many can remember from earlier days.
They want to provide all services possible to make life enjoyable for their clients.
“We’re planning to do deliveries for RV folks, harbor liveaboards and visiting boaters, and provide a clean, friendly, family-oriented atmosphere in the store,” Scott said.
They are determined to provide just what their customers want. “We are open for suggestions and ideas, and we plan to provide convenience store service with lower prices to make it reasonable for them,” Kathy said.
She said they look forward to getting acquainted with the portside neighborhood and always welcome visitors. “We love having people come in and talk with us,” she emphasized.
Kathy’s Corner Market is currently open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., seven days a week, and they are considering extending their hours if it will help their customers.
“Please come in and let us know what we can do to serve you better,” Kathy urged.
 

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