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Fischer opens daycare center

 Sharon Fischer loves children’s honesty, imagination and endearing spirit.

For those reasons, along with her belief that God put the idea in her heart, Fischer decided to open a daycare.

She just opened a preschool in-home daycare, Big Fish, Little Fish Daycare, located at 915 Hassett St., and is looking for clients. 

 

Sharon Fischer is operating Big Fish, Little Fish Daycare on Hassett Street in Brookings. The Pilot/Lorna Rodriguez
 

“I’m very excited, and very happy about it,” Fischer said. “All my adult life I’ve loved working with children. My heart just swells when I have children here.”

Her business hours are Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. She is taking children ages 2-5, and will charge $3 an hour. 

She will take no more than six preschoolers, and will  provide a free breakfast and lunch.

“I’ve always said I would never open a small business in Brookings, but I kept hearing that there’s a great demand for daycare in Brookings, and I knew that my strengths lie in that area,” Fischer said. “I know it’s God’s plan for me, and I know  that my business will succeed.”

Fischer has lived in Brookings for 13 years.

Previously, Fischer worked at Fred Meyer’s playland part time, and taught Sunday school at her church. She also raised children of her own.

“I realized more and more that’s what I wanted to do for a living,” Fischer said. 

She rented a house, earned her license and bought toys for the children.

“I love it; I find great joy in having children here,” Fischer said. 

 Fischer said her philosophy is to leave children to their own devices. She said people tend to micromanage children too much. She believes structured play is overused.

“I find that if you step back and leave children to their creative devices, you would be amazed at how much fun they have and how imaginative they are playing,” Fischer said.

Fischer also said she doesn’t have a television or video games for the children to use.

“Imagination is greatly encouraged,” she said.

Fischer said she has a large backyard that children can play in.

“I believe that most children don’t get enough free play exercise,” Fischer said. “I’m going to stress that.”

“My goal is to be able to support myself, and do what I love: taking care of little children,” Fischer said. “Another goal I have for my business is I want children to be safe, secure and happy in my home. That’s a big goal. It’s huge.”

Fischer said she foresees two challenges: making children feel comfortable with her and handling conflicts between the children.

“I’d like to think that when it’s all over and done with ... I will have molded a small child in a good way, and that I will have helped him to be the person he becomes,” Fischer said.

Fischer can be reached at (541) 251-3511.

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