>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow Fisherman sets his sights on a different catch – trap art

Print

Fisherman sets his sights on a different catch – trap art

Working as a struggling commercial fisherman on Florida’s Key West 14 years ago, Josh Townsend channeled his inner artist to created his first “trap art” – a  wooden replica lobster trap containing netting and lighted sea shells.

Today, Townsend, 41, calls Brookings home, still works as struggling commercial fisherman, and has started building the lighted trap art pieces again. He will donate 15 percent of the sale of each trap art to the Tsunami Relief Fund established to help Crescent City fishermen affected by the March tsunami.

“They really got hit hard, more so than here in Brookings,” Townsend said. “Some of the fishermen lost everything. I wanted to do something to help; Give them a little something that might help pay the bills or put food on the table.”

Townsend sells his decorative trap art at several Brookings-Harbor shops including Whales Tail Candy and Gifts at the Port of Brookings Harbor, and The Market Place and Wild Bird and Backyard General Store.  He will also sell the pieces this weekend at the artesian market on Lower Harbor Road at the port.

“They are very innovative and creative. I think we’ll be able to sell a lot of them,” said Merri Cook, who owns Wild Bird and Backyard General Store with her husband, Jack.

The decorative pieces can be used as night lights or tabletop decorations to create a nautical feel. Townsend buys the wood from a local hardware store and assembles them into replicas of Key West lobster traps. The wood trap is stained and coated with polyurethane.

The small pieces, measuring 8 by 9 by 12 inches, sell for $35, and the larger pieces, measuring 10 by 6 by 12 inches sell for $50.

Earlier in his life, Townsend dabbled in artistic endeavors, mostly drawing, he said. About 15 years ago in Florida, he built is first trap art in an effort to earn some much-needed extra cash. He left Key West and worked in Aspen, Colo., and Alaska, before arriving in Brookings four years ago.

“I had visited Brookings years ago and always wanted to come back,” he said.

He has been working as a commercial fisherman out of the Brookings port but, facing an uncertain financial future once again, he tuned in to his artistic muse and began building the trap art pieces.

“At my age, I can’t keep making a living as a commercial fisherman; I have to figure out another way to make a living,” he said. “This is a way to keep working for myself and make some money.”

For more information about the trap art, call Townsend at 541-254-0273 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Print

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Unknown election outcome is stocks' big fear
    Senate races next week could hold the key to whether the stock market glides through the year-end in a typical post-midterm election rally or gets hit with a fresh bout of volatility. "If we have a really uncertain situation, where the Senate is divided and candidates are threatening recounts, that's really not good," said Robbert van Batenburg, director of market strategy at Newedge USA LLC in New York. Such an outcome, while considered unlikely, nevertheless rekindles uncomfortable memories for some of the 2000 presidential election, when George W. Bush's victory over Al Gore was not confirmed for more than a month after Election Day.
  • China's October factory growth unexpectedly hits five-month low: official PMI
    China's factory activity unexpectedly fell to a five-month low in October as firms fought slowing orders and rising costs in the cooling economy, reinforcing views that the country's growth outlook is hazy at best. The official Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) eased to 50.8 in October from September's 51.1, the National Bureau of Statistics said on Saturday, but above the 50-point level that separates growth from contraction on a monthly basis. Underscoring the challenges facing the world's second-largest economy, the PMI showed foreign and domestic demand slipped to five- and six-month lows, respectively, with overseas orders shrinking slightly on a monthly basis. "There remains downward pressure on the economy, and monetary policy will remain easy," economists at China International Capital Corp said in a note to clients after the data.
  • U.S. consumer spending falters; wage gains highest since 2008
    "The fundamentals ... remain very solid," said Gus Faucher, a senior economist at PNC Financial Services in Pittsburgh. The Commerce Department said on Friday that consumer spending, which accounts for more than two-thirds of U.S.

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use